Work from Home, Light Therapy Style

This past year has shaken us up, leaving many of us in new routines that we’re still adjusting to. Unless you’re an essential worker, many of us are now working from home to reduce contact with others. Though working from home was a dream for many, it’s safe to say we didn’t imagine things working from home looking like this.  

The quick transition from in-office to working from home has left many unprepared. Aside from working under stressful conditions, most people simply brought home their laptop, thinking this would be a short-term situation. But things didn’t go as planned.

A year has passed, and those same people are still working from their kitchen table. The problem? Working from home can do more harm than good when it comes to our mental and physical health. And with that, there’s an increased risk of burning out, injuring yourself from a lack of proper office equipment, and the blurred lines between one’s personal and work life. 

So how do you divide work life from home life if your home has become your workplace? 

When all these issues compile on top of each other, it’s a recipe for disaster. More people who work from home are experiencing neck and joint pain, increased screen time, poor sleep, eye strain, and heightened stress and fatigue levels. 

Naturally, most doctors will say the remedies for these symptoms is to reduce stress by working out, meditating, going into nature, taking more breaks, massaging sore muscles, or working with proper equipment. But with lockdowns and quarantines implemented, those solutions aren’t necessarily available. 

However, red light therapy is an all-in-one treatment therapy that can promote quality sleep, reduced stress, and alleviate neck and joint pain. 

But how does red light therapy work? 

Let’s take a look at how light therapy treats neck and shoulder pain.

Most treatments for neck and shoulder pain consist of physical therapy, massage, or pain relief medication. But red light therapy has proven to be a non-invasive option for significantly reducing neck and shoulder pain. 

Red light therapy works by reducing inflammation, which is usually both the cause and symptom of neck and shoulder pain. Red and infrared light penetrates through the skin, reaching the cells that produce energy (adenosine triphosphate) in the mitochondria. By increasing the function of the mitochondria, cells make more adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and begin the process of rejuvenating and repairing themselves.

When inflammation occurs in the body, red light therapy repairs those damaged cells in the muscles, tendons, and ligaments, reducing the pain felt in the neck and shoulders.

However, as we stated earlier, red light therapy isn’t only for neck and joint pain. When it comes to inflammation, it occurs everywhere in the body, including the eyes. 

When working from home, we are typically spending three more hours per day in front of our electronic devices. This has a serious impact on eyesight and overall well being. Research has shown that red light therapy treatments can help heal the eyes from injury, reduce inflammation, and protect against vision loss. 

As we spend more time in front of our devices, we experience more fatigue and reduced quality of sleep. Red light therapy helps trigger our natural circadian rhythm and promotes improved sleep, thus reducing fatigue. 

Working from home hasn’t been the dream we’ve all hoped for. In fact, it’s negatively impacted our mental and physical health. However, there’s a solution to your symptoms and it’s red light therapy. 

Kaiyan Medical manufactures MDA-certified and FDA-approved laser light therapy devices, ideal for people who are experiencing symptoms from working from home, including eye strain, fatigue, stress, and neck and shoulder pain. 




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Lighting the Hidden Wounds: The Trauma from Human Trafficking

Lighting the Hidden Wounds: The Trauma from Human Trafficking

Human Trafficking

Human trafficking involves force, fraud, or coercion to obtain some labor or commercial sex act. Every year, millions of men, women, and children are trafficked worldwide — including the United States. It can happen in any community, and victims can be of any age, race, gender, or nationality. Traffickers might use violence, manipulation, or false promises of well-paying jobs or romantic relationships to lure victims into trafficking situations.

Traumas

Recent trauma studies have deepened our understanding of trauma and its impact. They describe a complex range of post-trauma symptoms and identify the interactions of multiple factors as contributing to their seriousness. For example, more serious symptoms are associated with histories of multiple victimizations, often beginning in childhood and disrupting parent-child relationships. More profound impacts are also associated with co-occurring behavioral health problems, like substance abuse disorders, and with a range of other issues, like limited social supports, lower socioeconomic status, and stigma associated with particular traumatic events. Trauma exposure occurs along a continuum of “complexity,” from the less complex single, adult-onset incident (e.g., a car accident) where all else is stable in a person’s life, to the repeated and intrusive trauma “frequently of an interpersonal nature, often involving a significant amount of stigma or shame” and where an individual may be more vulnerable, due to a variety of factors, to its effects. On this far end of the continuum, victims of human trafficking, especially sex trafficking, can be placed.

Post-trauma responses for victims of human trafficking

Most of the literature on trauma and trafficking focuses on the trafficking of foreign-born women and girls for commercial sexual exploitation. In addition to experiencing terrorizing physical and sexual violence, researchers report that victims often experience multiple layers of trauma, including psychological damage from captivity and fear of reprisals if escape is contemplated, brainwashing, and for some, a long history of family, community, or national violence. Additionally, the emotional effects of trauma can be persistent and devastating. Victims of human trafficking may suffer from anxiety, panic disorder, major depression, substance abuse, eating disorders, and a combination of these. For some victims, the trauma induced by someone they once trusted results in pervasive mistrust of others and their motives. This impact of trauma can make the job of first responders and those trying to help victims difficult at best. In some cases, exposure to trauma results in a condition referred to as Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). PTSD is a mental health diagnostic category created originally for war combatants and disaster victims and applies to victims of other traumas, including trafficking victims. For those that struggle with PTSD, the characterizing symptoms include intrusive re-experiencing of the trauma (e.g., flashbacks, nightmares, and intrusive thoughts), avoidance or numbing of trauma-related, or trauma-triggering stimuli (e.g., avoiding certain places, people, and situations), and hyperarousal (e.g., heightened startle response, and inability to concentrate). Once established, for both adults and youth, PTSD is usually chronic and debilitating if left untreated. Post-trauma responses like those outlined above reportedly contribute to problems with functioning, including difficulties controlling emotions, sudden outbursts of anger or self-mutilation, difficulties concentrating, suicidal behaviors, alterations in consciousness, and increased risk-taking.

Limited availability and access to appropriate mental health services.

Issues of affordability and access to services and the responsiveness of those services to the complex needs of survivors are common issues identified by service providers. Providers uniformly point to access to mental health services as a significant challenge for both international and domestic victims. For most victims, shame is seen as one of the greatest barriers preventing them from seeking mental health services. Providers note that the stigma associated with mental illness is an especially prominent challenge in engaging foreign-born and male victims in treatment. For other victims, while providers report a willingness to seek help for physical health complaints, the underlying cause of the physical problems or symptoms — the trauma — often goes ignored and untreated. For U.S. minor victims, barriers to accessing mental health services are linked primarily to the issues of confidentiality and concerns that someone will find out what has happened to them, lack of identification documents, lack of insurance, and system-related jurisdictional issues. For example, it is often assumed that child welfare systems will provide mental health services for minors. 2 Requirements to report minors to child protective services do not necessarily result in access to treatment. If a parent or legal guardian does not inflict the abuse, the case is often seen as outside the system's jurisdiction. In such cases, the minors fall through the cracks and do not receive the services they need. But there are still challenges even if a youth has health insurance or is served under the child welfare system. Most providers note that referral sources for mental health treatment or counseling are limited for youth and adults. In one community, the wait for a psychiatric referral for youth was up to seven months. Once access to mental health or counseling services is obtained, many providers cannot maintain the long-term treatment that many victims require. Providers report that insurance and/or funding restrictions often limit the number of sessions a victim can receive. Furthermore, traditional therapeutic services are often ill-designed to respond to transient victim populations' needs, particularly U.S. minor victims, who sometimes find it difficult to meet expectations for weekly appointments. Responsive mental health treatment requires considerable flexibility, which existing systems of care may not support. Therefore, while getting services in response to the immediate crisis is not viewed as a problem in most cases, helping a victim with long-term trauma recovery is a significant concern.

The new therapy: Red Light

During the last 20 years, a large body of research has accumulated on the beneficial effects of infrared light in the range of 600 to 1000 nm. Infrared light can activate mitochondria, stimulating second messenger systems, DNA transcription, and growth factors. As a result, new synapses are formed, circuits regrow, and pluripotent stem cells differentiate into neurons.

Animal studies have shown that infrared photobiomodulation (PBM) may reduce the size and severity of brain injury and stroke and diminish damage and physiological symptoms in depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), Parkinson's disease, and Alzheimer's disease.  Michael Hamblin, Ph.D., from the Wellman Center for Photomedicine at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, a leader in the field, describes PBM as “the use of red or near-infrared light to stimulate, heal, regenerate, and protect tissue that has either been injured, is degenerating, or else is at risk of dying.”

Can Infrared Light Reach the Brain?

The human scalp and skull provide a significant barrier. Infrared light energy needs to be in the range of 0.9 to 15 J/cm2 at the target tissue to activate mitochondria and other cellular events. Even if a 0.5-W LED only had to penetrate the skull to reach the surface of the brain, it could only deliver 0.0064 J/cm2 or 1/140th of the minimum energy necessary to induce PBM. No energy would be expected to reach the depths of the brain needed to treat stroke, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, or many brain injuries.

Treating TBI, PTSD, and Depression with Infrared Light

Patented Kaiyan Medical light therapy products involve transcranial infrared laser treatment (NILT). Our devices are based on clinical trials with significant clinical improvement of symptoms, including headaches, cognitive problems, sleep disturbances, irritability, and depression.

An open-label clinical trial (n=39) demonstrated effectiveness for depression. Overall, 92% of patients responded, and 82% remitted, which is notably better than the response rate for oral antidepressants. Patients saw benefits within 4 treatments, and some achieved resolution of depressive symptoms within 8 treatments. I

At Kaiyan, every day, we reconsider the potential mechanisms underlying the meager improvements derived from LED-based devices. The light from LED devices may not penetrate beyond the skin in some cases. Still, it could induce central nervous system benefits via a remote or systemic effect in irradiated skin, dubbed remote photobiomodulation.

Sources

Study of HHS Programs Serving Human Trafficking Victims
Principal Investigator: Heather Clawson Caliber, an ICF International Company Prepared for: Office of the Assistant…aspe.hhs.gov

Our Work: Industries, Services, and Clients
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Hamblin MR. Shining light on the head: Photobiomodulation for brain disorders. BBA Clin. 2016;6:113–124.

Henderson TA, Morries, LD. Near-infrared photonic energy penetration: can infrared phototherapy effectively reach the human brain? Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat. 2015;11:2191–2208.

Chung H, Dai T, Sharma SK, Huang YY, Carroll JD, Hamblin MR. The nuts and bolts of low-level laser (light) therapy. Ann Biomed Eng. 2012;40(2):516–533.

Henderson TA, Morries LD. Multi-Watt near-infrared phototherapy for the treatment of comorbid depression: an open-label single-arm study. Front Psychiatry. 2017;8:187.

Johnstone DM, Moro C, Stone J, Benabid AL, Mitrofanis J. Turning on lights to stop neurodegeneration: the potential of near infrared light therapy in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. Front Neurosci. 2016;11;9:500.

Stop Putting Ice in your Injuries

Stop Putting Ice in your Injuries

Icing an injury is one of the most common treatment modalities. But is icing actually beneficial?

For decades, coaches and doctors have recommended applying ice to minor injuries like sprains and strains. The method itself is straightforward, apply ice, put pressure on it, and rest. This approach to recovery has been massively popular because it doesn’t require any special equipment or expertise.

The idea got popular in 1978 with the book Sportsmedicine Book written by Dr. Gabe Mirkin. Since the book’s publication, Dr. Mirkin has actually changed his stance on ice as a helpful recovery modality. By staying up to date with new recovery research, Dr. Mirkin’s views on ice adapted and evolved. He now believes that applying ice to injured tissue causes the blood vessel to constrict and stop the blood flow necessary for healing and processing inflammation.

Ice Isn’t Good for Recovery.

Since the late ’70s, many more studies have been conducted that specifically examine cold therapy’s effect on soft tissue injury. One 2008 meta-analysis that examined multiple studies found that there isn’t enough evidence to suggest icing improves the healing of soft tissue injuries.

Studies have concluded that applying ice is based largely on anecdotal evidence or someone saying the modality works without any hard data. Anecdotal evidence is hard to counteract. People tend to believe in what they think works and have seen work, even if research evidence disproves their reasoning. Icing injuries is just one example.

Ice Harmful for Recovery?

Ice may be the safest, simplest pain relief tool we have at our disposal. When used to numb an injury, ice is beneficial. But when used for more than 5 minutes, according to Dr. Mirkin, ice can be detrimental to the body’s natural tissue repair process. Extended use of ice can also lead to reduced strength, flexibility, and endurance.

Ice is not an ideal recovery method because it has the effect of slowing your body’s natural response, which is essential to healing. It’s better to use a modality that enhances your body’s natural recovery response, like light therapy.

Light Therapy Heals Better than Ice

Healthy light intake is a key part of a healthy, balanced lifestyle. Like exercise, nutritious eating, and restful sleep, healthy light intake can greatly impact managing recovery. You can enhance cellular function and help support your body’s natural recovery process with light therapy treatments.

Inflammation & Red Light Therapy

Inflammation is a natural response to injury and an integral part of the healing process. In a healthy response to stress or injury, inflammation sets in within a few hours and works to clear the damaged tissue and start the repair process. Once the injury or strain is healed, the inflammation gradually fades away.

Ice and red light therapy have very different effects on inflammation. Ice works to suppress the body’s inflammatory response, while red light therapy supports inflammation management. Ice prevents normal inflammation from doing its job, which is to help us heal and process strain. Red light therapy can speed up the recovery process by helping the body process inflammation and oxidative stress more efficiently. Dr. Michael Hamblin of Harvard Medical School is one of the world’s leading photomedicine researchers, and he believes light therapy produces an “overall reduction in inflammation.”

Sleep is Still Key for Recovery

Dr. Mirkin may have changed his stance on ice usage for recovery, but basic rest remains a core recovery component. There’s no substitute for sleep when it comes to your body’s ability to heal itself. Red light therapy treatments are designed to enhance cellular function. They support a balanced lifestyle with healthy light in the comfort of your own home, which can positively impact the quality of your sleep.


Elevate Your Home Office With Light Therapy

Elevate Your Home Office With Light Therapy

If you’re feeling burned out after over one year of working at home, you’re not alone; many people share your frustration. Sadly, it’s becoming increasingly common to feel this sort of work-from-home fatigue. As much as it seemed, in the beginning, that working from home would be fun, no one thought it would last this long. It’s now a part of so many people’s routine, and we may be wondering what the return to normality will look like. Some people feel even more anxious returning to the office because they’re worried about getting sick, or have simply become accustomed to this new way of life. 

And, some people have become too comfortable with the #WFH lifestyle. Studies show that working from a bed or couch, though comfy, is extremely harmful in the long run, and many people have yet to create a proper workspace in their home. 

Never before has the modern world seen such a long-term situation like this, which poses the question: what will the long-term effects be? Just like associating your bed with work brings on bad feelings and habits towards your bedroom, working from home creates this sensation of losing your personal space.

So, how can you elevate your home office and continue to make the most of this ongoing situation? 

First off, if you can, don't work from your bedroom. Keep the bedroom solely as your personal space. If you don't have an office space, you can transform a living room or kitchen corner into a workspace. And, your body will thank you if you invest in a good desk and chair, and—ergonomic mice and keyboards are an office must-have. Ergonomics affects health more than you'd think, which is why you should try to be aware of your surroundings and give yourself the best work environment.

Second, stick to a schedule whenever possible. The moment you're done work, turn off your computer. Healthy distance from work helps you rest during off-time, and be more engaged while you’re on the clock. Even with the best ergonomic equipment, they cannot help the harm you’re doing to your body when sitting in front of the computer for too many hours each day. 

But most importantly, you should pay attention to your health, both physical and mental. It's no surprise that due to COVID, we've all become a bit estranged from others, and even ourselves. Give yourself the attention and care that you deserve and need. If you're noticing your physical and mental health sliding, light therapy's at-home treatments can help people get back on track.

But what does light therapy do, exactly? 

Well, for one, it can help improve both your physical and mental health. Light therapy works the way it sounds—it's light that's produced from a light box, mask, or lamp. The type of light therapy also varies since you could be using blue light for acne, red light for skin inflammation, purple for relaxation, and so on. You can select the colors depending on your needs.

The light from our devices helps stimulate ATP production, which is the powerhouse of the mitochondria. Through ATP stimulation, cellular turnover happens at a faster rate, rejuvenating dead and old skin cells. With light therapy, you help your body regenerate, improving your overall well-being. For example, we all know that sunlight has a direct effect on people, providing us with the vitamin D we need for our bodies to perform optimally. One of the main vitamins that have been missing during this pandemic is vitamin D. Though it doesn’t act as a replacement, light therapy treats vitamin D deficiency, reducing symptoms including depression and anxiety. It can also help you sleep by regulating circadian rhythm and helping to produce more melatonin. 

Light therapy devices are non-invasive, meaning that you aren't putting yourself at any health risk. You could set up a light panel at a corner, where you go to relax, play music and have a light treatment. Or, you could even set it near your desk so that you start associating the home workplace as a therapeutic space as well – where you get your daily dose of sunshine. 

So where can you get your trusted at-home light therapy device? Kayian's light therapy devices are MDA-certified and FDA-approved light therapy devices. Perfect for self at-home treatments right from the comfort of your home, you can purchase them for yourself, for your patients, or even have the devices private labeled for your practice. It’s the essential tool we’ve all been looking for during this pandemic that provides full-body health and wellness benefits.

Green Light Continues to Show Positive Effects on Migraine Sufferers

Green Light Continues to Show Positive Effects on Migraine Sufferers

Anyone who’s had a migraine knows how debilitating can be - even more so if that person is a chronic migraine sufferer. At its worst, migraines can be all-consuming: you can't open your eyes from the pain, perhaps even suffering from nausea and vomiting. 

Migraines are even more common than you think. They’re a more powerful headache, which usually affects one side of the head. Sometimes they come with warnings, but most times you’ll just get them suddenly, which is probably the most inconvenient part. Migraines can be difficult and painful. You could be having a regular day with no problems, and suddenly you'll get a jolt of pain to your head that feels inescapable.

Dealing with a migraine is often a serious challenge; you can’t just go lie down and take 30-minutes to rest up. It takes hours, even days for a migraine to end. And if you’re working, unable to take multiple days off, this is a serious problem. 

Migraines can happen with or without auras. When they occur with auras, this means you see flickering light, spots, or lines. It can feel like your mind is playing games with you when in reality, it's a migraine forming. 

Migraines without auras are the ones that come without warning; however, mood changes can be an indicator that a migraine is manifesting itself for you. Your eyes could start burning or watering, and your nose could be stuffy right before a migraine. They usually feel like a throbbing pain in your head, as mentioned, often on one side of the head. Neck pains and cramps are also something you could be feeling and experiencing during a migraine. 

They often feel like a tightening of the whole head and body, giving a rather inconvenient sensation. It's not uncommon to experience vertigo and double vision, as well. Migraines sometimes feel incurable, precisely because of the way the symptoms can vary. You can experience one type of migraine and, within a few days, a completely different one. Sometimes they last for minutes and others, hours or days. 

If you, someone you know, or a patient of yours is experiencing migraines frequently and severely, that person has probably seen a doctor for the condition. And though some people have shelves full of prescriptions, many are seeking something less invasive, without side effects, yet still effective. Well, luckily, there is a solution for non-invasive migraine treatment: light therapy lamp treatments.

Light therapy is a way of transforming your overall health. In a light therapy treatment, you not only receive relief for your migraine but also for your general health. LED light therapy health benefits multiply the more invested you are. Light therapy eases the symptoms of whatever may be getting in your way while increasing your energy and improving mood.

How light therapy can help migraines is via green light. While green light therapy has been studied for a while, recent studies are proving its effectiveness against migraines. A new study shows that green light exposure reduced the number of headache days per month by an average of about 60%. The light not only reduced the pain but reduced the time of the migraine, making it shorter and more bearable. Another study showed that immediately after light therapy treatment, patients reported reduced migraine discomfort by 20%. Green light also produces a relaxing effect and has shown a much better result at dealing with migraines long-term than any other form of light. 

So by penetrating into the body’s cells, it regenerates your cellular system, and thus, the whole body. It’s a process that should be done in the darkness, at any given time, for a period of 15-30 minutes. With daily treatments, you are more likely to reap the many benefits of light therapy. 

Kayian's light therapy devices are perfect for at-home treatments or for use in medical clinics, specifically designed for you or your clients’ wants and needs. They are MDA-certified and FDA-approved, ensuring that your light therapy device meets medical and safety standards.

Incorporating Meditation into Your Light Therapy Ritual

Incorporating Meditation into Your Light Therapy Ritual

It is said that stress is the precursor of all sickness. In a modern and increasingly fast society like ours, stress is responsible for many mental and physical health issues. Being stressed has become the norm, and yet we often waste our free time on things we don't even enjoy that much (social media scrolling, anyone)? 

We've all been there. We feel stressed as a result of family or relationship issues, or before a test or daunting event. On top of that, leading a hectic and unbalanced lifestyle doesn't help keep us calm and collected, but it rather intensifies the stress.

Stress is tied to a 36 percent greater risk of developing 41 autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, Crohn's disease, and celiac disease. We've become our own enemies. While we're rushing and running to get everything done, our bodies are developing serious problems, and we're not even noticing. 

Taking fifteen minutes out of your day to focus on yourself, your mind, and your body shouldn't be viewed as a luxury. In the time you spend complaining that it takes time out of your day, you could've paused and done it. So, why not change your narrative and allow yourself a little bit of relief? 

So, it’s time to invest in yourself. Light therapy is not only beneficial for our outer beauty but our inner balance as well. It works inward, directly targeting cells and promoting cellular rejuvenation. And there are many ways to use light therapy; from aiding in skincare problems to using our UV light therapy for wound healing.

The type of light therapy depends on your choice; there are a variety of colors that target different issues. Ranging from red and blue to yellow and purple, they all share the same benefit of light working on accelerating our adenosine triphosphate (ATP). ATP is the fuel of our cells and a better ATP production equates to a better organism in total. 

Light is known to trigger the release of serotonin in our brain. Serotonin is also known as the happy "feel-good" brain chemical. Light therapy is the perfect intervention when feeling down; it's also linked to improving other mental issues. 

It helps alleviate stress and is something that can be done at home with our light therapy devices. Not only are you reaping health and beauty benefits, but also you're promoting balanced brain activity. The beauty of doing the treatments yourself is that you get to choose when to do them and on what terms. Pairing your light therapy treatment with meditation could be the way to go.

Why do we mention meditation? Well, its benefits to the body and mind are infinite, and it can also help with your light therapy treatment. There are many different ways to incorporate meditation into your daily routine.

Meditation is, in general, a practice to achieve greater control of the activities of our mind so that it becomes capable of concentrating on a single thought, on a high concept, without overthinking and becoming still, peaceful. Akin to meditation is contemplation, which means letting the mind rest in its natural state. Therefore, it is a practice aimed at self-realization, which can have a religious, spiritual, philosophical purpose, or improve psychophysical conditions.

Pairing your time for light therapy with meditation will only compel your body even more to enter a state most pure to its well-being. Letting the outside world go and only focusing within while your cells truly are being rejuvenated is an incredible process, and a ritual you can incorporate into your daily or weekly self-care regimen.

We so often struggle to find a real escape when we could obtain one right within our homes. Scheduling light therapy-meditation sessions for yourself daily will give you a mindful time to look forward to. You can benefit both physically and mentally in your health, even now when that seems harder to accomplish each day. 

At Kaiyan, we’re dedicated to improving the body from the inside out. To help you achieve a balanced life, our MDA-certified and FDA-approved light therapy devices are the perfect at-home treatment. 

Green Light for Migraines: Does This Therapy Work?

Green Light for Migraines: Does This Therapy Work?


“Migraine is one of the most common neurological conditions in the world, and it’s debilitating,” said Dr. Ibrahim

Green Light

The noninvasive nature of green light exposure makes it an ideal therapeutic candidate for other neurological conditions, such as fibromyalgia or HIV-related pain. Dr. Ibrahim and his team recently completed another clinical study in which people with fibromyalgia tried green light therapy. Like the migraine study, those results are similarly encouraging.

Clinical Study

Pharmacological management of migraines can be ineffective for some patients. Studies previously demonstrated that exposure to green light resulted in antinociception and reversal of thermal and mechanical hypersensitivity in rodent pain models. Given green light-emitting diodes' safety, they evaluated green light as a potential therapy in patients with episodic or chronic migraines.

For the study, they recruited (29 total) patients, of whom seven had episodic migraines, and 22 had chronic migraines. They used a one-way cross-over design consisting of exposure for 1–2 hours daily to the white light-emitting diodes for 10 weeks, followed by a 2-week washout period followed by exposure for 1–2 hours daily green light-emitting diodes for 10 weeks. Patients were allowed to continue current therapies and to initiate new treatments as directed by their physicians. Outcomes consisted of patient-reported surveys. The primary outcome measure was the number of headache days per month. Secondary outcome measures included patient-reported changes in the headaches' intensity and frequency over a two-week period and other quality of life measures, including the ability to fall and stay asleep and ability to perform work. Changes in pain medications were obtained to assess potential reduction.

When seven episodic migraine and 22 chronic migraine patients were analyzed as separate cohorts, white light-emitting diodes produced no significant change in headache days in either episodic migraine or chronic migraine patients. Combining data from the episodic migraine and chronic migraine groups showed that white light-emitting diodes produced a small but statistically significant reduction in headache days (days ± SEM) 18.2 ± 1.8 to 16.5 ± 2.01 days. Green light-emitting diodes resulted in a significant decrease in headache days from 7.9 ± 1.6 to 2.4 ± 1.1 and 22.3 ± 1.2 to 9.4 ± 1.6 in episodic migraine and chronic migraine patients, respectively. While some improvement in secondary outcomes was observed with white light-emitting diodes, more secondary outcomes with significantly greater magnitude, including assessments of the quality of life, Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire, Headache Impact Test-6, and Five-level version of the EuroQol five-dimensional survey without reported side effects, were observed with green light-emitting diodes. Conclusions regarding pain medications reduction with green light-emitting diode exposure were not possible. No side effects of light therapy were reported. None of the patients in the study reported initiation of new therapies.

Green light-emitting diodes significantly reduced the number of headache days in people with episodic migraines or chronic migraines. Additionally, the green light-emitting diodes significantly improved multiple secondary outcome measures, including quality of life, intensity, and headache attack duration. As no adverse events were reported, the green light-emitting diodes may provide a treatment option for those patients who prefer non-pharmacological therapies or may be considered in complementing other treatment strategies. The limitations of this study are the small number of patients evaluated. The positive data obtained support the implementation of larger clinical trials to determine the possible effects of green light-emitting diode therapy.


This study is registered with clinicaltrials.gov under NCT03677206.

https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0333102420956711

Follow the Numbers: Light Therapy's Projected Market Revenue Surges

Follow the Numbers: Light Therapy's Projected Market Revenue Surges

Follow the numbers: light therapy's projected market revenue surges

Light therapy is used for many problems, such as skin conditions, eczema, vitiligo, acne, and rosacea. But it's also very popular as a skincare remedy for wrinkles, age spots, and collagen production.  While helping outwardly, it also works directly with mitochondria, the cells' powerhouse, improving our cell production and increasing cellular function. The non-invasive treatment is gaining popularity for its incredible benefits and cost-effectiveness. 

Light therapy also helps with our lack of vitamin D, and with the current world situation of quarantine and COVID-19, the lack has been more than evident. It helps with psychological conditions that have been rapidly increasing in the past few years, and the current situation only aids in the battle against winter blues and depression. This form of therapy increases melatonin levels and mood levels, helping with fatigue and sleep quality.

Since the market has been affected due to the pandemic, people have been turning to light therapy for its mental and physical benefits. The light therapy market is anticipated to reach 1,112.16 million dollars at a CAGR of 5.1%  by 2025, says Market Research Future (MRFR).

The American market is set to take the lead over in the next few years. Growing international curiosity for light therapy will also help the infrastructure, improve quality with more developers, stimulating substantial market growth. 

For winter blues, light therapy should experience a rise in growth by 5.1% till 2027. Due to less sunlight, light therapy proves as the ultimate fit for those in the Northern Hemisphere. The Asia Pacific light therapy market revenue surpassed USD 175 million in 2018, it is poised to expand at 5.7% CAGR through 2027. Their awareness of the growing patient pool and beauty conscious people fuel the demand for light therapy because of its amazing results in various skin conditions. 

Rising per capita income and the growing influence of social media are opening new avenues for the Asian Pacific market. The demand for light therapy is considerable among people in China and Japan. In addition, its popularity is also rising in developing nations owing to its advanced features and low cost. 

A segment of light therapy specializing in floor and desk lamps of the market was valued at more than 140 million dollars in 2018 and will witness a similar growth trend in the future. Similarly, large reflectors in the floor and desk lamps that diffuse bright light for accurate visualization are predicted to be in higher demand in the upcoming years.

Homecare settings portion had its share of revenue, counting more than 490 million dollars in 2018, and will exhibit a similar rising forecast in the upcoming timeline for light therapy. In 2020 these products held up to 60% of the market share. 

Demand for simplicity and more availability is what allows the rising demand for homecare handheld and user-friendly devices. It's predicted to grow gradually. Manufacturers will focus on developing light therapy devices that specifically solve health-related issues at home by providing easy access and improved patient management. 

North America light therapy market size crossed 350 million dollars in 2020 due to technological advancements paired with light therapy's growing use of light therapy.

Key developers in the U.S. have gained approvals from the FDA for new products, like Kaiyan Medical. With FDA-certified and MDA-approved devices, Kaiyan leads the light therapy devices industry and will continue to play a crucial role for the overall growth in the North American industry.


Work from Home, Light Therapy Style

Work from Home, Light Therapy Style

This past year has shaken us up, leaving many of us in new routines that we’re still adjusting to. Unless you’re an essential worker, many of us are now working from home to reduce contact with others. Though working from home was a dream for many, it’s safe to say we didn’t imagine things working from home looking like this.  

The quick transition from in-office to working from home has left many unprepared. Aside from working under stressful conditions, most people simply brought home their laptop, thinking this would be a short-term situation. But things didn’t go as planned.

A year has passed, and those same people are still working from their kitchen table. The problem? Working from home can do more harm than good when it comes to our mental and physical health. And with that, there’s an increased risk of burning out, injuring yourself from a lack of proper office equipment, and the blurred lines between one’s personal and work life. 

So how do you divide work life from home life if your home has become your workplace? 

When all these issues compile on top of each other, it’s a recipe for disaster. More people who work from home are experiencing neck and joint pain, increased screen time, poor sleep, eye strain, and heightened stress and fatigue levels. 

Naturally, most doctors will say the remedies for these symptoms is to reduce stress by working out, meditating, going into nature, taking more breaks, massaging sore muscles, or working with proper equipment. But with lockdowns and quarantines implemented, those solutions aren’t necessarily available. 

However, red light therapy is an all-in-one treatment therapy that can promote quality sleep, reduced stress, and alleviate neck and joint pain. 

But how does red light therapy work? 

Let’s take a look at how light therapy treats neck and shoulder pain.

Most treatments for neck and shoulder pain consist of physical therapy, massage, or pain relief medication. But red light therapy has proven to be a non-invasive option for significantly reducing neck and shoulder pain. 

Red light therapy works by reducing inflammation, which is usually both the cause and symptom of neck and shoulder pain. Red and infrared light penetrates through the skin, reaching the cells that produce energy (adenosine triphosphate) in the mitochondria. By increasing the function of the mitochondria, cells make more adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and begin the process of rejuvenating and repairing themselves.

When inflammation occurs in the body, red light therapy repairs those damaged cells in the muscles, tendons, and ligaments, reducing the pain felt in the neck and shoulders.

However, as we stated earlier, red light therapy isn’t only for neck and joint pain. When it comes to inflammation, it occurs everywhere in the body, including the eyes. 

When working from home, we are typically spending three more hours per day in front of our electronic devices. This has a serious impact on eyesight and overall well being. Research has shown that red light therapy treatments can help heal the eyes from injury, reduce inflammation, and protect against vision loss. 

As we spend more time in front of our devices, we experience more fatigue and reduced quality of sleep. Red light therapy helps trigger our natural circadian rhythm and promotes improved sleep, thus reducing fatigue. 

Working from home hasn’t been the dream we’ve all hoped for. In fact, it’s negatively impacted our mental and physical health. However, there’s a solution to your symptoms and it’s red light therapy. 

Kaiyan Medical manufactures MDA-certified and FDA-approved laser light therapy devices, ideal for people who are experiencing symptoms from working from home, including eye strain, fatigue, stress, and neck and shoulder pain. 




Light Therapy & C-sections

Light Therapy & C-sections

The experience of transformation from womanhood into motherhood is a privilege reserved exclusively for women. Pregnancy and childbirth are wonderful and remarkable moments of life. Giving birth to a child can be one of the most joyful experiences too. Naturally, expectant mothers spend a lot of time thinking about how they will give birth. Although most people believe that vaginal birth is the best way to deliver, sometimes a Caesarean section cannot be avoided. As well, labor pain is one of the most intense pains experienced by women, which leads to an increase in the number of women opting to undergo a cesarean delivery. Pharmacological and nonpharmacological analgesia methods are used to control labor pain. Epidural analgesia is the most commonly used pharmacological analgesia method. However, it may have side effects on the fetus and the mother. Light-emitting diode (LED) photobiomodulation is an effective and noninvasive alternative to pharmacological methods.

Caesarean section was introduced in clinical practice as a lifesaving procedure both for the mother and the baby. It is a surgical procedure in which the incision is made on the products of conception. Caesarean birth is often used as a prophylactic measure to alleviate the problems of birth, such as cephalo pelvic disproportion, failure to progress in labor or fetal distress. A major concern in maternal and child health nursing is the increasing number of caesarean birth being performed annually. In India, primary caesarean birth is about 30.2% of births. The majority of the states are within the WHO specified range of Caesarean section (5 to 15%). Among that, five states are above the range and 12 states below the specified range. Reports also say that the prevalence of Caesarean section is generally more in the southern states. After the baby is born via C-section, the result is a wound that must heal, and pain is common during this healing process.

Wound healing acceleration and pain management in women who underwent the cesarean surgery could help them to return to their normal functioning, especially to begin breastfeeding their newborns as one of the most important aspects of newborn care. Failure incomplete healing of the wound is one of the probable complications of caesarean section. Post caesarean wound infection due to delayed wound healing and pain are not only a leading cause of prolonged hospital stay but a major cause of the widespread aversion to caesarean delivery in developing countries. Management of those problems is essential to decrease infection, length of the hospital stay, pain, and help to return for normal function.

Mothers who undergo caesarean section should achieve immediate recovery than other surgical patients because of maternal and neonatal wellbeing. Several studies have investigated many approaches and protocols of wound healing and pain management in women undergoing caesarean section. Though different approaches have been introduced, these approaches are still inadequate and unsatisfactory in many patients. Thus it seems that postoperative management in this group of people is more challenging than other surgical patients. Infrared Rays have a therapeutic effect of increasing the blood supply and relieving the pain. This will increase the supply of oxygen and nutrient available to the tissues, accelerate the removal of the waste products, and bring about the resolution of inflammation. When the heat is mild, pain relief is probably due to the sedative effect on the superficial sensory nerve endings. It also helps to achieve muscular relaxation. Infrared rays also have a physiological effect on cutaneous vasodilation due to the liberation of chemical vasodilators, histamine, and similar substance, and a possible direct effects on the blood vessels. Stronger heating of infrared stimulates the superficial nerve endings. It has been noticed that pain is due to the accumulation of waste products, and because of stronger heating, the blood flow increases and removes that waste product, and the pain is relieved. In some cases, the relief of pain is probably associated with muscle relaxation. The muscle relaxes most readily when the tissue is warm. The relief of pain itself facilitates muscle relaxation. So the infrared radiation is considered a choice of Electro Therapy Modality for wound healing and pain among mothers who underwent caesarean.

References

Hopkins K (2000) Are Brazilian women really choosing to deliver by cesarean? Soc Sci Med 51:725–740

https://doi.org/10.1590%2F1806-9282.64.11.1045

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=16192541

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=10594500

Light & Water: The Fourth Phase

Light & Water: The Fourth Phase

Water has three phases — gas, liquid, and solid; but inside Dr.Pollack’s lab, findings imply the presence of a surprisingly extensive fourth phase that occurs at interfaces. The formal name for this fourth phase is exclusion-zone water, aka EZ water. This finding may have profound implications for chemistry, physics, and biology.

The impact of surfaces on the contiguous aqueous phase is generally thought to extend no more than a few water-molecule layers. However, Dr.Pollack found that colloidal and molecular solutes are profoundly excluded from hydrophilic surfaces' vicinity to distances up to several hundred micrometers. Such large exclusion zones have been observed next to many different hydrophilic surfaces, and many diverse solutes are excluded. Hence, the exclusion phenomenon appears to be quite general.​​

Multiple methods have been applied to test whether the exclusion zone's physical properties differ from those of bulk water. NMR, infrared, and birefringence imaging, as well as measurements of electrical potential, viscosity, and UV-VIS and infrared-absorption spectra, collectively reveal that the solute-free zone is a physically distinct, ordered phase of water. It is much like a liquid crystal. It can co-exist essentially indefinitely with the contiguous solute-containing phase. Indeed, this unexpectedly extensive zone may be a candidate for the long-postulated “fourth phase” of water considered by earlier scientists.​

The energy responsible for building this charged, low entropy zone comes from light. We found that incident radiant energy, including UV, visible, and near-infrared wavelengths, induce exclusion-zone growth in a spectrally sensitive manner. IR is particularly effective. Five-minute radiation exposure at 3.1 µm (corresponding to OH stretch) causes an exclusion-zone-width increase of up to three times. Apparently, incident photons cause some change in bulk water that predisposes constituent molecules to reorganize and build the charged, ordered exclusion zone. How this occurs is under study.​

Photons from ordinary sunlight, then, may have an unexpectedly powerful effect that goes beyond mere heating. It may be that solar energy builds to order and separates charge between the near-surface exclusion zone and the bulk water beyond — the separation effectively creating a battery. This light-induced charge separation resembles the first step of photosynthesis. Indeed, this light-induced action would seem relevant not only for photosynthetic processes but also for all realms of nature involving water and interfaces.​

In conclusion, you can think of water as a battery. It’s excellent to absorb and store energy, and it’s good to transfer that energy from water molecule to water molecule (picture the ripples that happen when you drop a rock in a pond). The water molecules end up moving closer together to stabilize themselves; they become denser and more viscous and store energy in the form of a negative charge. This is EZ water. It’s like a charged battery — it’s carrying that valuable vibrational energy and is ready to deliver it. Using light therapy infrared devices from Kaiyan Medical, you can make your EZ water. The other alternative is to sunbathe naked under the sun, but that can lead you to sunburns, so we suggest our devices.

Ophthalmologists: Light Therapy May be the Solution to Eye Strain and Declining Eyesight

Ophthalmologists: Light Therapy May be the Solution to Eye Strain and Declining Eyesight

As much as we're advancing in technology, we're paying the price of sight. More and more people are spending their working days in front of a desk, staring at a computer screen. 

Whether we’re at home or on the bus, we're glued to our smartphones or tablets, staying connected to the world around us. What we don't realize is that the more time we spend looking at screens, the worse our vision becomes. 

Staring at your smartphone, laptop, or tablet for too long can lead to tired, itchy, and dry eyes, eventually leading to blurred vision and headaches. There's actually a name for this; it's called Computer vision syndrome

Computer vision syndrome is described as vision-related problems resulting from prolonged usage of digital devices, including computers, smartphones, and tablets. However, other vision-related problems  stem from cataracts, prescription glasses or contact lenses, migraines, age, glaucoma, trauma, and more. 

But with the help of light therapy, it looks like there's a solution to eye strain and declining eyesight. Researchers from the University College of London published their study in the Journals of Gerontology found that red light therapy may help improve eye function through mitochondria and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) interaction.

How do the mitochondria and ATP benefit from red light? The mitochondria produce most of the chemical energy needed for all biochemical reactions within the body. The energy produced is stored as ATP, which then converts into adenosine diphosphate (ADP) or to adenosine monophosphate (AMP). For the human body to stay healthy, ATP is essential for the cellular process. 

Concerning the eyes, the retina ages faster than any other in the body, according to Glen Jeffrey, lead study author and neuroscience professor at University College London's Institute of Ophthalmology. Glen adds that up to 70% of the ATP in the retinas will decline over a person's lifetime, which causes reduced eye function.  

This is where red light therapy plays an important role in improving eye function and vision. It's believed that red light therapy increases ATP production in the mitochondria, improving and restoring cellular energy, keeping your eyes healthy and functioning optimally. 

In the study, researchers tested the eye function and sensitivity of 21 participants between 28 and 72 without pre-existing eye diseases. The participants were given a small LED light, which they had to look directly into the light for three minutes a day over two weeks. The results were extremely interesting. For those under 40, they did not see any measurable differences. However, those over 40 experienced significant improvements in their ability to differentiate between colors and in sensitivity of up to 20%. 

Glen explains that red light therapy "uses simple brief exposures to light wavelengths that re-charge the energy system that has declined in the retina cells, rather like re-charging a battery." 

Though there are further studies that need to be done, this shines a light on the power of red light to restore eye function. Prior to the study above, other studies have been done in the past; however, this is the first on humans. Yet, previous studies also proved positive effects on retinal performance and damage reversal. 

The future's looking bright for those who have eye issues and want non-invasive treatments. As Glen said, “the technology is simple and very safe.” 

With Kayian Medical’s MDA-certified and FDA-approved red light therapy devices, you can provide clients with non-invasive and effective treatment to improve eye function. 

How Light Therapy Enhances Physical Therapy Treatment

How Light Therapy Enhances Physical Therapy Treatment

Though laser technology started with Albert Einstein, the technology didn’t evolve until the 1960’s when a laser prototype at Hughes Research Laboratories in Malibu, California, was first built. However, its purpose wasn’t for the medical industry; instead, for the military.

It eventually trickled down into Hollywood when Sci-Fi directors realized its potential for visual effects. But, of course, it didn’t take long for other fields to jump on the laser light bandwagon, including the medicine and rehabilitation industries. From there, the medical industry began to understand laser light’s impact on the human body when it came to healing and recovery.

Low-level (light) laser therapy (LLLT) is used to treat various conditions, including pain relief and inflammation. Over the past ten years, research and technological advancements have fine-tuned low-level light therapy, making the treatment highly effective in providing pain relief and healing treatment.

What is Low-Level Laser Light Therapy?

Before we talk about its capabilities, it’s essential to understand how it functions. Low-level laser light therapy is a non-invasive technique that gives the body a low dose of light to stimulate cellular healing. Laser light therapy targets the specific area in need to increase mobility by reducing pain and inflammation.

Low-level laser light therapy works through a process called photobiomodulation. During this process, the light is absorbed by the body’s tissue, where the cells respond with a physiological reaction, promoting cellular regeneration. The light stimulates cellular metabolism to promote cell growth and the healing of damaged cells.

How Laser Light Affects the Body

There are a couple of ways laser light therapy affects the body. Here’s what laser light therapy does for the body:

  1. Light energy is absorbed by melanin, hemoglobin, and water. The energy dissolves into heat, creating a soothing and warm sensation. The warming sensation helps patients feel relaxed.
  2. There’s an increase in ATP production in the mitochondria through light energy, the cell’s powerhouse. With increased ATP production, more energy is available for the healing process.
  3. Light energy aids with the release of nitric oxide, which enhances the circulation of damaged tissue. Increased circulation allows for improved oxygen exchange, nutrient exchange, and waste removal.
  4. Light energy releases crucial chemicals that help reduce inflammation.

So can laser light therapy be used alongside physical therapy? The answer is yes. In fact, the two treatments complement each other perfectly.

The Perfect Pair: Laser Light Therapy and Physical Therapy

With patients experiencing chronic or acute pain, the feeling of pain isn’t the main issue. However, patients can reduce pain and inflammation symptoms through laser light therapy while undergoing physical therapy treatments. Laser light therapy is ideal for pre and post-surgical procedures and during rehabilitation.

Patients undergoing laser light therapy will feel warm and soothing healing sensations as well as an immediate reduction in pain after treatment. By reducing pain, patients will improve their physical therapy performance and reduce their healing time. Ideally, four to six laser light therapy sessions are recommended to patients to receive the best results.

Whether you’re looking to improve your chiropractic, dermatology, medical or physical therapy practice, laser light therapy can provide your patients with the extra care they need to reduce chronic or acute pain and inflammation symptoms.

With many laser light products on the market, you want to make sure you’re investing in a medical-grade laser light device for your practice. Kaiyan Medical manufactures MDA-certified and FDA-approved laser light therapy devices, ideal for various medical and rehabilitation industries.

How Light Therapy can Help you Manage Holiday Stress

How Light Therapy can Help you Manage Holiday Stress

If there's one thing that many of us experience during the holiday season, it’s stress. As much as it can be a time of joy, there’s a lot of pressures that come along with this time of the year. And now, the holidays come with yet another set of stressors that we're not so unaccustomed to: an ongoing global pandemic. None of us have gone through a holiday season during lockdowns and quarantines, making it stressful and difficult to navigate. 

With many of us unable to see our families, we are potentially having to spend the holidays alone, only seeing our loved ones over Zoom or Skype. It’s an unusual time we’re living in right now and it can bring up various emotions. The chronic stress we’re currently living in can lead to serious health problems, including inflammation, headaches, insomnia, digestion issues, and loss of sexual desire. 

On top of everything, the winter season brings SAD (seasonal affective disorder), resulting in many people suffering from low energy, depression, and appetite changes. So, as you can see, we’re dealing with a lot this holiday season, and it’s evermore important to take care of ourselves. 

Of course, the fact that we're separated from our families is difficult, and sadly, there's not much we can do about it. However, we can help ourselves find mental, emotional, and physical balance during these stressful times, and reduce inflammation stemming from stress in the body.

If you're suffering from inflammation and have experienced pain, heat, swelling, and discomfort, you've probably done some Googling to find the cause. As you know, endless search results point to diet, weight, and exercise, which are all valid causes, but they are not the only ones. But there's one main cause we tend to ignore: stress. 

What happens to us when we’re stressed? When we're stressed, our inflammatory response jumps into action and our body enters allostasis. Allostasis is the process of adapting to acute stress by producing stress-related hormones such as cortisol and adrenaline. In other words, our bodies go into "flight or fight" mode. 

This isn't necessarily unhealthy; this is part of the natural human response. However, the problem comes when we're experiencing chronic stress as our bodies cannot return to homeostasis. This causes the body to believe we're fighting for our lives continually, and ultimately causes inflammation. 

Naturally, in today’s world, you’re going to experience stressful situations. And yes, yoga and meditation help to reduce stress, but they don’t reduce inflammation entirely. So, what can you do? When it comes to bringing your body back to a state of balance, red light therapy works wonders.

If you've ever visited the doctor for inflammation issues, you've probably been prescribed nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or steroids. Though they're useful, they don't deal with the root cause of your inflammation.

Red light therapy does combat the root of inflammation by sending wavelengths of red and near-infrared (NIR) light to the skin and cells, cutting down the oxidative stress and enhancing cellular energy to boost your immune system, even preventing diseases that are caused by chronic inflammation. In addition, red light therapy also increases the cell's healing process, improving blood flow and reducing any existing inflammation. 

Aside from the inflammation, red light therapy also aids in treating seasonal affective disorder (SAD). Red light therapy’s benefits are particularly powerful during the winter season, as you can eliminate or reduce winter-related conditions such as inflammation and SAD. 

Inflammation is a natural part of the human body, but chronic inflammation can cause serious health risks that can significantly reduce the quality of your life. Therefore, we’re intent on helping people reduce inflammation at Lunas through our state-of-the-art red light therapy devices that are MDA and FDA approved and can be used from the comfort of your home during this holiday season. 

Winter can be a dreary and gloomy time of year, but that doesn’t mean you need to feel poorly, too. With red light therapy, you’ll be able to reduce inflammation, eliminate symptoms and get your life back. 

Can Red Light Help Supplement a Keto Weight-loss Diet?

Can Red Light Help Supplement a Keto Weight-loss Diet?

Weight loss is something that many people struggle with, and our modern day lifestyles can make it challenging to prioritize healthy eating and movement. We’re living fast lives, often resorting to highly-processed foods, and skipping out on exercising, all of which are the main contributors to weight gain. 

In 2020, the obesity rate in the U.S. was 42.4%. Though it’s often overlooked, people with a high BMI are at very high risk for cardiovascular diseases, hormonal issues, diabetes, cancer, and musculoskeletal disorders. 

However, in recent years, there’s been a shift in people’s mentalities. Yes, many are still opting for meal replacements and weight loss surgeries; however, others are focusing on eating clean and eliminating preservatives from their diet. Instead of doing quick diet fads, many are trying to change their lifestyle, even turning to alternative eating methods such as the ketogenic diet – a low-carb, high- fat diet that shares similarities to the Atkins diet. Essentially, you eat fewer carbs and replace them with fat. By doing this, the body goes into a state of ketosis, enabling the fat from your diet and body to be burned into energy. 

However, the keto diet does more than just help people lose weight. It reduces blood sugar and insulin levels, sleep disorders, seizures, and other brain disorders. It’s clear that the keto diet does have health benefits aside from weight loss. This diet alone has changed the lives of millions of people around the world. But wait...what does this all have to do with red light therapy? 

Before we talk about red light therapy working alongside keto, it’s crucial to understand the importance of natural light to the human body. Our bodies respond to light the same way it does to carbs, proteins, and fats. Our bodies are built to function with an optimal amount of natural light so that our cells can produce energy

We need light like we need fruits and vegetables. Similar to when we eat junk food, if we’re exposed to an abundance of artificial light, our bodies don’t function optimally. However, we’re spending more time inside than ever, meaning we’re not getting enough natural light. Simply put: it isn’t good for our bodies and minds.

So how do the two work together? If you’re on the keto diet, your body will go into a state of ketosis, which promotes increased weight loss, specifically in the abdominal area. When the body is able to burn fat efficiently, the body works better—this the same goes for red light therapy. 

Red light therapy strengthens the mitochondria inside our cells. The mitochondria are the powerhouse of the cells where energy is created. By improving the function of the mitochondria, a cell produces more ATP (adenosine triphosphate). With an increase in energy, the cells function optimally and are able to regenerate at a faster pace. 

Keto and red light therapy work to naturally enhance our body’s functionality as both operate to enhance the mitochondria. Keto works to burn fatty acids and ketones instead of glucose. With red light therapy, it decreases oxidative stress that slows energy systems. When using red light therapy during a keto diet, your cells are able to work efficiently as both increase energy, physical performance, and weight loss

But red light therapy does more than just enhance your body’s energy and physical performance. Red light therapy improves sleeping patterns by adjusting your circadian rhythm and helping the brain produce natural melatonin. Developing a regular sleep pattern on top of losing weight will only help improve your weight loss journey, as well as balance your hormones. Red light therapy also reduces inflammation and joint pain, which helps the overall weight loss experience. 


If you’re on the keto diet or considering giving it a try, consider easing into the process by supplementing with Lunas’ MDA and FDA-approved red light therapy devices to help aid your weight loss journey.

Pro Athletes Harnessing the Power of Red Light

Pro Athletes Harnessing the Power of Red Light

Originally from https://www.lunaspanel.com/post/pro-athletes-harnessing-the-power-of-red-light


Being a professional athlete is no joke, and when your body is a central part of your job, it needs to be very well taken care of. And even when athletes are doing all the right things to take care of their body, injuries are still widespread in professional sports; but it used to be that their career was over if an athlete was injured. But now, athletes can undergo surgery and pop back up on the court or field months later. How is that possible?

As most athletes know, a large portion of time is dedicated to repairing muscles and alleviating inflammation for the next game. Regardless of the sport, teams spend millions of dollars on professional physical therapists to guarantee their athletes receive the highest physical treatment standard.

The recovery process for an athlete is essential and a determining factor of how well they’ll perform during their careers. You’ll often hear the words “optimizing performance” when discussing the recovery process for athletes. Today, the recovery process isn’t just to heal an athlete but to naturally enhance their performance.

So, how do professional therapists optimize professional athletes’ performance and recovery? Well, red light therapy is turning out to be one of the most effective treatments for these high-performing individuals.

Professional trainers are always looking for natural ways to enhance their player’s performance. With light has proven to be a lead modality, many trainers and athletes use light therapy to enhance the body’s natural healing process. But how does it work?

When used, natural red light penetrates the skin and cells. When the light reaches the mitochondria, it stimulates the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). ATP is a natural energy currency in the human body. With an enhanced ATP production, cells in the muscle are optimized and repaired faster.

Hundreds of peer-reviewed clinical trials have backed up the results athletes see on the courts and fields. In 2015, researchers conducted a meta-analysis of placebo-controlled trials, and the results were astounding. They found that most clinical trials showed “significant improvement for the main measures related to performance,” including endurance and speed. And through this meta-analysis, it was concluded that “phototherapy (with lasers and LEDs) improves muscular performance and accelerates recovery when applied before exercise.”

However, red light therapy does more than recover muscle tissue. It also increases muscle strength, ultimately improving physical performance.

A 2016 study researched red light therapy on elite athletes and trained and untrained athletes. What was found was that red light therapy after training could increase muscle mass. So, not only does red light therapy accelerate the recovery process, but it also improves muscle strength.

But what about endurance? Being strong is only one aspect of being an athlete. Endurance is crucial when competing against an opponent. A triple-blind, placebo-controlled trial published in 2018 studied the effects of red light therapy on men and women undergoing endurance training on treadmills. It was found that red light therapy pre-exercise can “increase the time-to-exhaustion and oxygen uptake and also decrease the body fat in healthy volunteers when compared to placebo.”

Another study from 2018 completed by Brazilian researchers found that after their randomized, triple-blind, placebo-controlled trial on pro soccer players, those who underwent red light therapy stayed longer on the playing field. It was concluded that light therapy “…had a significant improvement in all the biochemical markers evaluated…pre-exercise [light] therapy can enhance performance and accelerate recovery…”.

Peer-reviewed clinical trials worldwide have all concluded the same thing: red light therapy works for increasing athletic performance levels. Luna’s red light therapy device can help professional athletes and the rest of us exercise regularly, recover from injuries, and improve our physical and muscular health.

Laser Acupuncture Treatment?

Laser Acupuncture Treatment?

Acupuncture under traditional Chinese medicine is an alternative medicine that treats patients by needle insertion and manipulation at acupoints (APS) in the body. Acupuncture causes collagen fiber contraction, resulting in soluble actin polymerization and actin stress fiber formation, affecting the nervous and immune systems. Besides, acupuncture leads to molecular changes at APs in tissues at the cellular level. The local physicochemical reactions at the APs send signals to the organs via the tissue fluid and blood circulatory systems for optimal adjustment of the body’s organs.

It is believed to have been practiced for more than 2500 years, and this modality is among the oldest healing practices in the world. Acupuncture is based on the idea that living beings have Qi, defined as inner energy, and that it is an imbalance in Qi or interruption in the flow of Qi that causes illness and disease. Acupuncture therapy is focused on rebalancing the flow of Qi, and the practice is progressively gaining credibility as a primary or adjuvant therapy by Western medical providers.

Laser Acupuncture

Kaiyan Medical has been working to create ergonomic laser pens to simulate the acupuncture process. Laser acupuncture (LA) — non-thermal, low-intensity laser irradiation to stimulate acupuncture points — has become more common among acupuncture practitioners in recent years. LA is a safer, pain-free alternative to traditional acupuncture, with minimal adverse effects and greater versatility. LA has many features that make it an attractive option as a treatment modality, including minimal sensation, short duration of treatment, and minimal risks of infection, trauma, and bleeding complications.

What is the Difference

In acupuncture, needles are inserted at specific acupoints, which may be manually stimulated in various ways, including gentle twisting or up-and-down movements. Besides, the depth of needle penetration is also manipulated by the acupuncture practitioner. The patient may report sensations of De Qi, which are feelings of pressure, warmth, or tingling in the superficial layers of the skin. Many theories to explain how acupuncture works have been proposed, including the gate-control theory of pain and the endorphin-and-neurotransmitter. Others have postulated that acupuncture modulates the transmission of pain signals and alters the release of endogenous endorphins and neurotransmitters, resulting in physiologic changes.

One clear difference between needle acupuncture and LA is that LA does not physically penetrate the skin. Despite a greater understanding of LA, it is unclear how non-thermal, low-intensity laser irradiation stimulates acupoints. The mechanism of LA may be entirely separate from our present understanding of acupuncture. Current theories postulate that LLLT could positively affect modulating inflammation, pain, and tissue repair, given appropriate irradiation parameters.

Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Lasers

Inflammation reduction comparable to that of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has been reported with animal studies that used red and near-infrared LLLT, with laser outputs ranging from 2.5 to 100 mW and delivered energy doses ranging from 0.6 to 9.6 Joules. Human studies have shown similar anti-inflammatory effects with LLLT, which may account for many associated positive clinical results.

Cellular Effects of LLLT

LLLT improves cell physiology by increasing the overall cell redox potential toward greater oxidation and increased reactive oxygen species while simultaneously decreasing reactive nitrogen species. These redox state changes activate numerous intracellular-signaling pathways, including nucleic acid synthesis, protein synthesis, enzyme activation, and cell cycle progression.17 LLLT also alters the expression of genes that can enhance cell growth and inhibit cell apoptosis.16 These cellular effects of LLLT might reflect its ability to induce long-term changes in cells and LLLT’s benefits for wound healing, nerve regeneration, and inflammation reduction.

LLLT Characteristics

Red and infrared laser wavelengths are absorbed by cytochrome C oxidase protein in the mitochondrial cell membranes. This absorption is associated with increased adenosine triphosphate production by the mitochondria, which. In turn, it increases intracellular calcium (Ca2+) and cyclic adenosine monophosphate, which serve as secondary messengers that aid in regulating multiple body processes, including signal transfer in nerves and gene expression.

The power density of a laser, defined as laser energy supplied per area (W/cm2), influences its energy penetration depth. A 50-mW laser with a beam size of 1 cm2 has an energy density of 0.05 W/cm2. In contrast, the same power laser with a beam size of 1 mm2 has an energy density of 5 W/cm2 — a higher energy density results in deeper energy penetration through the skin.

Energy transmission through the skin is also affected by the absorption of light energy by skin structures. Light wavelengths from 650 to 900 nm have the best penetration through the skin. Lower wavelengths are absorbed by melanin and hemoglobin, and wavelengths longer than 900 nm are absorbed by water. With a well-focused laser beam, red wavelengths (~ 648 nm) can penetrate 2–4 cm beneath the skin surface, and infrared wavelengths (~ 810 nm) can penetrate up to 6 cm.

Now Kaiyan has made LLLT easier to use. Kaiyan medical devices can treat multiple acupoints simultaneously at the same time.


Could Red Light Therapy be the Cure for Low Libido?

Could Red Light Therapy be the Cure for Low Libido?

We’re animals of habit. When it comes to intimacy, it’s a night-time activity. Published findings on The Daily Mail discovered that most people have sex between 9:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. But what most people don’t realize is that for improved sex, you need the light.

Low libido (sex drive) has been a physical issue for both men and women. In the United States, sexual dysfunction affects 43% of women and 31% of men alone. However, further studies have shown this is a global issue. A study with 5,255 male participants from Croatia, Norway, and Portugal found that 14.4% reported a lack of sexual desire lasting two months or longer.

It’s clear low libido isn’t an issue within one gender; it’s a health concern that both men and women grapple with. For women, one survey at Hackensack University Medical Center, New Jersey, found that 36% of women between 18-to-3-years-old and 65% of women between 46-to-54-years-old reported low sexual desire.

But why are we losing our libido?

A loss of libido is a common issue linked to both the physical and the psychological self. Physical issues linked to low libido include low testosterone, alcohol and drug use, medication, and too little or too much exercise. At the same time, psychological issues can include stress, mental health, depression, and relationship issues.

Where do many of these problems stem from? Well, it certainly doesn’t help that we’re living our lives in overdrive: we’re working more; we’re chronically stressed, and generally living in ways that aren’t natural to our species.

However, where we live also plays a crucial role. Andrea Fagiolini, M.D., said, “In the Northern hemisphere, the body’s testosterone production naturally declines from November through April, and then rises steadily through the spring and summer with a peak in October. You see the effect of this in reproductive rates, with June showing the highest rate of conception.”

Since our body’s testosterone production naturally declines during winter and spring, many people are looking for treatment. As a result, many opt for hormone replacement therapy. It’s a controversial treatment that comes with a heavy dose of side effects, including prostate or breast cancer, sleep apnea, liver toxicity, and cardiovascular events.

Are people supposed to adjust to living with a low libido if they don’t want to undergo a dangerous treatment? Of course not. Luckily, red light therapy has been proven through various clinical studies to improve low libido levels.

At the University of Siena, Italy, scientists tested sexual and psychological responses to bright light. They discovered that regular, early-morning use of light therapy increases testosterone levels and sexual satisfaction.

So how does red light therapy increase testosterone in the body, exactly?

When your body is exposed to bright light, it produces a chemical called luteinizing hormone (LH). The more LH produced in the body leads to a higher testosterone increase, said the lead researcher Andrea Fagionlini, M.D.

Other studies in animals suggested that red light therapy influences Leydig cells — the body’s sperm producers located in the testicles.

“We found fairly significant differences between those who received the active light treatment and the controls,” Fagiolini stated. Dr. Brad Anawalt, an endocrinologist and professor of medicine at the University of Washington in Seattle provides two possible explanations for red light therapy’s effect on testosterone.

Since testosterone levels are the highest in the morning, a lack of daylight can reduce morning levels. Dr. Anawalt said, “[So] exposure to bright light might raise testosterone concentrations, leading to improved libido.” He added that “many men, and women, with low libido, suffer from depression. The bright light that mimics sunshine may help alleviate depression. Improved mood results in improved sex drive.”

Red light therapy can increase testosterone levels and reduce some of the causes of low libidos, such as depression, anxiety, and overall fatigue.

Lunas red light therapy panels have many benefits — even on our sex and love lives — which is an integral component to our well-being.

Photodynamic Therapy for Cancer

Photodynamic Therapy for Cancer

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment that uses a drug, called a photosensitizer or photosensitizing agent, and a particular type of light. When photosensitizers are exposed to a specific wavelength of light, they produce a form of oxygen that kills nearby cells

Each photosensitizer is activated by light of a specific wavelength. This wavelength determines how far the light can travel into the body. Thus, doctors use specific photosensitizers and wavelengths of light to treat different areas of the body with PDT.

How is PDT Used to Treat Cancer?

In the first step of PDT for cancer treatment, a photosensitizing agent is injected into the bloodstream. The agent is absorbed by cells worldwide but stays in cancer cells longer than it does in normal cells. Approximately 24 to 72 hours after injection, when most of the agent has left normal cells but remains in cancer cells, the tumor is exposed to light. The photosensitizer in the tumor absorbs the light and produces an active form of oxygen that destroys nearby cancer cells.

In addition to directly killing cancer cells, PDT appears to shrink or destroy tumors in two other ways. The photosensitizer can damage blood vessels in the tumor, thereby preventing cancer from receiving necessary nutrients. PDT also may activate the immune system to attack the tumor cells.

The light used for PDT can come from a laser or other sources. Laser light can be directed through fiber optic cables (thin fibers that transmit light) to deliver light to areas inside the body. For example, a fiber optic cable can be inserted through an endoscope (a thin, lighted tube used to look at tissues inside the body) into the lungs or esophagus to treat cancer in these organs. Other light sources include light-emitting diodes (LEDs), which may be used for surface tumors, such as skin cancer.

PDT is usually performed as an outpatient procedure. PDT may also be repeated and used with other therapies, such as surgery, radiation therapy, or chemotherapy.

Extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) is a type of PDT in which a machine is used to collect the patient’s blood cells, treat them outside the body with a photosensitizing agent, expose them to light, and then return them to the patient. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved ECP to help lessen the severity of skin symptoms of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma that has not responded to other therapies. Studies are underway to determine if ECP may have some application for other blood cancers and help reduce rejection after transplants.

What Types of Cancer are Currently Treated with PDT?

To date, the FDA has approved the photosensitizing agent called porfimer sodium, or Photofrin®, for use in PDT to treat or relieve the symptoms of esophageal cancer and non-small cell lung cancer. Porfimer sodium is approved to relieve esophageal cancer symptoms when cancer obstructs the esophagus or when cancer cannot be satisfactorily treated with laser therapy alone. Porfimer sodium is used to treat non-small cell lung cancer in patients for whom the usual treatments are not appropriate and relieve symptoms in patients with non-small cell lung cancer that obstruct the airways. In 2003, the FDA approved porfimer sodium to treat precancerous lesions in patients with Barrett esophagus, a condition that can lead to esophageal cancer.

What are the Limitations of PDT?

The light needed to activate most photosensitizers cannot pass through more than about one-third of an inch of tissue. For this reason, PDT is usually used to treat tumors on or just under the skin or on the lining of internal organs or cavities. PDT is also less effective in treating large tumors because the light cannot pass far into these tumors. PDT is a local treatment and generally cannot treat cancer that has spread.

Does PDT have any Complications or Side Effects?

Porfimer sodium makes the skin and eyes sensitive to light for approximately 6 weeks after treatment. Thus, patients are advised to avoid direct sunlight and bright indoor light for at least 6 weeks.

Photosensitizers tend to build up in tumors, and the activating light is focused on the tumor. As a result, damage to healthy tissue is minimal. However, PDT can cause burns, swelling, pain, and scarring in nearby healthy tissue. Other side effects of PDT are related to the area that is treated. They can include coughing, trouble swallowing, stomach pain, painful breathing, or shortness of breath; these side effects are usually temporary.

What Does the Future Hold for PDT?

Researchers continue to study ways to improve the effectiveness of PDT and expand it to other cancers. Clinical trials (research studies) are underway to evaluate PDT's use for cancers of the brain, skin, prostate, cervix, and peritoneal cavity (the space in the abdomen that contains the intestines, stomach, and liver). Other research is focused on the development of more powerful photosensitizers, more specifically target cancer cells, and are activated by light that can penetrate tissue and treat deep or large tumors. Researchers are also investigating ways to improve equipment and the activating light's delivery.

How Red Light Therapy Combats Arthritis Pain & Stiffness

How Red Light Therapy Combats Arthritis Pain & Stiffness

When it comes to muscle and joint stiffness, osteoarthritis, and arthritis, the one thing in common is pain and inflammation. When suffering from joint and muscular conditions, a person’s range of motion decreases, and swelling and skin redness increase, making everyday tasks a struggle.

Many young to middle-aged people are unaware of these conditions as they’ve been labeled as conditions mainly for the elderly; however, things have changed.

Though these conditions are common within the elderly community, we’re seeing an increase among young adults. In the United States alone, 23% of adults — over 53 million people — have arthritis, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In other words, joint pain isn’t just for old age, as we once thought.

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) appears in every 8 in 100,000 people between 18 and 34 years old. Of course, no one — young or old — wants to wake up feeling joint stiffness, swelling, or pain every morning.

However, the old myth that arthritis is untreatable is about to be debunked with light therapy.

Naturally, a medical professional will have to make a conclusive arthritis diagnosis. However, once diagnosed, many people find home treatments to deal with the pain — like light therapy. And the people who are undergoing light therapy are receiving incredible pain relief from their treatment. For example, a study published in the Turkish Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation found that infrared light treatment on inflammatory arthritis of the spine (spondylitis) encouraged increased function and improved quality of life for participants.

But what’s the science behind red light therapy treating joint conditions? Red light therapy uses low levels of red light to stimulate a natural response to cell performance. The light penetrates through the layers of the dermis, entering the muscles and nerves. As the cells absorb the energy, they become more active, with increased blood flow to the treated area, promoting cell regrowth and regeneration. Through this combination of increased blood flow and cellular activity, it rapidly reduces inflammation and pain.

With the recent advancements in modern technology, those who have arthritis or other joint conditions no longer need to opt for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or corticosteroids. These forms of the medication come with serious side effects such as edema, heartburn, stomach ulcers, cataracts, bone loss, and elevated blood clots. This alternative non-invasive treatment allows people to choose a drug-free treatment that reduces swelling, inflammation, and pain through red light therapy.

A study published in the National Library of Medicine found that elderly patients who underwent red and infrared therapy treatment had reduced their pain by 50%. Besides, they found participants who underwent red and infrared light therapy had a significant improvement in function. Another study from 2016 saw a substantial reduction in pain and an increased range of motion after five to seven red light therapy treatments for Bouchard’s and Heberden’s osteoarthritis. These studies are only a few examples of how red light therapy shows results as an effective treatment.

A little red light can go a long way for your body, mind, and soul. More and more people recognize the benefits of red light therapy as a natural home treatment. For people suffering from any joint condition, red light therapy will reduce inflammation, eliminating joint and muscle pain.

But there’s more to red light therapy than this. It’s important to be reminded that light therapy also heals other ailments in the body. Red light therapy is effective for injuries, muscle recovery, cancer side effects, skincare, and depression.

With an FDA-approved and MDA-certified Lunas red light therapy device, users can achieve optimal therapeutic results by merely exposing their bare skin to the light for a few minutes per day. Healing yourself doesn’t need a lot of time or money; you need the right tools. Lunas light therapy devices have the power to heal bodies and minds all around the world.

Stroke Incidents & Red Light Therapy

Stroke Incidents & Red Light Therapy

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 800,000 stroke incidents occur every year. No two-stroke incidents are the same. Stroke patients suffer complications such as loss of motor skills or partial paralysis on one side of the body.

A person can feel excruciating muscle pain, contractions for long periods of time, or spasms during the recovery process. This muscle tightness is known as spasticity or hypertonia. Sometimes patients experience muscle weakness down one side of the body, known as hemiparesis. One of the best treatments for muscle spasticity and strengthening muscle function is physical therapy.

The recovery process is dependent on the continued movement of the affected muscles. For example, some patients are known to keep their affected shoulder tense due to pain from the arm remaining relaxed and hanging. This leads to more complications, pain, and tightness. Everyday tasks such as lifting a fork, sweeping a floor, or driving a car can feel impossible for some. While pain is felt in the shoulder, arm, or leg muscles — these muscles are mostly healthy. It is the brain circuits and nerves between the brain's connection to these body parts that are damaged and need to be strengthened. Often, stroke patients do not find relief from even the strongest pain medication. Regardless, stimulating the muscles and pained areas with physical therapy strengthens the brain's connection and generates the healing process.

The National Library of Medicine has shared a study conducted in 2016 on stroke patients and red light therapy. The study concluded that red light therapy “may contribute to increased recruitment of muscle fibers and, hence, to increase the onset time of the spastic muscle fatigue, reducing pain intensity in stroke patients with spasticity, as has been observed in healthy subjects and athletes.” Another study from The National Library of Medicine on the effect of Photobiomodulation by red light-emitting diodes (LEDs) on nerve regeneration concluded with positive results. It was found in 2010 that “red to near-infrared LEDs have been shown to promote mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. In this study, LED irradiation improved nerve regeneration and increased antioxidation levels in the chamber fluid. Therefore, we propose that antioxidation induced by LEDs may be conducive to nerve regeneration.” Red light therapy works well to stimulate mitochondrial functions in cells and nerves. It can stimulate recovery 4 to 10 times faster than your body’s natural healing process.

Physical therapy is necessary for stroke patients, and when paired with full-body red light therapy, there is the potential to assist efforts towards pain reduction significantly. Photobiomodulation or red light therapy stimulates cells and helps repair the myelin sheath covering nerve fibers to accelerate their healing process and can have a positive effect on repairing broken neural pathways in the brain disrupted by stroke incidents.

In Kaiyan Medical, we develop all types of light therapy devices. We believe in the holistic approach to balance your body.

References

https://www.stroke.org.uk/sites/default/files/pain_after_stroke.pdf

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27299571/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20358337/#:~:text=Red%20to%20near%2Dinfrared%20LEDs,be%20conducive%20to%20nerve%20regeneration.

Story - Green Light for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

Story - Green Light for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

Paul Hamernik says that “green light” laser surgery has meant he can enjoy his life again. As a stock car racer, Paul Hamernik thought his frequent restroom breaks were an occupational hazard. He accepted that his bladder was small, and his nerves ran wild — until he learned his PSA level was increasing.

“PSA, or prostate-specific antigen, is a normal substance produced by the prostate, usually found in an increased amount in the blood of men who have prostate cancer, infection or inflammation of the prostate, and benign prostatic hyperplasia,” explains Lance Mynderse, M.D., a urologist at Mayo Clinic in Rochester.

“My local doctor suggested I go to Mayo and be evaluated,” says Paul. “He said Mayo had advanced tests and procedures to diagnose and treat prostate conditions that weren’t widely available.”

Fortunately, Paul didn’t have prostate cancer. But, because of his age and PSA level, the clinic invited him to participate in a pharmaceutical trial studying the effect of dutasteride in preventing prostate cancer in men with elevated PSA levels.

“I didn’t know anything about the drug, but I wanted to help advance medical science, so I decided to enroll,” says Paul. “I’ve always been proactive with my health. That’s why I started having my PSA tested early.”

During the four-year, double-blind study, Paul took a medicine — the drug or a placebo — every day. Half-way through the study, he had a prostate biopsy and urine flow analysis.

“I remember having an ultrasound on my bladder after emptying it,” recalls Paul. “The technician thought the ultrasound machine wasn’t working, and she went to get help.”

The equipment was working, and what the technician initially saw proved accurate. Paul’s bladder was holding three times the amount of urine that it should. It had become distended, and he was unable to empty it.

“If I hadn’t been in this clinical trial, being monitored the way I was, this urine flow problem probably would not have been diagnosed until after my kidneys were involved,” says Paul.

“Paul’s bladder problem was caused by an enlarged prostate, which often leads to bladder outlet obstruction and restriction of urine flow,” says Dr. Mynderse. “Paul’s condition was benign prostatic hyperplasia or BPH — a natural aging process that happens in all men.” While all men experience BPH, not all have symptoms — and certainly not as severe as Paul.

This clinical trial identified a problem that normal healthcare wouldn’t have found since Paul didn’t have any complaints, and a urine flow analysis wouldn’t normally be done. Unfortunately, Paul wasn’t a candidate for surgery when his enlarged prostate was diagnosed because his bladder had lost function. “When the bladder becomes that enlarged, it loses much of its elasticity and squeeze,” explains Dr. Mynderse.

At that point, reducing the size of the prostate might not help, as the bladder still can’t empty if it’s not capable of squeezing, even when you eliminate the prostate obstruction. “Therefore, we needed to ensure bladder function would return before scheduling surgery,” says Dr. Mynderse.

What this meant for Paul was regular self-catheterization five times per day. “I was terribly bummed,” says Paul. “First, it’s challenging to find a sterile environment & many places aren’t accommodating.” Paul’s employer offered a special restroom, and he learned some other tricks that helped but didn’t change his situation.

“I ended up clinically depressed because the catheter interfered with my ability to race stock cars, which I’ve done almost all my life,” says Paul. “There’s no support group for catheters, and I felt alone and very odd.”

“Going green” with surgery.

Paul’s diligence paid off. “His bladder function returned, and we were able to schedule a special surgery called photoselective vaporization of the prostate or PVP,” says Dr. Mynderse.

This surgery is often called green light laser surgery because it emits a highly visible green light. “The green light is created by lithium triborate, a chemical used as the lasing medium,” says Dr. Mynderse.

Mayo Clinic urologists pioneered the use of laser energy to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia in the 90s. In fact, Mayo’s Department of Urology is the” green light” laser's birthplace to treat BPH. Today, Mayo Clinic is only one of a handful of medical centers in the U.S. that are considered “Centers of Excellence” using PVP laser therapy to treat BPH.

“During the surgery, we vaporize the prostate through an instrument placed down the urethra, called transurethral — and there’s no cutting,” explains Dr. Mynderse. “We direct the light on the inner surface of the prostate, and there’s minimal bleeding. The by-products of the light energy interaction with the prostate and hemoglobin are bubbles and fine debris.”

Imagine the prostate as an orange. The laser vaporizes or shrinks the fruit or tissue occupying the core and leaves the rind intact. The procedure is performed on an outpatient basis, under anesthesia. “After 12 hours, we remove the catheter, and the patient can urinate immediately,” says Dr. Mynderse. “This is a significant shift in inpatient treatment from the historical standard TURP method.”

Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) has been the gold standard surgical treatment for enlarged prostate for decades. However, up to 25% of patients experience complications after TURP, including excessive bleeding, urinary incontinence, and sexual impotence. TURP also subjects patients to risks inherent in any surgical procedure and a hospital stay of 1 to 3 days and a 4 to 6 weeks recovery time.

“I left the hospital the same day and with no pain,” says Paul. “Dr. Mynderse is my hero because he got rid of my catheter, and I enjoy life the way I use to.”


References

https://sharing.mayoclinic.org/2012/12/18/green-light-laser-surgery-treats-bph/

Hyperbaric Chambers  - Oxygen Therapy

Hyperbaric Chambers - Oxygen Therapy

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy involves breathing pure oxygen in a pressurized environment. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is a well-established treatment for decompression sickness, potential risk of scuba diving. Other conditions treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy include serious infections, bubbles of air in your blood vessels, and wounds that may not heal due to diabetes or radiation injury.

In a hyperbaric oxygen therapy chamber, the air pressure is increased two to three times higher than normal air pressure. Under these conditions, your lungs can gather much more oxygen than would be possible breathing pure oxygen at normal air pressure.

When your blood carries this extra oxygen throughout your body, this helps fight bacteria and stimulate the release of substances called growth factors and stem cells, which promote healing.

Your body’s tissues need an adequate supply of oxygen to function. When tissue is injured, it requires even more oxygen to survive. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy increases the amount of oxygen your blood can carry. With repeated scheduled treatments, the temporary extra high oxygen levels encourage normal tissue oxygen levels, even after the therapy is completed.

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is used to treat several medical conditions. And medical institutions use it in different ways. Your doctor may suggest hyperbaric oxygen therapy if you have one of the following conditions:

  • Severe anemia
  • Brain abscess
  • Bubbles of air in your blood vessels (arterial gas embolism)
  • Burns
  • Carbon monoxide poisoning
  • Crushing injury
  • Deafness, sudden
  • Decompression sickness
  • Gangrene
  • Infection of skin or bone that causes tissue death
  • Non-healing wounds, such as a diabetic foot ulcer
  • Radiation injury
  • Skin graft or skin flap at risk of tissue death
  • Traumatic brain injury
  • Vision loss, sudden and painless
Risks

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is generally a safe procedure. Complications are rare. But this treatment does carry some risk.

Potential risks include:

  • Middle ear injuries, including leaking fluid and eardrum rupture, due to changes in air pressure
  • Temporary nearsightedness (myopia) caused by temporary eye lens changes
  • Lung collapse caused by air pressure changes (barotrauma)
  • Seizures as a result of too much oxygen (oxygen toxicity) in your central nervous system
  • Lowered blood sugar in people who have diabetes treated with insulin
  • In certain circumstances, fire — due to the oxygen-rich environment of the treatment chamber.
How to Prepare

You’ll be provided with a hospital-approved gown or scrubs to wear in place of regular clothing during the procedure.

For your safety, items such as lighters or battery-powered devices that generate heat are not allowed into the hyperbaric chamber. You may also need to remove hair and skin care products that are petroleum-based, as they are a potential fire hazard. Your health care team will provide instruction on preparing you to undergo hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

During Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is typically performed as an outpatient procedure but can also be provided while hospitalized.

In general, there are two types of hyperbaric oxygen chambers:

  • A unit designed for 1 person. In an individual (monoplace) unit, you lie down on a table that slides into a clear plastic chamber.
  • A room designed to accommodate several people. In a multi-person hyperbaric oxygen room — which usually looks like a large hospital room — you may sit or lie down. You may receive oxygen through a mask over your face or a lightweight, clear hood placed over your head.

Whether you’re in an individual or multi-person environment for hyperbaric oxygen therapy, the benefits are the same.

During therapy, the room's air pressure is about two to three times the normal air pressure. The increased air pressure will create a temporary feeling of fullness in your ears — similar to what you might feel in an airplane or at a high elevation. You can relieve that feeling by yawning or swallowing.

For most conditions, hyperbaric oxygen therapy lasts approximately two hours. Members of your health care team will monitor you and the therapy unit throughout your treatment.

After Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

Your therapy team assesses you, including looking in your ears and taking your blood pressure and pulse. If you have diabetes, your blood glucose is checked. Once the team decides you are ready, you can get dressed and leave.

You may feel somewhat tired or hungry following your treatment. This doesn’t limit normal activities.

Conclusions

To benefit from hyperbaric oxygen therapy, you’ll likely need more than one session. The number of sessions is dependent upon your medical condition. Some conditions, such as carbon monoxide poisoning, might be treated in three visits. Others, such as non-healing wounds, may require 40 treatments or more.

To effectively treat approved medical conditions, hyperbaric oxygen therapy is usually part of a comprehensive treatment plan provided with other therapies and drugs designed to fit your individual needs.

The Frozen Healer - Cryotherapy

The Frozen Healer - Cryotherapy

Cryotherapy is a trend with a cult following in the recovery, wellness, and beauty industries. It can be used in combination with light therapy for better results. You may have heard people talking about it or seen celebrities or athletes posting themselves coming out of icy cold chambers on social media, but what is Cryotherapy? Why is everyone talking about it?

In its most basic form, Cryotherapy is simply the use of cold temperatures to heal the body. Using the cold to help our bodies recover from injury, inflammation, soreness, or relaxation has been used since the beginning. Putting ice on a wound or bruise, jumping in a cold lake, or taking an ice bath are basic cryotherapy forms. These methods cause stagnant blood to start moving again, promoting new blood flow, which brings healing. It is a fundamental, well-understood principle that has been widely accepted and used as a means of after the fact recovery but can be quite uncomfortable, inconvenient, and extremely inefficient compared to modern-day cryotherapy through the use of cryotherapy chambers.

Day by day

Modern-day cryotherapy lends from past cold modalities to provide a much more comfortable, convenient, and effective recovery through cryotherapy chambers. Cryotherapy chambers provide a quick, 2–3 minute private session of whole-body exposure to shallow temperatures in a dry, contained, breathable air environment. Add in some music, light therapy, and awesome fog from the cold, and it becomes a fun experience that completely distracts from how cold you just got!

The goal of true whole body cryotherapy is to expose as much skin as possible to temperatures of -166F or below for a short period of time (2–3 minutes) to create a drop in the external skin temperature of 30–40 degrees. The best way to measure this is to use an infrared temperature device before and after the session on the upper arm's back, measuring the two temperature readings' delta.

Effects of Cryotherapy

Blood rushing to the core is our body’s natural way of protecting our core organs from extreme cold. When exposed to freezing temperatures, blood rushes from our extremities to our core, creating a systemic response throughout the body that produces many benefits. Cold promotes increased blood flow, bringing fresh, oxygenated blood full of white blood cells to the body's areas that need it. Cryotherapy amplifies these positive effects and adds many more incredible benefits by activating the vagus nerve and causing vasoconstriction and vasodilation. The vagus nerve is responsible for the regulation of internal organ functions [NCBI]. The vagus nerve is activated by cold on the back of the neck and touches every major organ in the body.

Whole Body Cryotherapy is not just for extreme athletes or those with present injuries, either. The best practice is for healthy, normal adults (minors with doctors) to regularly practice whole body cryotherapy 3–5 times per week. It is important to maintain a constant cryotherapy regimen and not just use it when you feel you need it or are injured. It is a continual recovery modality that helps the body stay healthy and even resist injuries and illness.

Light to Manage Neuropathic Pain

Light to Manage Neuropathic Pain

Imagine that the movement of a single hair on your arm causes severe pain. For patients with neuropathic pain — a chronic illness affecting 7 to 8% of the European population, with no effective treatment — this can be a daily reality.

Scientists from EMBL Rome have now identified a special population of nerve cells in the skin that are responsible for sensitivity to gentle touch. These are also the cells that cause severe pain in patients with neuropathic pain. The research team, led by EMBL group leader Paul Heppenstall, developed a light-sensitive chemical that selectively binds to this nerve cell type. By first injecting the affected skin area with the chemical and then illuminating it with near-infrared light, the targeted nerve cells retract from the skin’s surface, leading to pain relief. Nature Communications publishes the results on 24 April 2018.

The Spicy Effect

By clipping off the nerve endings with light, the gentle touch that can cause severe pain in neuropathic patients is no longer felt. “It’s like eating a strong pepper, which burns the nerve endings in your mouth and desensitizes them for some time,” says Heppenstall. “The nice thing about our technique is that we can specifically target the small subgroup of neurons, causing neuropathic pain.”

There are many different nerve cells in your skin, which make you feel specific sensations like vibration, cold, heat, or normal pain. These cells are not affected by the light treatment at all. The skin is only desensitized to the gentlest touch, like a breeze, tickling, or an insect crawling across your skin.

Illumination vs. Drugs

Previous attempts to develop drugs to treat neuropathic pain have mostly focused on targeting single molecules. “We think, however, that there’s not one single molecule responsible. There are many,” Heppenstall explains. “You might be able to succeed in blocking one or a couple, but others would take over the same function eventually. With our new illumination method, we avoid this problem altogether.”

Touch and pain were assessed by measuring reflexes in mice affected by neuropathic pain in their limbs. Affected mice will normally quickly withdraw their paw when it is gently touched. After the light therapy, however, they exhibited normal reflexes upon gentle touch. The therapy's effect lasts for a few weeks, after which the nerve endings grow back, and gentle touch causes pain again.

The team also investigated human skin tissue. The tissue's overall makeup and the specifics of the neurons of interest appear to be similar, indicating that the method might be effective in managing neuropathic pain in humans. “In the end, we aim to solve the problem of pain in both humans and animals,” says Heppenstall. “Of course, a lot of work needs to be done before we can do a similar study in people with neuropathic pain. That’s why we’re now actively looking for partners and are open for new collaborations to develop this method further, with the hope of one day using it in the clinic.”

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Half a Trillion-Dollar Market  —  Men.

Half a Trillion-Dollar Market  —  Men.

There’s an emerging disruptor in the beauty industry as companies target a different consumer type to expand the half a trillion-dollar market — men.

Across the globe, men’s adoption of beauty use is already starting to take off. But the trend comes in many different shapes and forms. For beauty companies struggling to find new avenues of growth, it’s a huge opportunity to see whether men are looking for traditional grooming products, discreet moisturizers, beauty balms, or popular light therapy.

According to Allied Market Research, the men’s personal care industry is predicted to hit $166 billion by 2022. According to market researcher NPD Group, just last year, men’s skin-care products alone saw a more than 7% jump in sales and with the category currently valued at $122 million.

“In recent years, the notion that men can’t or shouldn’t be using skin-care products or caring more in general about all aspects of their appearance has been receding,”

Said Andrew Stablein, a research analyst at Euromonitor International, in a research note.

The success of digitally native brands catered directly to men such as Harry’s and popular subscription service Dollar Shave Club reveal

“the average men’s grooming routine isn’t about just shaving, but can be aided by using skin-care products,”

Stablein said.

Even high-end designers like Chanel have jumped on the trend, launching its first made-for-men skincare and cosmetics line known as “Boy De Chanel” last September.

“It seems that mass players are trying to expand their market and gain share in a slowing market by growing their user base,”

Said Alison Gaither, beauty and personal care analyst at Mintel.

This includes tutorials from U.K. makeup artist Charlotte Tilbury and Rihanna’s Fenty brand, which have both put out instructions for guys who want to use makeup subtly for a more groomed appearance.

According to Coresight Research, the Asia Pacific market is now one of the fastest-growing regions for men’s grooming and cosmetic product use. Jason Chen, general manager for Chinese online retail site Tmall, told Coresight that “supply cannot meet the demand for male make-up products across China.”

However, recent data suggests the new generation of beauty consumers prefer a non-binary approach altogether. According to NPD’s iGen Beauty Consumer report, nearly 40% of adults aged 18–22 have shown interest in gender-neutral beauty products and holistic products.

“There are so many … [people] growing up with the idea that you’re not tied to the gender you’re born with,”

Said Larissa Jensen, a beauty industry analyst at NPD.

“Beauty is no longer what you’re putting out as ‘ideal beauty.’ Beauty can be anything, anyone, and any gender.”

In 2016, shortly after Coty acquired CoverGirl, the brand made history with its first-ever “CoverBoy” featuring popular YouTube makeup artist James Charles.

Charles recently found himself in a very public spat with Tati Westbrook, another YouTube beauty vlogger. Coverage of the feud, which began after Charles backed a vitamin brand that was a rival to Westbrook’s own, has been widespread and shows the influence these internet personalities have and how the business has evolved over the past two years.

While Charles may be having his struggles now, as he has lost millions of subscribers, the attention he originally received from CoverGirl sparked similar collaborations by major brands including L’Oreal, who featured beauty blogger Manny Gutierrez, known under the moniker Manny MUA, as the face of its Maybelline Colossal mascara campaign in 2017.

“I think a lot of people misconstrue a man wearing makeup as someone that is transgender or someone that wants to be a drag queen, but it’s not that,”

Guitterez, founder and CEO of Lunar beauty told CNBC.

“I think right now people are still intimidated by the aspect of it.”

Gutierrez’s makeup tutorials and product reviews have attracted nearly 5 million subscribers to his YouTube page. According to a note by the NPD Group, one setting powder product saw a 40% surge in sales after Gutierrez promoted it on his YouTube channel.

“It’s all about inclusivity and encouraging people to be a little more inclusive with both men and women,”

Said Gutierrez.

“I think that as time progresses and you see more men in beauty, it’ll get a little bit better and better.”



Red Light Therapy for Enhanced Cellular Function

Red Light Therapy for Enhanced Cellular Function

The one thing we have in common with animals, plants, and other living organisms is that we are all made of tiny little cells. The intricate human body in itself houses trillions of cells. Without cells, there wouldn’t be any life on Earth at all.

In this article, we discuss cellular anatomy and cellular function. Here, we understand how light plays a role in the support and acceleration of cellular respiration.

What is a cell?

Think of cells as the basic building block of all living organisms. As the smallest unit of life, cells contain many parts, each with a different and specific function. The command center of the cell is called the nucleus that contains the human DNA.

As these cells combine to form into an organism, they become responsible for vital activities like nutrient intake, energy production, structure building, and hereditary material processing. They make sure that your body gets enough energy and nutrients to function 24/7.

What is ATP?

One essential activity that our cells do for us is by taking in oxygen and nutrients to fuel body energy. This energy unit that is converted by the cells is called Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) Energy.

The ATP itself is a molecule packed with high energy that empowers cellular function. ATP is required by the body to do every activity. Other cells that do more strenuous activities like muscle cells would need more ATP than others. The ideal optimal cellular function would allow cells to produce and use enough energy to achieve body balance or homeostasis.

How is ATP produced?

The mitochondria are the powerhouses of the cell. They are responsible for the production of ATP. Aside from cellular energy, this double-membrane powerhouse does protein synthesis, cell signaling, and cell apoptosis. ATP is produced with oxygen (aerobic) or without oxygen (anaerobic), the former being more beneficial because it converts more energy. Thus, 95% of cellular energy goes through an aerobic process.

Our cells go through a process called Aerobic cellular respiration to convert oxygen, food, and water into the body’s energy currency, which is ATP. This process is a well-organized metabolic pathway that consists of four stages. Our bodies take in nutrients from the food we eat for the first two stages to convert them into carbon compounds. Then for the next steps, these carbon compounds are transformed into the energy that our cells use.

How does light therapy support cellular function?

Light can sometimes be less attributed to improve our body’s physiology. However, light has benefits that go beyond aesthetic and technological purposes. Just like how light plays a role in plants' photosynthesis, it also benefits human cellular function.

Red light therapy from Kaiyan Medical composes of Red and Near-Infrared Wavelengths that aid in the Mitochondria's function to produce more ATP energy. It works by increasing the number of Mitochondria in our cells and by boosting their function.

The electron transport chain heavily governs the cellular respiration process. Red Light therapy has photons that can boost the mitochondria to function better through the Cytochrome C Oxidase. It plays an essential role in the cellular respiration process by improving the cell's electron transfer process. In this way, more ATP can be produced by the body for an enhanced cellular function.

As mentioned earlier, oxygen plays an essential role in the cellular respiration process. The infamous Nitric Oxide can take the rightful place of oxygen to limit ATP production that causes stress and cellular death. Red light therapy also gets rid of a harmful roadblock to ATP in the dissociation of Nitric Oxide and the Cox. The photons from Red light therapy prohibits the production of nitric oxide.

The effect that Red Light therapy does on our body is that by improving cellular function, our body can achieve these benefits:

  • Improved blood Flow
  • Increased Energy Build up
  • Enhanced Healing Response
  • Reduced Inflammation
  • Reduced Stress
  • Balanced Cellular Function

As you do daily activities such as eating, drinking, walking, or working out, think of the massive role that your cellular system plays to make these activities possible. In this way, you can put conscious efforts into improving your cellular system through a healthy diet and lifestyle and by integrating Red Light Therapy.

References:

https://www.healthline.com/health/red-light-therapy#how-does-it-work?

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5215870/

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/325884

https://www.britannica.com/science/cell-biology

https://www.britannica.com/science/mitochondrion

https://www.nationalgeographic.org/media/cellular-respiration-infographic/

Animal Wellness: Red Light Therapy for Dogs

Animal Wellness: Red Light Therapy for Dogs

Certified pup parents know pets could easily sense when we’re feeling sad, happy, scared, or sick. Our furry friends could probably read us better than we could read them. However, active pets are also prone to injuries, cuts, wounds, inflammation, and infections like human beings.

If you’re a pet owner, you’d always want to give your pets the best care possible to make sure they are healthy and happy at all times. Thankfully, medicine has innovated well enough to find more advanced treatments and maintenance tools for our canine friends. In recent years, pet owners and some veterinarians have been using safe, non-invasive, and high-tech treatments for pets and domestic animals such as Red-Light therapy.

What is Red Light Therapy?

Red light therapy has been utilized by the veterinary world to deliver similar benefits to pets, just like humans. Red light therapy is a non-invasive treatment and a form of photobiomodulation that alters animal cells' physiology.

Light therapy produces wavelengths of photons that the photoreceptors in the animal’s bodies can absorb. The light provides alteration to the animal cells that result in numerous benefits such as better blood circulation and natural cellular regeneration.

Multiple studies support the efficacy of red-light therapy to animals. A 2017 study shows how Red Light therapy promoted faster healing for dogs that underwent bone surgery. The findings were also complemented by another study that suggests near-infrared wavelengths promoted bone cell reproduction for dogs.

Red Light Treatment for Dogs?

When our pets sprain their ankles or cut their pads, their cells become damaged. As a result, their bodies need cell energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to repair damaged cells and tissues.

The photoreceptors in their body absorb red light. The light stimulates ATP production in the animal’s body that results in faster delivery of nutrients and better excretion of toxins. All of these processes are essential for the body’s healing.

Red Light also promotes better circulation as it stimulates Nitric Oxide production to help blood vessels remain flexible. Injured or damaged cells need proper blood flow for healing. Light therapy helps in the healing process by increasing blood flow to ensure enough nutrients and oxygen in the affected area.

Red light is beneficial for surface healing by helping tissues that are potent in hemoglobin. On the other hand, near-infrared light can work better on deeper wounds as it can pass through the animal’s body's deeper tissues.

Innovators like Kaiyan Medical uses the FDA-cleared Red Light Therapy pad that utilizes the combined technology of Red Light-emitting diodes that can penetrate the skin and infrared wavelengths that can heal muscles, ligaments, and tendons. Red light and near-infrared wavelengths are the ideal combination of surface and inner healing.

Aside from providing the cells with energy, the light also stimulates collagen production, which aids in repairing damaged tissues. Collagen is an essential protein that can help get rid of scars and wounds.

What are the conditions that can be addressed by Red Light Therapy?

Skin and Surface issues

  • Surface wounds
  • Hair loss
  • Eczema
  • Other Skin Conditions
  • Wounds and Cuts

Deeper surface issues

  • Arthritis
  • Soft tissue injuries
  • Ligament injuries
  • Post-surgery Inflammation
  • Pain, Inflammation, and Swelling
  • hip dysplasia
  • Tendon problems
  • Strains and sprains
  • Salivary gland problems

General Maintenance

  • Maintenance of healthy joints and Bones
  • Maintenance of healthy Cardiovascular system
  • Maintenance of healthy Digestive system
  • Healthy Vision
  • Prevention of anxiety

Light therapy can be your best therapeutic tool in boosting your pet’s overall wellbeing. As a general rule, light therapy is a safe and non-invasive option for treating minor issues and maintaining their overall health. However, if your pet is undergoing more severe health problems, it’s best to consult your veterinarian for a more conducive treatment plan. While red light therapy is not a panacea for all your dog’s health issues, it’s a low-risk and pain-free option to complement treatments and to promote overall wellness for your beloved pet.

References:

https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/islsm/13/1/13_1_73/_article/-char/ja/

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/vde.12170?deniedAccessCustomisedMessage=&userIsAuthenticated=false

https://www.thieme-connect.com/products/ejournals/abstract/10.3415/VCOT-15-12-0198

https://www.degruyter.com/view/journals/plm/1/2/article-p117.xml

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1053/jvet.1999.0292?deniedAccessCustomisedMessage=&userIsAuthenticated=false

How Does Red Light Therapy Relate with Ketogenic Diet?

How Does Red Light Therapy Relate with Ketogenic Diet?

Red light therapy is an easily accessible and affordable clinical device that boosts metabolism and increases ATP energy production. It is a non-invasive modulator of metabolism that delivers proper frequency, power, and luminance by shifting the mitochondria's function organically.

Ketogenic Diet and Red Light Therapy

A ketogenic diet involves the consumption of low-carb, high-fat meals. When practiced together with red light therapy, it can amplify your metabolic flexibility. It also helps cells burn more sugar and fat efficiently. Good levels of ATP energy production (empowered by mitochondria by converting oxygen and nutrients to ATP) can help prevent high-blood or low-blood pressure conditions. The process of creating ATP energy works best when our body and cells are well-balanced, reaching a state called homeostasis.

One thing to consider in following a diet plan is over-nutrition, which may lead to metabolic inflexibility. When over-feeding happens, the production of ATP energy may result in metabolic congestion. Red light therapy can help alleviate this metabolic congestion by focusing amplification of ATP energy levels. Insulin can mediate metabolic congestion by the fluidity between glucose, fatty acids, and amino acids. An important step for ATP energy production is forming the COX enzyme, which can aid metabolism by pairing oxygen neutralized into the water with high-energy electrons.

If the COX enzyme goes out of sync with electrons' flow, the high-energy electrons won’t effectively be neutralized into water. Red light can help regulate the healthy formation of the COX enzyme, efficiently oxidizing fat. The ketogenic diet triggers cells to insulin by stimulating ATP energy production by increasing metabolic flexibility, reducing carbon combustion, and helping clear metabolic congestion.

Significance to Healing

The chemical DHEA (dehydroepiandrosterone) plays numerous vital roles in health. It helps with the metabolism of cholesterol that produces hormones such as progesterone, estrogen, and testosterone. As we age, our levels of DHEA decreases, as well as the synthesis of such hormones. Low levels of progesterone can affect women in their peri-menopausal and post-menopausal stages. This is a function of the decline in mitochondria, which then affects ATP energy levels.

Low levels of DHEA may contribute to the insufficiency of adrenaline and estrogen dominance, which is common to middle-aged women at the peri-menopausal or post-menopausal stage. Women rely on the production of adrenaline and DHEA to keep their progesterone levels and prevent estrogen dominance.

Lower production of DHEA and progesterone can be an effect of elevated secretion of cortisol that is caused by acute/chronic stress. When high levels of stress reduce the adrenal glands' proper functions due to the decrease of synthesis of the adrenal cortex steroid hormones in the mitochondria, it results in adrenal insufficiency.

Based on health professionals' studies, when cortisol levels drop, it inhibits the synthesis and secretion of DHEA/progesterone, resulting in pathophysiological changes caused by stress. Enzyme activation and regulatory signaling can affect the fluidity dynamics between cortisol, DHEA, and other hormones such as progesterone, estrogen, and testosterone.

Red light therapy and ketogenic diet can mediate inflammatory stress and regulate the healthy production of DHEA.

Estrogen Levels

Estrogen is a master regulator of female metabolism. A youthful and regulatory expression of estrogen is the production of 17B-estradiol (E2). It modulates the menstrual cycle to ensure the healthy release of the corpus luteum, which secretes progesterone.

On the other hand, progesterone helps maintain a healthy uterus lining. When the expression of E2 is sufficient, progesterone secretion also increases. Having high progesterone levels means having lower estrogen and a lesser risk of getting diseases like breast, ovary, and colon cancer. E2 also contributes to potential partition fuel, orchestrating metabolic flexibility, and increasing energy levels that lead to optimal cerebral glucose metabolism.

The decline in the peripheral steroidogenesis of E2, progesterone, and testosterone is common as time goes by.

Testosterone Levels

A 12-week ketogenic diet may increase testosterone levels in men due to an increase in cholesterol and DHEA. Red light therapy also improves the mitochondrial synthesis of testosterone from DHEA.

For males, testosterone naturally converts to E2, but healthy testosterone levels stipulate a hormonal challenge to the synthesis of E2. An enlarged prostate can be caused by estrogen dominance when there is no testosterone/estrogen ratio balance. Having healthy testosterone levels may lead to a decline of estrogen dominance, as it is for progesterone in women.

Other Healing Benefits

Healthcare professionals strongly believe that red light therapy can be a powerful healing agent that may help prevent diabetic ulcers and lower chances of extremity amputations when practiced together with a ketogenic diet.

Diabetic ulcers usually result to lower limb amputations in the long-run. Studies show that diabetic foot ulcers and lower extremity amputations are increasing in number. In fact, having unhealed wounds can be alarming as the post-amputation survival rate for people with diabetes averages to only five years. Statistics show the urgent need to prevent, detect, and prove that treatments for lower limb ulcers should be highly considered. Red light therapy has been proven to increase the circulation of blood flow and healthier skin.

Innovation

Red light therapy and ketogenic diets are considered to be disruptive innovators in the healthcare system. Apart from the fact that red light therapy is non-invasive, such treatment shows great potential in helping lengthen the lifespan and improve people's overall health. Red light therapy also promotes a more affordable and accessible treatment that can be done in the comfort of your home.

Here at Kaiyan Medical, we offer red light therapy devices to help you achieve your health and aesthetic goals. To learn more about the brands and products we offer, please click here.

More References

https://perfectketo.com/red-light-therapy/

https://perfectketo.com/keto-diet-plan-for-beginners/

https://www.rejuvcryo.com/the-science/2019/8/14/article-the-surprising-synergy-between-keto-and-red-light-therapy-rejuvcryo-north-county-san-diego

The Benefits of Red Light Therapy in Treating Hypothyroidism

The Benefits of Red Light Therapy in Treating Hypothyroidism

Thyroid issues are a commonplace problem that affects all ages and genders. It significantly contributes to changes in mental outlook, energy levels, skin, and weight. Hypothyroidism has drawn much attention due to many cases that are left undiagnosed, untreated, or inadequately treated. As a result, it led to more serious problems such as infertility, heart disease, neurological problems, and high cholesterol and blood pressure levels. Not to mention, treatment studies for hypothyroidism have experienced a significant backlog throughout the years.

In this article, we take a look at the basic precepts of hypothyroidism and how Red light therapy plays a role in treating the thyroid problem.

What is Hypothyroidism?

Hypothyroidism is a chronic abnormality of the thyroid gland, demonstrating an inadequacy of thyroid hormones such as triiodothyronine and thyroxine (T4). Normal levels of thyroid hormones stimulate a healthy amount of mitochondrial energy production. This means that in hypothyroid cases, the thyroid inhibits a state of low cellular energy.

As a result, people who suffer from this chronic problem often feel unusual fatigue, tiredness, weight changes, and skin problems. However, symptoms can vary from person to person and may even be subtle enough to be left undiagnosed and untreated. When left untreated, the disease causes more irreversible neurological, reproductive, and cardiovascular problems. It’s also found that Hypothyroidism is found to be five to eight times more prevalent in women than in men.

What Causes Hypothyroidism?

Hypothyroidism can be caused by a wide range of diet and lifestyle issues. Some cases can be caused by a lack of iodine intake, especially in more underdeveloped parts of the world. It can also be caused by other dietary issues such as low carb intake, excess polyunsaturated fat intake, and alcoholism. Other typical causes include stress, aging, sleep deprivation, and heredity.

What is Light Therapy?

When talking about light, we often think of it as the first thing we switch on in a dark room or the bright rays that set up the mood. We don’t usually think of it as having bioactive properties, penetrating beneath our skin, affecting the way our hormones, tissues, and cells function.

In reality, our cells actually capture photons of light, just like how plants do. Light therapy, also called photobiomodulation, essentially means light (photo) changing (modulation) your biology (bio).

How Can Red Light Therapy Help Treat Hypothyroidism?

Red and near-infrared light therapy, backed by over 5,000 studies, has grown its significance in medicinal treatments throughout the years.

Red light therapy is significantly targeted for hypothyroidism because unlike other kinds of light; they have a greater penetrability beneath our skin.

In fact, a 2010 study found that 38% of patients with Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism who were given red light therapy treatments have reduced their medication dose, while 17% have been able to stop the medication completely.

Here’s how it works:

  1. It Supplies energy

Because hypothyroidism is reflective of low cellular energy in the thyroid, red and near-infrared light helps the cells work better by supplying more energy to your body.

They have a photoreceptor called cytochrome c oxidase that works by catching photos of light. Like how our food is being processed by our body for the mitochondria to stimulate energy, the photos of light also stimulate energy production in the mitochondria. The mitochondria are responsible for the energy production of our body’s cells.

  1. It Prevents Stress

Red light is also shown to prevent stress by averting nitrous oxide poisoning. This means that aside from helping the mitochondria supply more energy, red light helps the thyroid hormone by alleviating stress-related molecules' effects.

  1. It Breaks the Cycle

Hypothyroidism is a vicious cycle of having low energy availability and decreased thyroid hormone production. By stimulating energy production in the mitochondria and preventing nitrous oxide poisoning prevention, red light can potentially break the cycle responsible for hypothyroidism.

In Kaiyan Medical, we produce a medical-grade red light therapy device that is effective and non-invasive, ideal for supplementing hypothyroidism treatments. Our device has a dual optical energy technology that combines red light and infrared light therapy as an excellent spectrum for deeper penetration and absorption. You can now rise above hypothyroidism and maximize your body’s healing properties with our Red Light therapy device.

More References

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6247385/

https://drruscio.com/red-light-therapy-part-ii/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6822815/

https://www.health.harvard.edu/newsletter_article/treating-hypothyroidism


Speeding up Recovery for Athletes: Red Light Therapy Treatment

Speeding up Recovery for Athletes: Red Light Therapy Treatment

Athletes take exercise and training very seriously to maximize and improve performance. Whether you’re a competitive elite athlete or someone who’s just born to win every day, recovery can be one of the most neglected aspects of our daily lives.

Recovery: We hear it all the time from coaches and instructors, but it’s also one of the hardest things to do. The saying “Push yourself to your limits” happens also to have its own limits. Neglecting your training recovery aspect for optimal performance can take a toll on our body in the long run.

In this article, we show the importance of rest and recovery and some of the ways to speed up our body’s healing process, such as integrating red light therapy treatment.

What is Recovery?

After training or a strenuous workout, our body responds to strain, injury, or stress as a defense mechanism in inflammation. While it may sound damaging, inflammation is a natural response when our muscle tissue regenerates and grows from microtears. Going through the process is important to allow muscle growth and performance improvement. However, the inflammation needs recovery for your muscles to heal from too much strain or injury for it to maximize its healing effects.

Recovery is the process that your body undergoes to recuperate between training sessions or from the time of danger to its healing progression. Recovery works by giving your body time to regenerate muscle tissues.

Whether it’s a strain, acute soreness, or severe damage, your body needs time to heal. The time needed for the recovery process is also dependent on the severity of the damage/strain/injury. This means that the greater the stressor's intensity to your body, the longer the time you need to spend to allow your body to recover.

What are the Examples of Recovery?
  • Getting enough sleep
  • Resting
  • Cooling down
Why is Recovery Time Important?

Many athletes have made recovery time a priority as it assists in the healing process of muscles post-inflammation. Giving your body time to recover can result in an improved performance.

During the recovery time, the muscle repairs regenerate and strengthens to tolerate a higher level of strain the next time. In other words, taking time to heal makes you stronger and less susceptible to future injuries. Having enough recovery time helps in optimal performance and longevity by helping the athletes convalesce both psychologically and physically to train and perform better.

By doing this, you can prevent future chronic problems, decreased sports performance, increased risk of injuries, or fatigue caused by inadequate healing.

What are the Ways to Speed Recovery?

1. Plan Your Rest Time

Planning your rest schedule and duration involves many factors such as the intensity of your activity, your age, and your skill level in sports/pieces of training. You may need less time to recover or more, depending on your personal needs. As a general rule, for medium to intense workouts/training, it is prescribed to maintain a healthy duration of 45 hours in between training.

Pro tip: Engage in Active Recovery

If you’re not suffering from an injury or severe damage, it’s important to incorporate active recovery periods during your recovery time so your body can maintain its active state.

Proper blood circulation is important in the recovery process. When the body gets injured, the body responds by dilating blood cells to speed up blood flow. Active recovery helps maintain good blood circulation and removes lactic acid out of inflamed muscles. Active recovery activities involve light physical movements such as stretching or yoga to allow proper blood flow and help your muscles recover and adapt better.

2. Get Enough Sleep

The Human Growth Hormone (HGH) is at its peak at night as we sleep. This hormone is responsible for tissue repair and recovery. This is why the key to a speedy recovery is to make you get a good REM sleep at the right time during your recovery period. Make sure to get a minimum of 7 hours of sleep at night to ensure that your body gets enough rest that it needs and to avoid any future complications. Lack of sleep can deter the process of muscle recovery.

Pro tip: Don’t be scared of having a few extra hours

Especially when you are suffering from intense strain/injury, it’s important to sneak in a few extra hours of sleep within your recovery period. In fact, a 2018 study suggests that sleep extension, a form of sleep intervention, can significantly contribute to the success of an athlete’s recovery. One way to ensure you get a significant amount of rest is to make sure your body has a healthy circadian rhythm. If you’re worried that you’re having trouble sleeping at night, there are many ways to improve your circadian clock- including red light therapy.

3. Refuel your Body

A healthy diet is also one of the great pillars of health. The nutrients you take in play a great role in your body’s function to cooperate with the recovery process. Minimize processed foods that may contain too much salt, sweets, and alcohol. These types of food may promote inflammation and dehydration, which can hinder the recovery process. Make sure to eat a balance recommended diet of whole foods.

Have an evaluation with a licensed dietitian or nutritionist to assess your nutritional needs. Assessment may vary depending on different factors such as weight, BMI, and activity level.

Pro tip: Focus on your Protein Intake

Protein is the key macronutrient that is responsible for muscle building and repair. It has amino acids that are metabolized by your body to ease muscle inflammation and build stronger muscles. Skip gulping on those protein supplements and focus instead on taking protein from whole foods such as lean meat, eggs, and cheese.

4. Listen to your Body

There can be all kinds of rules in recovery to maximize healing, but you can’t go wrong with paying attention to your body’s signals. Often, your body’s responses can be neglected. However, overlooking these signals can result in overtraining, which puts your body at risk of having more problems in the long run.

Despite your recovery time or period, if your body signals indicate pain and soreness, it’s important to give it time to recover better to address the issue. Aside from obvious physiological signs, pay attention to your heart rate variability, indicating your body’s adaptability to stress and your overall cardiovascular fitness.

5. Incorporate Red Light Therapy

Thanks to innovative medical devices, athletes and trainers have utilized more advanced healing modalities like red light therapy. Red Light Therapy is a popular, non-invasive, and effective light therapy treatment that can improve blood circulation essential for tissue and muscle recovery. It works by using LED to deliver wavelengths that deeply penetrates the skin and cells.

Integrating red light therapy in your recovery process can speed up muscle repair and minimize pain and swelling. The therapy accelerates the healing process by enhancing macrophage activity responsible for the white blood cell’s healing and anti-inflammatory response.

Pro tip: Try using Light Therapy Body Pad

Kaiyan Medical’s Light Therapy Body pad utilizes a high-end, medical-grade dual optical energy pad that uses 30 pieces of red light and 30 pieces of infrared light. The therapy's duality promotes deep treatment by treating injured skin surface while repairing deeper muscle, bones, tissue, and joint damage. The therapy pad is specially made with a broader light spectrum to increase absorption and penetration so you can maximize the treatment’s benefits. It’s a safe, non-invasive treatment that you can add to your recovery process so you can get back in the game stronger than ever.

Recovery and Rest are just as important as optimizing and improving performance. Allowing your body to maximize its natural healing processes can improve performance and overall better physical and mental health.

More References

Ratamess NA, Alvar BA, Kibler WB, Kraemer WJ, Triplett NT. American College of Sports Medicine position stand. Progression models in resistance training for healthy adults. Med Sci Sports Exerc 2009.

Garber CE, Blissmer B, Deschenes MR et al. American College of Sports Medicine position stand. Quantity and quality of exercise for developing and maintaining cardiorespiratory, musculoskeletal, and neuromotor fitness in apparently healthy adults: guidance for prescribing exercise. Med Sci Sports Exerc 2011.

Michael Kellmann, Maurizio Bertollo, et al. Recovery and Performance in Sport: Consensus Statement. Int J Sports Physiol Perform. 2018 Feb 1.

So-Ichiro Fukada, Takayuki Akimoto, Athanasia Sotiropoulos. Role of damage and management in muscle hypertrophy: Different muscle stem cells' behaviors in regeneration and hypertrophy. Biochim Biophys Acta Mol Cell Res. 2020 Sep.

Daniel J Plews, Paul B Laursen, et al. Training adaptation and heart rate variability in elite endurance athletes: opening the door to effective monitoring. Sports Med. 2013 Sep.

Michael R. Irwin, Richard Olmstead, Judith E. Carroll. Sleep Disturbance, Sleep Duration, and Inflammation: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies and Experimental Sleep Deprivation. Biol Psychiatry. 2016 Jul 1; 80(1): 40–52.

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/247927

https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/heart-rate-variability-new-way-track-well-2017112212789

https://www.webmd.com/men/features/benefits-protein#1

How Saunas and Red Light Therapy are Distinct but Complementing

How Saunas and Red Light Therapy are Distinct but Complementing

Saunas and red light therapy devices are clinically-proven treatments that complement each other wonderfully, even if they depend on distinct biological mechanisms to yield various natural health and aesthetic benefits.

In this article, we’ll focus on how things work for red light therapy and the distinctions of traditional saunas, and what you can actually gain by availing of either of them.

What You Need to Know About Saunas

Saunas can make your body’s core temperature hotter by supplying sufficient heat throughout your body. It has been a part of traditional medicine for various centuries, as the old century folks realized the health benefits of sweating. Although there are multiple types of saunas, two of them are the most popular:

  1. Traditional Convection Saunas

When you think of saunas, this is the first scenario that comes to mind: hot and steamy. This type of sauna requires more energy as it delivers heat to the atmosphere, warming the air inside the sauna, and distributes heat in the body. Traditional convection saunas can maintain air temperatures between 170–200°F and are an ideal type of sauna for general use. It is important to comprehend the different temperatures required for specific health concerns since being exposed to heat more than what has required triggers a warning for unsubstantiated claims.

  1. Infrared Saunas

The latest trend in saunas is the infrared saunas. Inside, instead of warming the air, this kind of sauna heats actual objects. Such objects include those with emitting surfaces, charcoal, and carbon fiber. Infrared saunas' effectivity is directly attributed to the temperature, humidity, and length of time your body is exposed to heat, even though many saunas claim to provide “full-spectrum” infrared wavelengths.

The farther the wavelengths are in the infrared spectrum, the more they are considered efficient and effective in heat production. This will be thoroughly discussed later, but the general gist is that heat supplementation is the primary purpose of saunas, convection, and infrared.

On the other hand, near-infrared wavelengths in near-infrared saunas generate very little heat. Most of the high-quality standard saunas use more effective heats from the far-infrared spectrum or IR-C wavelengths.

What are the Health Benefits of Saunas?

Inducing thermal stress on the body is the primary function of every sauna, but what does it really mean?

One of many biological responses from sauna usage is increased heart rate as well as perspiration. The essential body processes protein metabolism and is also affected by enough heat. Heat shock proteins are a special kind of protein that responds specifically to cellular stress from heat. Heat stress induction leads to natural health benefits like those we gain doing physical activities.

One experiment had participants sat in a sauna treatment for 30 minutes at 194°F for 3 weeks, totaling 13 work sessions. The results showed that the participants improved 32% in performance tests versus those who underwent sauna treatments.

Besides improving your cardiovascular functions, using saunas can help reap benefits such as detoxication, decreased depression, and lesser chronic fatigue.

Red Light Therapy vs. Saunas

What differentiates saunas from red light therapy devices is their mechanism of action. While saunas utilize heat for biological effects, red light therapy devices supply healthy light wavelengths directly to the skin and cells. Even when producing almost no heat, red light therapy devices help with cellular function improvement and support bodily balance. Simply put, red light therapy helps energize the body with light, while saunas heat your body.

How does red light therapy work?

Mitochondria, the powerhouse of our cells, is wonderfully affected by certain wavelengths of natural light. This helps in producing energy within the cells of our body, feeding photons to our cells from natural light via red light therapy.

What about clinically-proven wavelengths?

We feel warm when exposed to sunlight and other heat sources such as fire and hot coals because most of the wavelengths, including ultraviolet (UV), are rapidly absorbed by the outer layers of the skin tissue as heat.

However, unknown to many, some wavelengths have the unique capability of boosting your cellular functions and energy. These are those few wavelengths that can penetrate human tissues more effectively, having photons power-up your “cellular batteries.”

What to Look for When Buying Red Light Therapy Devices and Saunas?

One of the first few things you need to look for in saunas is the temperature it produces. You need to consider some other factors, including the type of wood, the heating unit (Is it conventional or infrared? Is it near far or full-spectrum?), finishes and stains, price, and more.

On the other hand, some of the factors you need to consider when choosing a red light therapy device are the device’s light energy output, light color or frequency range in terms of nanometers, warranty, body or treatment coverage area, the price, and the credibility of the company provider.

Light Therapy and Saunas: Friends with Benefits

Saunas and red light therapy devices offer a wide range of natural health benefits, which surprisingly go well with each other. They both support balance and health to improve your fitness and function but do not overlap with each other’s effects because of energy supplementation in distinct forms and wavelengths. What a great combination of complementary natural therapies!

Here at Kaiyan Medical, we provide different types of red light therapy devices for various medical, wellness, and aesthetic uses. To see our list of products, click here.

References:

https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/saunas-and-your-health

https://www.healthline.com/health/fitness-exercise/are-saunas-good-for-you

Scoon GS, Hopkins WG, Mayhew S, Cotter JD. Effect of post-exercise sauna bathing on the endurance performance of competitive male runners. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport. 2007 Aug.

Crinnion WJ. Sauna as a valuable clinical tool for cardiovascular, autoimmune, toxicant- induced and other chronic health problems. Altern Med Rev. 2011 Sep.



Let’s Talk About Optimal Performance Recovery and Red Light Therapy

Let’s Talk About Optimal Performance Recovery and Red Light Therapy

Performance and recovery go hand in hand when training or doing physical activities, regardless if you’re an athlete or not. In fact, athletes and their trainers utilize light therapy to improve their performance and muscle health and optimize recovery. To expound further, this article will tackle optimizing performance in fitness, improving the recovery process, and breaking down the significance of light therapy.

Optimizing Performance and Improving Recovery

Optimizing performance means paying attention to the body and how it functions, to live and train the body, and to find the best way to support its functions. Performance is not based on how hard or heavy are the weights you lift or the number of kilometers you’ve run; it is how effective your performance is and how you match it with your lifestyle (with the way you eat, drink and sleep).

On the other hand, recovery is about the effectiveness of the body’s healing process and the conscious effort of being in your best shape by enhancing your workout. It is also about utilizing the body’s tools and functions to effectively finish the jobs required daily.

Physical Performance and Recovery

Performance and recovery are correlated to one another. In exercising or training, if you want to improve fitness, workouts should be consistent. To get stronger, faster, and bigger, certain efforts must be made to increase performance levels. The recovery process is essential in health. It contributes to the workout; it is the downtime between training sessions or a break due to an injury or a period of healing from any exhaustion experienced.

Breaks like cool-downs, rest, and ample time of sleep give your body time to recuperate. They also allow healing for the muscles and tissues affected, strained, or damaged from workouts or training.

Performance is better when recovery time from soreness or inflammation is maximized. It also helps prevent burnout, fatigue, and possible injuries. If recovery is not made right, your physical performance may not reach its optimal state. Some athletes and trainers even make a recovery a priority over training itself. They believe that when an athlete recovers better than their competition, they will train harder in the long run.

Recovery is for Everyone

Even if you are not an athlete, you should know how to let your body rest, heal, and recover properly from any form of injury or physical activity. Everyone has their own activity levels to maintain. It may not be sports-related, but everyone demands effort from their bodies on a day-to-day basis.

When Recovery is Not Prioritized…

Regardless if you are an athlete, your body has limits. And if you push too hard, the body can break down and perform worse, especially if you didn’t observe any recovery time. Overtraining and pushing the body beyond its limits can affect performance in the short term or long term. Chances of injury are higher when you don’t allow yourself to recover, and it may also affect hormonal levels and the function of the immune system. The body needs time to process inflammation or any injury.

Inflammation and the Importance of Recovery

Inflammation happens when the body responses to danger or strain. It often takes place during a strenuous workout. When exercising, inflammation may indicate muscular damage. And when a muscle is “damaged,” it means that the tissue is growing and undergoes repair to get stronger.

Experiencing inflammation is a normal part of the growth and repair of muscle tissues. However, if you won’t set aside time for recovery, your inflammation may worsen over time and lead to greater health consequences.

4 Easy Ways to Improve the Recovery Process

Here are some ways that can help you improve your body’s recovery process:

  1. Body awareness

The body speaks when it sends signals to the brain. Sometimes, we dismiss these signals because of training goals. This may eventually lead to fatigue and injury. When you experience pain or when your muscles are sore, it is important to give your body time to recuperate. You must also be aware of your heart rate, especially at rest, as it may be saying something about the state of your health.

  1. Getting enough sleep

Besides giving your body time to recuperate, deep sleep also allows the body to digest and process fat and recover from inflammation or damaged muscle tissues. It is harder for the body to recover from pain, strain, fatigue, and injury when you’re sleeping less than 7–8 hours per night. If you’re struggling with getting enough sleep, try doing meditation or speak with a doctor so he/she can advise you about developing a sleeping routine.

  1. Eating a balanced diet.

Getting the right amount of whole foods, good carbohydrates, protein, and good fat can also boost your performance and recovery. Lowering your intake of processed foods, alcohol, and sugary drinks can also help decrease inflammation.

  1. Aiming for balanced and healthy cells

The performance and recovery of our bodies depend entirely on our cells. When our cells are creating and using energy efficiently, our bodies recover faster. ATP (adenosine triphosphate) energy is released to give us power in what we do. The process of creating ATP energy works best when our body and cells are well-balanced, reaching a state called homeostasis.

Light Therapy, Performance, Healing, and Recovery

High-quality devices are now available in the market to help athletes and trainers enhance the body’s natural healing and recovery process through light therapy.

Light therapy is a non-invasive treatment that uses LED lights to deliver red and near-infrared light to the skin and cells. It promotes efficient cellular ATP energy production and helps restore the balance of cells and tissues. Light therapy can be done before or after a workout. Some even do it both times — before and after a workout, depending on their goals.

Pre-conditioning with light therapy before working out can also help strengthen muscle performance. It can limit muscle damage and strain, lessening the chances of inflammation or soreness. When used after a workout, it promotes the speedy recovery of muscles and accelerates its adaptability to exercise. It also helps the body process acute inflammation after physical activity.

The Relationship Between Light Therapy and Muscle Cells

Muscles are composed of millions of cells that need to release ATP energy to fulfill the body's jobs, balancing exercise and stress. Light therapy helps improve cellular ATP energy, glycogen synthesis, oxidative stress reduction, and protection against muscle damage from exercising. Light therapy also helps improve blood circulation and oxygen availability, which allows better healing and recovery. It helps with the overall improvement of physical performance and faster recovery times. It also helps limit fatigue from exercising and strength training.

Recover and Improve Your Performance with Light Therapy

As discussed, light therapy promotes faster healing and recovery and soothes cells under stress when doing strenuous workouts, incurring injuries, and experiencing inflammation. When you set aside time for recovery, you give your body and cells what they need to function, thus improving your overall performance.

At Kaiyan Medical, we offer high-quality light therapy devices to help you achieve and maintain your fitness and performance goals. If you have questions about our products and the brands we offer, please don’t hesitate to contact us. We will respond to you as soon as possible.

The Effect of Green & Red Light Therapy on Hearing

The Effect of Green & Red Light Therapy on Hearing

Low-level laser therapy

Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been practiced for over 20 years in Europe and has been introduced in the United States as a treatment for pain and postsurgical tissue repair. It has been proposed that laser energy in the red and near-infrared light spectrum may aid in the repair of tissue damage. A proposed mechanism for this therapeutic effect is the stimulation of mitochondria in the cells to produce more energy through the production of adenosine triphosphate.

Studies in humans have investigated the effects of LLLT on both hearing loss and tinnitus, with equivocal results. Some studies have found an improvement in hearing thresholds and tinnitus symptoms.

The Subjects

A total of 35 adult subjects were enrolled in the study. Two subjects withdrew from the study due to loss of interest and/or scheduling difficulty. The data from three additional subjects were not included in the analysis. One subject yielded unreliable audiometric and speech understanding data, speech scores could not be obtained from one subject with a profound hearing loss, and calibration problems compromised data from the third subject. Data from the remaining 30 subjects were included in the analyses. The experimental protocol was approved by the Institutional Review Board of The University of Iowa, and written informed consent was obtained from all participants.

The Device

An Erchonia EHL laser was used to provide the laser stimulation. The device was a portable unit that consisted of a hand-held probe and a main body. The probe contained two laser diodes. One diode produced light in the green part of the visible light spectrum (532 nm wavelength), and the other diode produced light in the red part of the visible light spectrum (635 nm wavelength). Both diodes produced energy levels of 7.5 mW (class IIIb). The laser beams from both diodes were dispersed through lenses to create parallel line-generated beams, rather than spots. A second Erchonia EHL device served as the placebo. It was identical to the treatment device, except that the laser diodes were replaced with nonfunctioning standard light-emitting diodes.

The Groups

The study used three groups: treatment, placebo, and control. Subjects were pseudorandomly assigned to one of the three groups.

Initial group assignment was random with occasional adjustment to ensure that the three groups were similar in terms of number of participants, female/male ratio, mean age of participants, and mean pure-tone audiometric thresholds. The treatment group received the laser treatment protocol using the functional laser device. The placebo group also received the laser treatment protocol, but using the nonfunctioning laser device. The control group made similarly timed visits to the laboratory but received no real or feigned “treatment.” The study used a repeated-measures design, with each subject taking a battery of pretests, followed by treatment followed by a battery of posttests.

Analysis

Data were obtained from both ears of each subject. Since no obvious differences were seen between left and right ears, data from both ears were combined in the following analyses. Strictly speaking, this likely violates the statistical assumption of independent sampling, since the test results from left and right ears of a single subject are likely to be highly correlated. None of the statistical tests used in the analyses are robust to the assumption of independent sampling, and the effect of including both ears is likely to be that of artificially increasing the sample size, making it more likely that a statistically significant result will be found. All statistical tests were conducted using a significance level of .

Conclusions

No statistically significant effect of LLLT on auditory function was found, as assessed by pure-tone audiometry, speech understanding, and TEOAEs in this test. Additionally, no individual subjects showed any clinically significant change. It remains possible that other methods of LLLT could have an effect on hearing. The type of device used was not the best one for this type of study. Further research elucidating the anatomic and physiologic bases for therapeutic effects of LLLT on hearing are needed before further clinical testing is warranted.

More References

Clinical Study | Open Access. Volume 2013 |Article ID 916370 | https://doi.org/10.1155/2013/916370

ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01820416)

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Defeat the Migraine with the Power of the Green Light

Defeat the Migraine with the Power of the Green Light

What is a Migraine?

Migraine is a neurological condition that can cause multiple symptoms. It’s frequently characterized by intense, debilitating headaches. Symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, difficulty speaking, numbness or tingling, and sensitivity to light and sound. Migraines often run in families and affect all ages.

People describe migraine pain as:

  • Pulsating
  • Throbbing
  • Perforating
  • Pounding
  • Debilitating
Migraine Symptoms

Migraine symptoms may begin one to two days before the headache itself. This is known as the prodrome stage. Symptoms during this stage can include:

  • Food cravings
  • Depression
  • Fatigue or low energy
  • Frequent yawning
  • Hyperactivity
  • Irritability
  • Neck stiffness
LED Green Light: a Novel, Non-Invasive, and Non-Pharmacological Therapy.

The effects of green light on the brain have been researched and well-documented for years. The green light can reset the circadian rhythm through melatonin, the hormone that regulates our sleep-wake cycles. A special photoreceptor system in the human eye picks up light and elicits non-visual responses, sending signals to the brain to reset the body’s internal clock and altering melatonin production levels.

Long-time sufferers of migraines and other chronic pain conditions may benefit from exposure to LED green light. A new study, led by pharmacologist Mohab M. Ibrahim, M.D., Ph.D., found that the color green may be key to easing pain.

Ibrahim’s interest in studying the ameliorating effects of green light was inspired by his brother, who has dealt with severe headaches for several years. Instead of taking ibuprofen, his brother would sit in his garden and soak up the verdure of nature to ease the pain from his headaches.

“I wanted to see what is in his garden or in a garden, in general, that would make headaches better,” said Ibrahim, director of the Chronic Pain Management Clinic at Banner — University Medical Center Tucson.

In his clinical practice, Ibrahim also saw that his patients suffering from migraines and fibromyalgia had limited treatment options, and wanted to find a novel, non-invasive, nonpharmacological therapy.

In his study, which has yet to be published, Ibrahim exposed 25 migraine volunteers first to white lights for two hours as a control, then to green LED lights. He measured multiple parameters, including pain reduction, frequency of migraines or headaches, frequency of fibromyalgia flare-ups, pain intensity and duration, and quality of life.

On a scale of 0 to 10, with 0 indicating no pain and 10 the highest level of pain, migraine volunteers had an initial average baseline pain score of 8. After completing the green light therapy, their score dropped down to an average of 2.8. The frequency of headaches dropped from 19 to 6.5 per month, and the overall quality of life climbed from 48 percent to 78 percent.

“The best part about it … is the simplicity, the affordability and, most importantly, the lack of side effects,” Ibrahim said. “It’s a normal light. We’re not using a high-energy laser or anything like that.”

But if pain works through the nervous system, how exactly can green light, which works through the visual system, make people feel better?

New studies show that there are neuronal connections that span from the retina all the way to the spinal cord, passing through the parts of the brain that control and modulate pain. Green light changes the levels of serotonin and alters the endogenous opioid system, an innate pain-relieving system found throughout the central and peripheral nervous system, gastrointestinal tract, and immune system, said Bing Liao, M.D., a neurologist at Houston Methodist Hospital.

“The endogenous opioid system … allows the body to generate something similar to opioids and gives us a sensation of pain relief and happy feeling,” Liao said. “Research has found that, with green light, the receptors of the endogenous opioid system can increase production in the brain and body, and the hormone by itself can increase in production, as well. … It might be an explanation for why people feel good when they’re in a green environment.”

While more studies must be done to test the efficacy of green light therapy as a treatment for chronic pain, Ibrahim said he is trying to advance this therapy as a complement to current therapies.

“What this green light therapy offers is a non-invasive, non-pharmacological additional tool, so it might help reduce opioids,” he said. “I don’t think it will eliminate opioids, but at least it may reduce it enough. It may provide people just with extra help or extra relief so that they may not need the number of opioids that they’re on.”

References

https://www.tmc.edu/news/2020/02/exposure-to-green-light-may-reduce-pain/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28001756

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21182447

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https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7769534

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https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21172691

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2214647416300381?via%3Dihub