The Light for your Wounds

I remember how I used to come home with a bruise or cut every day after playing basketball in my childhood. Cuts and bruises were a part of the game, but my mother never took them lightly.

They may not seem like a tiny problem, but sometimes even a small wound can affect critical ways. It can lead to an infection as the cut exposes your body to external bacteria. This is why it important not to neglect the wounds.

What Happens When we Get a Cut?

Do you know what exactly happens when we get a cut?

In a small cut, the skin gets punctured, and the regular blood vessels get damaged. The effect is on the dermis layer. Whereas in the case of a deep cut, the impact is majorly on the tissues and the blood vessels break down completely results bleeding.

How our Body Reacts to Wounds?

When you get a cut, the body gets help from cells like neutrophils and immune cells. The section starts clotting the blood and reduces the blood flow. Antibodies, proteins clean up the site and eat the dead skin cells and other wastes.

Once the cut is free from germs, the skin growth gets started, and your body starts to rebuild the lost tissues and fix the broken blood vessels with the new ones. This repair work is done by cells called fibroblasts. In the last stage of wound healing, a lot of remodeling done to make the vessels and tissue functional again.

(Image source: https://askabiologist.asu.edu/)

The Light on the Wounds

No wonder science and technology have covered a long way to make human life easier. Now wounds can be treated with light therapy.

Yes, light therapy!!

That sounds out of the ordinary. But light therapy can heal your wounds by 200%!!

Wounds that Can be Treated by Light Therapy

Since wounds are of different types, wounds can be open or closed wounds. According to reports, LED light therapy can treat non-healing wounds, i.e., that doesn’t heal after 4 weeks. People with the following types of wounds can be healed from LED light therapy:

• Diabetic ulcers

• Venous ulcers

• Pressure ulcers

• Non-healing surgical wounds

• Serious burns

• Oral sores from chemotherapy/radiation

• Metabolic-disease-related wounds

• Wounds that repeatedly break down

How Red and Near-Infrared light Works for Wound

Light therapy a broad range of light having different wavelengths. Red light (620 nm — 680 nm) is visible red light, whereas Near-Infrared light (700nm — 1100nm) is invisible. Many studies reported that biologists have found that treating the cells with near-infrared light can grow 150% to 200% faster than cells not stimulated by light.

Biologically the Near-Infrared light boosts microcirculation and formation of new capillaries at the wound section.

Infrared light rays increase cellular energy that speeds up any healing process and penetrates deeper into the skin. As a result, the wound section receives more oxygen and nutrients to naturally help with the wound's healing process.

The light nurtures the lymph system activity. This assists with the detoxification process of the wound without overtaxing the lymph system and prevents lymphedema. The near-infrared rays also clean up the dead or damaged cells, making a clear blood circulation path.

Another benefit of Infrared therapy is that it helps release ATP (raw cellular energy), which gives energy to the damaged cells in the wound to heal better and faster (study).

Not only this, the studies have shown that the wound size also decreased by up to 36%.

Source: www.slideshare.net/amintalebi1/light-and-wound-healing

So, next time you encounter a wound, put a light on it!!

Let your cut heal through LIGHT THERAPY!

References:

http://www.jofamericanscience.org/journals/am-sci/am0706/36_5769am0706_203_208.pdf

https://www.infrared-light-therapy.com/red-light-therapy-wound-healing/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25363448/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25654197/

https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1054-660X/24/8/083001

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4126803/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24155549/

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