The Golden Healer - The Beginning of the Light Therapy

Light therapy, also known as phototherapy, has been widely used as a safe, noninvasive treatment option for several conditions, including skin disorders, insomnia, and depression. Today, light therapy is an FDA-approved cosmetic procedure and a skincare must-have, as it provides anti-inflammatory effects, promotes healing and helps increase collagen production, giving its users the fresh, glowing skin they’ve always wanted.

The History of Light Therapy

Some of the logic related to solariums began in China around 6,000 BC. At that time, Chinese architects began building homes to face south so that the sun would heat the interior, a practice that continues even today. While windows were likely no more than a gap in the wall at the time, you can still imagine families gathering around to soak up the light and heat. Finally, the trend of solar-heated homes began to catch on in Greece and even Rome.

If you’d like to geek out on this amazing health and beauty solution, let’s take a trip down memory lane and know how light therapy started, from the Chinese and Greeks to modern day discoveries.

The Greeks

Light therapy dates back to the ancient Greeks. The Greek city of the sun called Heliopolis was known for his healing temples that use sunlight spectrums (different colors) to cure specific medical concerns. This is also where the term heliotherapy, or the exposure to light, came from.

According to Socrates, the ideal house should be cool in summer and warm in winter and nowadays we still believe that. But, 2,500 years ago, in Greece, accomplish this was hard. No heating systems or any type of AC.

At that time, they ravaged the forest for wood to heat their homes and cook. Trees were also needed to fuel operations and build homes and ships. But, this was destroying the timberlands. Plato once compared the hills of Attica to the bones of a wasted body. Plato said:

“ All the richer and softer parts have fallen away…..and the mere skeleton of the land remains.”

With wood scarring and the supply sources getting farther and farther away, the fuel prices most likely went up. Fortunately, an alternative source of energy was available, the sun, whose energy is vast and free.

With time, the Greeks learned to build their houses to take advantage of the sun’s ray during winter and to avoid the sun’s heat during the hot summer. Individual homes were oriented towards the south and then entire cities were planned to allow citizens access to the winter sun. Citizens were saving money and resources.

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Greeks venerated the sun so they were happy to create their solar-friendly houses. Theophrastus, a naturalist commented that Greeks believed that —

the sun provides life-sustaining heat in animals and plants. It also probably supplies the heat of earthly flames. They believed they were catching the sun when making fire.

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It was commonly known that exposure to the sun nurtured good health. Oribasius, an ancient medical authority, wrote that south-facing areas were healthy places because of their exposure to the sun.

1903

Dr. Niels Finsen, a Danish physician and scientist, received a Nobel Prize of Medicine in 1903 for his contributions in treating lupus vulgaris and other diseases using concentrated light radiation. His award was well-deserved as he has opened new doors and treatment possibilities for the medical industry. Finsen first talked about the preliminary results of the use of ‘the chemical rays of light’ in 1896. When he said ‘chemical light,’ he meant ionizing light or light that produces chemical effects, such as ultraviolet rays.

1960s

Decades of research have shown that light therapy produces impressive therapeutic benefits to living tissue. In fact, in the 1960s, it was distinguished in Europe that treatment tissues gained therapeutic effects from single wavelengths through photo-stimulation. One good example of this is the practice of providing light treatment to babies who are suffering from jaundice or yellow skin.

1980s - 1990s

Light therapy became more popular from the 1980s to 1990s, as more clinics, medical facilities, and companies start to discover how powerful light therapy can be in terms of treating conditions and diseases. In fact the cosmetic benefits of light therapy also came to surface during this time. Meanwhile, some sports teams, athletes and physical therapists discovered that light therapy can help relieve sports-related injuries. It was noted that an injured person who undergoes light therapy can recover 50 times faster than a person who doesn’t.

2000s

The development of light therapy has become unstoppable starting 2000. More companies started to produce various light therapy machines and devices for medical treatment and aesthetic purposes. These equipment come in different lights and sizes to help address or give solution to different types of conditions. Some researches even found out that light therapy, using red frequency, combined with topical cream, can kill certain kinds of cancer cells.

Final Thoughts

We hope this quick throwback on the roots of light therapy has given you more insights about the effectivity of this solution both for clinical and aesthetic use. If you’re in need of light therapy machines and/or supplies, we can do the job for you. Here at Kaiyan Medical, we see to it that the medical devices we manufacture for our clients are safe and are compliant to ISO medical standards. You can trust that your machines will be manufactured using the right tools, at a safe environment. To learn more about our light therapy products and services, click here.

References

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Controlling Appetite with Red Light Therapy

It isn’t crazy to find comfort in food; and although overeating, or binge eating, often provides temporary relief, it can come with some real detriments to health. 

So what’s wrong with overeating? Sadly, a lot. Eating too much can lead to increased body fat and consequently weight gain. Remember: our daily caloric balance is determined by the ratio between the calories consumed and calories burned. If we consume more calories than burned, the body sees the excess calories as a form of fat. In the long run, this can lead to obesity, a major risk factor for cardiovascular health. Overeating isn’t something to be taken lightly.

While we’re telling you overeating is bad, it’s very easy to fall into it—trust us, we know. Why have a slice of pizza when you can eat the whole tray? However, overeating can play a messy role in your hormonal function. Eating too much food can lead to interrupting the mechanisms related to the ghrelin hormone, which has the role of stimulating your appetite, and leptin, which instead suppresses it. 

This happens especially if you overdo it with foods rich in fats and sugars. While consuming foods high in fat and sugar, it increases the levels of dopamine, the hormone that activates the pleasure centers of the brain. The body then comes to associate the ‘feel-good’ sensations with certain foods, generally rich in empty calories, fats, and sugars (as well as salt). This creates a sort of addiction since your body is connecting dopamine to your favorite food.

But what causes us to overeat? Well, the cause of overeating is different for many people. It could stem from emotional trauma or stress, and sometimes even boredom. Whatever the circumstance may be, the result is almost always the same.

When overeating, you’re more likely to gain fat, your hunger regulation will become unbalanced, and you’ll end up bloated, sleepy, and lacking in energy.

Chronic overeating can lead to both obesity and insulin resistance, two enormous risks for metabolic syndrome—a collection of conditions that increase your risk of heart disease, stroke, and diabetes risk.

The recovery process from overeating is usually neglected. The need for a healthy body and mind goes beyond wanting to “look good.” It’s about feeling good from the inside out. Life isn’t just about breathing and living, but to be fully breathing and living in the best way possible. While there are procedures that give easy-way-out options such as invasive treatments like liposuction, they rarely focus on the root problem. However, while discovering the root cause of overeating, there are non-pharmaceutical treatments that can significantly help the process. This is where light therapy comes in. 

Light therapy is a non-invasive, non-medical treatment that focuses on the body’s overall health. It’s used for a variety of conditions, from more serious to cosmetic issues. The way it works is through LED light targeted at a cellular level, penetrating into cells and accelerating ATP production. This way, ATP is released faster and stronger into the body, fueling cellular regeneration.  

With a higher count of healthy cells, you improve your body’s overall wellbeing. The power of light therapy is extremely strong and the LED light therapy health benefits are countless.

But how can light therapy help with appetite? Well, red light therapy decreases ghrelin production. This means that every time you’re using a light therapy product, you’re preventing the signal of eating to approach your brain. Simultaneously, it increases leptin, the feeling of fullness. This way, you’ll be feeling better and fuller while eating proportioned meals. The benefits of light therapy with the regulation of these hormones is how you ultimately balance your appetite;  you’re essentially reprogramming your body back to its original state, non-invasively and non-medically. 

Red light therapy for body at home is easy to incorporate into your daily routine and accessible for at-home treatment. Kaiyan produces MDA-certified and FDA-approved light therapy devices for essential at-home treatments, making it easy for you, or your patients, to deal with appetite control in the comfort of your own home, with a secure device and therapy of your choice.

Red Light Therapy & Vitamin D Production


Aside from nutrition and water, we need vitamin D to survive. In fact, almost every living creature on earth needs vitamin D to survive—it’s a crucial vitamin for all species. Vitamin D helps regulate the amount of calcium and phosphate in the body, which are responsible for the health of our muscles, bones, and teeth. 

In addition, Vitamin D fights disease, reduces depression, and aids in weight loss. When we lack vitamin D in our bodies, it can lead to a loss of bone density, which plays a significant role in osteoporosis and fractures. 

Naturally, a lot of our nutrients come from food; however, vitamin D is also produced in our skin’s response to sunlight. It wasn’t given the nickname the “sunshine vitamin” for nothing. Sitting outside (with sunscreen on, of course) can boost vitamin D levels in the body. By doing so, it can regulate moods and reduce depression. 

In one study, scientists found that people with depression who received vitamin D supplements improved their depression symptoms. While vitamin D supplements are an option, it can take between three to four months until you start to notice improvements. That’s a long time to wait, especially if you’re struggling with depression. However, there is a way to increase vitamin D production without having to wait months to improve. 

As we’ve discussed above, you don’t need sunlight for vitamin D production. You can either take vitamin D3 as a supplement, taking months to work, or through red light therapy, receiving quick results. So, how can you increase vitamin D through red light therapy? 

Before we get into it, it’s important to know that contrary to popular belief, not all forms of light can increase vitamin D in the body. The type of light used in light therapy devices is crucial. Natural sunlight contains both “red” and “infrared” light. These are the two forms of light that are needed in light therapy devices to increase vitamin D production in the body. 

Without red and infrared light, nothing is going to happen. These two forms of light have their own unique benefits to the human body. 

In one study published in Scientific Reports, it found that LED lights are more efficient than sunlight at producing vitamin D3 in skin samples. Tyler Kalajian and his team found that skin samples exposed to LED for 0.52 minutes produced more than twice as much vitamin D3 than samples exposed to 32.5 minutes of sunlight.

Another study focused on cystic fibrosis and short bowel syndrome patients who are unable to absorb vitamin D3 through food. The study used UV light to test whether it would affect vitamin D3 production in the patients’ bodies. It was found that the UV lamp emitted UV radiation similar to sunlight, producing Vitamin D3 in the skin. 

What’s amazing about these studies is that aside from showing light therapy’s effectiveness in producing vitamin D, they also prove light therapy is an excellent source of vitamin D during the winter season. 

During the winter, many people suffer from SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder) and are unable to find a vitamin D source. But, through red light therapy, users are able to increase vitamin D production regardless of whether there’s sun outside or not. Instead of using antidepressants or slow-moving vitamin D supplements, red light therapy is a fast-acting alternative. 

With Kayian Medical’s MDA-certified and FDA-approved red light therapy devices, users can get their lives back and be in control of their health with effective and quick light therapy treatment.


Light & Food Preservation

Consumers demand high-quality processed foods with minimal changes in nutritional and sensory properties. Nonthermal methods are considered to keep food quality attributes better than traditional thermal processing. Pulsed light (PL) is an emerging non-thermal technology for decontamination of food surfaces and food packages, consisting of short time high-peak pulses of broad-spectrum white light. It is considered an alternative to continuous ultraviolet light treatments for solid and liquid foods. This paper provides a general review of the principles, mechanisms of microbial inactivation, and PL treatments applications on foods. Critical process parameters that are needed to be optimized for better efficiency of PL treatments are also discussed. PL has considerable potential to be implemented in the food industry. However, technological problems need to be solved to avoid food overheating and achieve better penetration and treatment homogeneity. Besides, more extensive research is needed to understand how PL affects quality food attributes.

Nonthermal technologies

Nonthermal technologies are being applied in food processing as a viable alternative to thermal processing. Traditionally, most foods are thermally processed by subjecting them to temperatures between 60 °C for a few minutes and 100 °C for a few seconds. During this period, a large amount of energy is transferred to the food, which may trigger reactions that lead to undesirable changes or by-products formation. During nonthermal processing, food temperature is held below that achieved in thermal treatments. Thus, vitamins, essential nutrients, and flavors are expected to undergo minimal or no changes.

Pulsed light (PL) is used for the rapid inactivation of microorganisms on food surfaces, equipment, and food packaging materials. The terms high-intensity broad spectrum pulsed light and pulsed white light are synonymous with PL.

Inert-gas flash lamps generate intense and short pulses of ultraviolet (UV) light for microbial inactivation started during the late 1970s in Japan. In 1988, extensive experimentation carried out by PurePulse Technologies Inc. provided a pulsed light process called PureBright® to sterilize pharmaceuticals, medical devices, packaging, and water. The process's efficacy was tested against a broad range of microorganisms, including bacteria (vegetative cells and spores), fungi, viruses, and protozoa. However, the food industry adopted the technology only in 1996, when the Food and Drug Administration approved the use of PL technology for the production, processing, and handling of foods.

Description of PL

PL involves the use of intense pulses of short duration and a broad spectrum to ensure microbial inactivation on the surface of either foods or packaging materials. Electromagnetic energy is accumulated in a capacitor during fractions of a second and then released in the form of light within a short time (nanoseconds to milliseconds), resulting in an amplification of power a minimum of additional energy consumption (Dunn et al. 1995). Typically, the equipment used to produce PL comprises one or more adjustable xenon lamp units, a power unit, and a high-voltage connection that allows the transfer of a high current electrical pulse. As the current passes through the lamp unit's gas chamber, a short, intense burst of light is emitted. The light produced by the lamp includes broad-spectrum wavelengths from UV to near-infrared. The wavelength distribution ranges from 100 to 1,100 nm: UV (100–400 nm), visible light (400–700 nm), and infrared (700–1,100 nm). Pulses of light used for food processing applications typically emit 1 to 20 flashes per second at an energy density in the range of about 0.01 to 50 J cm−2 at the surface (Barbosa-Canovas et al. 1998).

Liquid Foods

Many fluids, such as water, have a high degree of transparency to a broad range of wavelengths, including visible and UV light. Other liquids, such as sugar solutions and wines, exhibit more limited transparency. Increasing the number of solids will diminish the intensity of UV radiation's penetration. In an aqueous solution, the lower the transparency, the less effective the PL treatment. Liquids with high UV absorbance must be treated as a thin layer to reduce the liquid's radiation absorption. In this manner, the liquid's UV absorption is low, and bacteria are more likely to be subjected to lethal doses. The absorbance of clarified fresh juices and juices containing pulp varies considerably. Clarified apple juice has a low absorbance, with absorption coefficients about 11 cm−1, whereas absorbance of orange juice can achieve values close to 50 cm−1. A positive correlation between vitamin C content and the absorption coefficient of clear apple juices was observed.

Conclusions

PL is a novel non-thermal technology to inactivate pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms on foods. The significant microbial reductions in short treatment times, the limited energy cost of PL, the lack of residual compounds, and its great flexibility are some of the technique's major benefits. This method is clearly efficient in inactivating microorganisms in vitro, but its potential for real foods is still under investigation. Further studies need to be conducted to assess PL treatments' effects on food properties beyond safety and spoilage. There is a need for optimizing the critical process factors to achieve the target inactivation level for specific food applications without affecting quality. PL equipment with good penetration and short treatment times need to be designed for commercial purposes. Also, the applicability of PL treatments on an industrial scale needs to be compared with other nonthermal or conventional thermal processes.

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The coco kind

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Honest Beauty

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Sephora

https://www.sephora.com/brand/edible-beauty

Sakara

https://www.sakara.com/products/beauty-chocolates

The real coconut

https://therealcoconut.com/

Deuterium and Red Light Therapy

As the most accessible element in the globe, hydrogen plays a huge role in our biological processes. However, you may not know that hydrogen usually brings an uninvited guest in your body, and we call it deuterium. Having high deuterium levels may change the chemical reactions in your cells and affect your bodily functions and metabolism, leading to unwanted health consequences.

What is Deuterium?

Deuterium is also known as a “heavy hydrogen” and is one of the two stable hydrogen isotopes. We commonly have it in our bodies — in fact, it helps children grow. However, adults may have too much deuterium because of dietary and environmental factors. As mentioned above, this may lead to chemical reactions at a cellular level and lead to health risks.

How Can Deuterium Affect Your Health Negatively?

Hydrogen is necessary for our day-to-day bodily functions. Our biological processes require it, and we usually get it from what we eat or drink. Upon intake, hydrogen goes to the mitochondria, also known as the powerhouse of the cells.

Our mitochondria can be compared to thousands of engines that continually run to produce the ATP energy we need to survive daily. The majority of people eat only three to five pounds of food each day, but we usually make more than 170 pounds of ATP energy at the same time.

On the other hand, deuterium is like hydrogen’s “evil” sibling. And we repeat, excess deuterium is harmful to our bodies. Because it is twice as heavy and large as hydrogen, it may damage the nanomotors in your mitochondria and slow down ATP energy production. As time goes by, the wear and tear on your nanomotors caused by the heavy hydrogen atoms may completely break your nanomotors. This damage may cause muscle pain, dehydration, impaired memory, poor sleep, headaches, and lymph nodes.

How Can You Measure the Level of Deuterium in Your Body?

Two “D-terminator” diagnostic tests can help measure the deuterium levels in your body. Advanced technology, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), can also be used to visualize and track deuterium patterns in your body, whether it’s in your bodily fluids, DNA, or even your hair and nails. Based on these tests, your doctor will be able to determine your deuterium levels. And when it shows to be excessive, he/she may come up with a plan to deplete deuterium in your body.

Why Do We Get Overloaded with Deuterium?

We experience high deuterium levels because of what we eat or drink and some other environmental factors. For instance, carbohydrates, processed foods, and synthetic supplements contain high levels of deuterium. Tap, ocean, and river water also have high deuterium levels, so when you’re exposed to these things regularly, you may experience an overload of this hydrogen isotope.

How Can You Deplete Deuterium?

Nutrition is the baseline of depleting deuterium. Based on your test results, your doctor may recommend consuming food groups that contain lower levels of deuterium, such as proteins, green vegetables, and healthy fats. You may also be advised to drink deuterium-depleted water to lower your deuterium levels.

Health experts say that a body that functions properly can naturally regulate deuterium levels and produce healthy amounts of ATP energy.

How Does Red Light Affect Deuterium?

Red and near-infrared light can affect our body’s hydrogen bonds in a process quite similar to photosynthesis. The water inside our cells usually becomes less harmful when our bodies absorb wavelengths of red and near-infrared light between 600–950 nanometers. This helps with proper cellular respiration and helps increase ATP energy production in your body.

Changing the water's resistance in your body, red, and near-infrared light can help reduce the amount of friction at the cellular level, promote cellular longevity, and lead to higher outputs of good energy.

To learn more about the benefits of red light therapy or to see what kind of red and near light therapy devices you can use to lower your deuterium levels, click here.


More References

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-61983-3

https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-61983-3

Wang, M.; Audi, G.; Kondev, F. G.; Huang, W. J.; Naimi, S.; Xu, X. (2017). "The AME2016 atomic mass evaluation (II). Tables, graphs, and references" (PDF). Chinese Physics C. 41 (3): 030003-1–030003-442. doi:10.1088/1674-1137/41/3/030003.

https://www.hindawi.com/journals/tswj/2018/5454367/

The Benefits of Red Light Therapy in Treating Hypothyroidism

Thyroid issues are a commonplace problem that affects all ages and genders. It significantly contributes to changes in mental outlook, energy levels, skin, and weight. Hypothyroidism has drawn much attention due to many cases that are left undiagnosed, untreated, or inadequately treated. As a result, it led to more serious problems such as infertility, heart disease, neurological problems, and high cholesterol and blood pressure levels. Not to mention, treatment studies for hypothyroidism have experienced a significant backlog throughout the years.

In this article, we take a look at the basic precepts of hypothyroidism and how Red light therapy plays a role in treating the thyroid problem.

What is Hypothyroidism?

Hypothyroidism is a chronic abnormality of the thyroid gland, demonstrating an inadequacy of thyroid hormones such as triiodothyronine and thyroxine (T4). Normal levels of thyroid hormones stimulate a healthy amount of mitochondrial energy production. This means that in hypothyroid cases, the thyroid inhibits a state of low cellular energy.

As a result, people who suffer from this chronic problem often feel unusual fatigue, tiredness, weight changes, and skin problems. However, symptoms can vary from person to person and may even be subtle enough to be left undiagnosed and untreated. When left untreated, the disease causes more irreversible neurological, reproductive, and cardiovascular problems. It’s also found that Hypothyroidism is found to be five to eight times more prevalent in women than in men.

What Causes Hypothyroidism?

Hypothyroidism can be caused by a wide range of diet and lifestyle issues. Some cases can be caused by a lack of iodine intake, especially in more underdeveloped parts of the world. It can also be caused by other dietary issues such as low carb intake, excess polyunsaturated fat intake, and alcoholism. Other typical causes include stress, aging, sleep deprivation, and heredity.

What is Light Therapy?

When talking about light, we often think of it as the first thing we switch on in a dark room or the bright rays that set up the mood. We don’t usually think of it as having bioactive properties, penetrating beneath our skin, affecting the way our hormones, tissues, and cells function.

In reality, our cells actually capture photons of light, just like how plants do. Light therapy, also called photobiomodulation, essentially means light (photo) changing (modulation) your biology (bio).

How Can Red Light Therapy Help Treat Hypothyroidism?

Red and near-infrared light therapy, backed by over 5,000 studies, has grown its significance in medicinal treatments throughout the years.

Red light therapy is significantly targeted for hypothyroidism because unlike other kinds of light; they have a greater penetrability beneath our skin.

In fact, a 2010 study found that 38% of patients with Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism who were given red light therapy treatments have reduced their medication dose, while 17% have been able to stop the medication completely.

Here’s how it works:

  1. It Supplies energy

Because hypothyroidism is reflective of low cellular energy in the thyroid, red and near-infrared light helps the cells work better by supplying more energy to your body.

They have a photoreceptor called cytochrome c oxidase that works by catching photos of light. Like how our food is being processed by our body for the mitochondria to stimulate energy, the photos of light also stimulate energy production in the mitochondria. The mitochondria are responsible for the energy production of our body’s cells.

  1. It Prevents Stress

Red light is also shown to prevent stress by averting nitrous oxide poisoning. This means that aside from helping the mitochondria supply more energy, red light helps the thyroid hormone by alleviating stress-related molecules' effects.

  1. It Breaks the Cycle

Hypothyroidism is a vicious cycle of having low energy availability and decreased thyroid hormone production. By stimulating energy production in the mitochondria and preventing nitrous oxide poisoning prevention, red light can potentially break the cycle responsible for hypothyroidism.

In Kaiyan Medical, we produce a medical-grade red light therapy device that is effective and non-invasive, ideal for supplementing hypothyroidism treatments. Our device has a dual optical energy technology that combines red light and infrared light therapy as an excellent spectrum for deeper penetration and absorption. You can now rise above hypothyroidism and maximize your body’s healing properties with our Red Light therapy device.

More References

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6247385/

https://drruscio.com/red-light-therapy-part-ii/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6822815/

https://www.health.harvard.edu/newsletter_article/treating-hypothyroidism


Let’s Talk About Optimal Performance Recovery and Red Light Therapy

Performance and recovery go hand in hand when training or doing physical activities, regardless if you’re an athlete or not. In fact, athletes and their trainers utilize light therapy to improve their performance and muscle health and optimize recovery. To expound further, this article will tackle optimizing performance in fitness, improving the recovery process, and breaking down the significance of light therapy.

Optimizing Performance and Improving Recovery

Optimizing performance means paying attention to the body and how it functions, to live and train the body, and to find the best way to support its functions. Performance is not based on how hard or heavy are the weights you lift or the number of kilometers you’ve run; it is how effective your performance is and how you match it with your lifestyle (with the way you eat, drink and sleep).

On the other hand, recovery is about the effectiveness of the body’s healing process and the conscious effort of being in your best shape by enhancing your workout. It is also about utilizing the body’s tools and functions to effectively finish the jobs required daily.

Physical Performance and Recovery

Performance and recovery are correlated to one another. In exercising or training, if you want to improve fitness, workouts should be consistent. To get stronger, faster, and bigger, certain efforts must be made to increase performance levels. The recovery process is essential in health. It contributes to the workout; it is the downtime between training sessions or a break due to an injury or a period of healing from any exhaustion experienced.

Breaks like cool-downs, rest, and ample time of sleep give your body time to recuperate. They also allow healing for the muscles and tissues affected, strained, or damaged from workouts or training.

Performance is better when recovery time from soreness or inflammation is maximized. It also helps prevent burnout, fatigue, and possible injuries. If recovery is not made right, your physical performance may not reach its optimal state. Some athletes and trainers even make a recovery a priority over training itself. They believe that when an athlete recovers better than their competition, they will train harder in the long run.

Recovery is for Everyone

Even if you are not an athlete, you should know how to let your body rest, heal, and recover properly from any form of injury or physical activity. Everyone has their own activity levels to maintain. It may not be sports-related, but everyone demands effort from their bodies on a day-to-day basis.

When Recovery is Not Prioritized…

Regardless if you are an athlete, your body has limits. And if you push too hard, the body can break down and perform worse, especially if you didn’t observe any recovery time. Overtraining and pushing the body beyond its limits can affect performance in the short term or long term. Chances of injury are higher when you don’t allow yourself to recover, and it may also affect hormonal levels and the function of the immune system. The body needs time to process inflammation or any injury.

Inflammation and the Importance of Recovery

Inflammation happens when the body responses to danger or strain. It often takes place during a strenuous workout. When exercising, inflammation may indicate muscular damage. And when a muscle is “damaged,” it means that the tissue is growing and undergoes repair to get stronger.

Experiencing inflammation is a normal part of the growth and repair of muscle tissues. However, if you won’t set aside time for recovery, your inflammation may worsen over time and lead to greater health consequences.

4 Easy Ways to Improve the Recovery Process

Here are some ways that can help you improve your body’s recovery process:

  1. Body awareness

The body speaks when it sends signals to the brain. Sometimes, we dismiss these signals because of training goals. This may eventually lead to fatigue and injury. When you experience pain or when your muscles are sore, it is important to give your body time to recuperate. You must also be aware of your heart rate, especially at rest, as it may be saying something about the state of your health.

  1. Getting enough sleep

Besides giving your body time to recuperate, deep sleep also allows the body to digest and process fat and recover from inflammation or damaged muscle tissues. It is harder for the body to recover from pain, strain, fatigue, and injury when you’re sleeping less than 7–8 hours per night. If you’re struggling with getting enough sleep, try doing meditation or speak with a doctor so he/she can advise you about developing a sleeping routine.

  1. Eating a balanced diet.

Getting the right amount of whole foods, good carbohydrates, protein, and good fat can also boost your performance and recovery. Lowering your intake of processed foods, alcohol, and sugary drinks can also help decrease inflammation.

  1. Aiming for balanced and healthy cells

The performance and recovery of our bodies depend entirely on our cells. When our cells are creating and using energy efficiently, our bodies recover faster. ATP (adenosine triphosphate) energy is released to give us power in what we do. The process of creating ATP energy works best when our body and cells are well-balanced, reaching a state called homeostasis.

Light Therapy, Performance, Healing, and Recovery

High-quality devices are now available in the market to help athletes and trainers enhance the body’s natural healing and recovery process through light therapy.

Light therapy is a non-invasive treatment that uses LED lights to deliver red and near-infrared light to the skin and cells. It promotes efficient cellular ATP energy production and helps restore the balance of cells and tissues. Light therapy can be done before or after a workout. Some even do it both times — before and after a workout, depending on their goals.

Pre-conditioning with light therapy before working out can also help strengthen muscle performance. It can limit muscle damage and strain, lessening the chances of inflammation or soreness. When used after a workout, it promotes the speedy recovery of muscles and accelerates its adaptability to exercise. It also helps the body process acute inflammation after physical activity.

The Relationship Between Light Therapy and Muscle Cells

Muscles are composed of millions of cells that need to release ATP energy to fulfill the body's jobs, balancing exercise and stress. Light therapy helps improve cellular ATP energy, glycogen synthesis, oxidative stress reduction, and protection against muscle damage from exercising. Light therapy also helps improve blood circulation and oxygen availability, which allows better healing and recovery. It helps with the overall improvement of physical performance and faster recovery times. It also helps limit fatigue from exercising and strength training.

Recover and Improve Your Performance with Light Therapy

As discussed, light therapy promotes faster healing and recovery and soothes cells under stress when doing strenuous workouts, incurring injuries, and experiencing inflammation. When you set aside time for recovery, you give your body and cells what they need to function, thus improving your overall performance.

At Kaiyan Medical, we offer high-quality light therapy devices to help you achieve and maintain your fitness and performance goals. If you have questions about our products and the brands we offer, please don’t hesitate to contact us. We will respond to you as soon as possible.

Sunlight & Light Therapy, Allies, or Foes?

For thousands of years, people have used sunlight as a means to aid health and even cure illness. But the concept has gone in and out of favor over the course of time.

Some of the logic related to sunlight began in China around 6,000 BC. At that time, Chinese architects began building homes to face south so that the sun would heat the interior, a practice that continues even today. While windows were likely no more than a gap in the wall at the time, you can still imagine families gathering around to soak up the light and heat. Finally, the trend of solar-heated homes began to catch on in Greece and even Rome. Learn more about solariums.

Then, in the 1900s, research by Augusta Rollier led to the establishment of solaria — buildings designed to optimize exposure to sunlight — throughout Switzerland for the express purpose of sunbathing, which provided impressive results for fighting tuberculosis, smallpox, lupus, and even chronic diseases like arthritis.

But by the middle of the 20th century, the American Cancer Society began demonizing sun exposure as a significant cause of skin cancer.

However, doctors, scientists, and clinical research is demonstrating that consistent exposure to sunlight is actually a critical component of overall health.

Almost all life on earth needs sunlight for many essential functions. It’s hard to ignore its importance for our emotional and physical health as well. We did not evolve in the darkness. The fact that our bodies use UV wavelengths to produce vitamin D has been well established. Read more about vitamin D here.

Is Sunlight Dangerous?

Several recent studies have come to the conclusion that consistent sunlight exposure actually reduces the chances of getting melanoma, and instead increases the survival rate. Also, throughout the ages, regardless of their geographical location, large groups of people have been exposed to nearly continuous sunlight. We evolved having sunlight.

So why did the melanoma epidemic not hit until the 1970s? And if sunscreen is the solution, why have melanoma rates increased over 200% since 1973 — even while the U.S. sunscreen industry has expanded from $18 million in 1972 to around $2 billion today? It’s hard to believe that sunlight was the major problem, nor sunscreen the solution.

A recent review of many such studies published in the European Journal of Cancer Prevention concluded that “there is accumulating evidence for sunlight as a protective factor for several types of cancer.”[5] Sadly, many people still live under the incorrect premise that sunlight is damaging and harmful.

The reality is that we have become so disconnected from natural sunlight that our bodies aren’t equipped to handle its under-appreciated benefits. You may be surprised to learn that as your body gets sunlight in the morning, you can actually prepare your cells for the effects of UV light later in the day. And amazingly, the wavelengths in evening sunlight have a natural repairing effect. That’s because red and infrared wavelengths, which are delivered in higher concentrations in the morning and evening, have the unique ability to boost mitochondrial function. This, in turn, enables our cells to both withstand the stresses — and harness the benefits — of UV light. In addition, exposure to sunlight as the seasons change allows our skin to develop a tan, which also forms a natural protection against the stronger UV wavelengths during the summer months.

So the evidence suggests that sunlight might not be the bad guy, after all, we just need to develop a better understanding of how sunlight affects our bodies, and how to harness its potential to improve our health.

The Benefits of Receiving Sunlight

Our retinas are connected directly to the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus gland, which acts as the master circadian pacemaker of the body. Because of this, light received through your eyes plays a critical role in hormonal functions including melatonin production, which regulates our sleep. Quite literally, your body knows to shut off this hormone through exposure to morning sunlight. This type of exposure early in the day also helps produce melatonin later in the evening, when light is absent. Even more amazing, the hypothalamus gland, which is controlled by light, is responsible for controlling body temperature, thirst, hunger, and emotional activity — in addition to regulating your hormones and circadian rhythm!

Dopamine is another chemical that is regulated by light and released in the brain. It functions as a neurotransmitter and is closely tied to the emotions of reward and pleasure. In fact, many addictive drugs increase dopamine neuronal activity. Not surprisingly, studies have demonstrated that light exposure is tied to increased dopamine production. So it’s clear that light received through our eyes plays a much more powerful role than most of us realize.

How You Can Benefit from More Light

Getting as much natural sunlight as possible is clearly important. For example, receiving morning sunlight correctly sets your circadian rhythm. However, nowadays, most of us find it challenging to spend hours in the sun — at the right time of day — on a regular basis. Our busy schedules just don’t allow for more time in the sun. In fact, it’s estimated that Americans spend more than 90% of their time indoors.

Because this is the case for most of us, a great way to receive the healthy wavelengths of light is by using a light therapy device. One way to think of red light therapy is as a supplement for your health. Dietary supplements help fill out the vitamins your body needs, and regular red light therapy sessions help fill in the lack of natural light our bodies need.

There are many proven benefits of receiving certain wavelengths of natural sunlight directly through our skin and bodily tissues. One aspect that has received little attention is related to the cellular processes affected by certain wavelengths of light.

Researchers in the field of light therapy, or photobiomodulation (PBM), have discovered some incredibly powerful functions derived from wavelengths of light in the optimal window. Improved mitochondrial function, which impacts virtually all cellular metabolic activity, has been widely demonstrated to improve health in a number of ways — including enhanced muscle recovery, reduced inflammation, increased testosterone, and better overall skin health.

In addition to these clinically-proven benefits, several studies have demonstrated that certain wavelengths of light can increase blood flow and assist in the formation of new capillaries. Dr. Gerald Pollack explores this concept in more detail in his award-winning book, The Fourth Phase of Water.

In conclusion, scientists are really just beginning to understand the crucial role that light plays in our overall health. But recent evidence strongly suggests that exposing our bodies to the right kind of light can lead to some wonderful benefits.

Scientific Sources and Medical References:

Woloshyn, T. (2011). Our Friend, the Sun: Images of Light Therapeutics. [eBook] Osler Library of the History of Medicine. Available at: https://www.mcgill.ca/library/files/library/osler-ourfriendsun.pdf.

Melanoma Stats, Facts, and Figures [Web Log Post]. Available at https://www.aimatmelanoma.org/about-melanoma/melanoma-stats-facts-and-figures.

Sunscreen Report. [eBook] Available at: https://finalstepmarketing.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/Sunscreen-Market-Analysis.pdf.

Berwick, M., et al. Sun Exposure and Mortality From Melanoma. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2005 Feb 2;97(3):195–9.

van der Rhee H, Coebergh JW, de Vries E. Sunlight, vitamin D and the prevention of cancer: a systematic review of epidemiological studies. Eur J Cancer Prev. 2009 Nov;18(6):458–75.

Avci, P, et. al. Low-level (light) therapy (LLLT) in skin: stimulating, healing, restoring. Semin Cutan Med Surg. 2013 Mar;32(1):41–52.

Cawley, EI, et al. Dopamine and light: dissecting effects on mood and motivational states in women with subsyndromal seasonal affective disorder. J Psychiatry Neurosci. 2013 Nov;38(6):388–97.

Ihsan FR. Low-level laser therapy accelerates collateral circulation and enhances microcirculation. Photomed Laser Surg. 2005 Jun;23(3):289–94.

Klepeis NE, Nelson WC, Ott WR, et al. The National Human Activity Pattern Survey (NHAPS): a resource for assessing exposure to environmental pollutants. J Expo Anal Environ Epidemiol. 2001 May-Jun;11(3):231–52.

The Golden Healer - The Beginning of the Light Therapy

Light therapy, also known as phototherapy, has been widely used as a safe, noninvasive treatment option for several conditions, including skin disorders, insomnia, and depression. Today, light therapy is an FDA-approved cosmetic procedure and a skincare must-have, as it provides anti-inflammatory effects, promotes healing and helps increase collagen production, giving its users the fresh, glowing skin they’ve always wanted.

The History of Light Therapy

Some of the logic related to solariums began in China around 6,000 BC. At that time, Chinese architects began building homes to face south so that the sun would heat the interior, a practice that continues even today. While windows were likely no more than a gap in the wall at the time, you can still imagine families gathering around to soak up the light and heat. Finally, the trend of solar-heated homes began to catch on in Greece and even Rome.

If you’d like to geek out on this amazing health and beauty solution, let’s take a trip down memory lane and know how light therapy started, from the Chinese and Greeks to modern day discoveries.

The Greeks

Light therapy dates back to the ancient Greeks. The Greek city of the sun called Heliopolis was known for his healing temples that use sunlight spectrums (different colors) to cure specific medical concerns. This is also where the term heliotherapy, or the exposure to light, came from.

According to Socrates, the ideal house should be cool in summer and warm in winter and nowadays we still believe that. But, 2,500 years ago, in Greece, accomplish this was hard. No heating systems or any type of AC.

At that time, they ravaged the forest for wood to heat their homes and cook. Trees were also needed to fuel operations and build homes and ships. But, this was destroying the timberlands. Plato once compared the hills of Attica to the bones of a wasted body. Plato said:

“ All the richer and softer parts have fallen away…..and the mere skeleton of the land remains.”

With wood scarring and the supply sources getting farther and farther away, the fuel prices most likely went up. Fortunately, an alternative source of energy was available, the sun, whose energy is vast and free.

With time, the Greeks learned to build their houses to take advantage of the sun’s ray during winter and to avoid the sun’s heat during the hot summer. Individual homes were oriented towards the south and then entire cities were planned to allow citizens access to the winter sun. Citizens were saving money and resources.

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Greeks venerated the sun so they were happy to create their solar-friendly houses. Theophrastus, a naturalist commented that Greeks believed that —

the sun provides life-sustaining heat in animals and plants. It also probably supplies the heat of earthly flames. They believed they were catching the sun when making fire.

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It was commonly known that exposure to the sun nurtured good health. Oribasius, an ancient medical authority, wrote that south-facing areas were healthy places because of their exposure to the sun.

1903

Dr. Niels Finsen, a Danish physician and scientist, received a Nobel Prize of Medicine in 1903 for his contributions in treating lupus vulgaris and other diseases using concentrated light radiation. His award was well-deserved as he has opened new doors and treatment possibilities for the medical industry. Finsen first talked about the preliminary results of the use of ‘the chemical rays of light’ in 1896. When he said ‘chemical light,’ he meant ionizing light or light that produces chemical effects, such as ultraviolet rays.

1960s

Decades of research have shown that light therapy produces impressive therapeutic benefits to living tissue. In fact, in the 1960s, it was distinguished in Europe that treatment tissues gained therapeutic effects from single wavelengths through photo-stimulation. One good example of this is the practice of providing light treatment to babies who are suffering from jaundice or yellow skin.

1980s - 1990s

Light therapy became more popular from the 1980s to 1990s, as more clinics, medical facilities, and companies start to discover how powerful light therapy can be in terms of treating conditions and diseases. In fact the cosmetic benefits of light therapy also came to surface during this time. Meanwhile, some sports teams, athletes and physical therapists discovered that light therapy can help relieve sports-related injuries. It was noted that an injured person who undergoes light therapy can recover 50 times faster than a person who doesn’t.

2000s

The development of light therapy has become unstoppable starting 2000. More companies started to produce various light therapy machines and devices for medical treatment and aesthetic purposes. These equipment come in different lights and sizes to help address or give solution to different types of conditions. Some researches even found out that light therapy, using red frequency, combined with topical cream, can kill certain kinds of cancer cells.

Final Thoughts

We hope this quick throwback on the roots of light therapy has given you more insights about the effectivity of this solution both for clinical and aesthetic use. If you’re in need of light therapy machines and/or supplies, we can do the job for you. Here at Kaiyan Medical, we see to it that the medical devices we manufacture for our clients are safe and are compliant to ISO medical standards. You can trust that your machines will be manufactured using the right tools, at a safe environment. To learn more about our light therapy products and services, click here.

References