Hyperbaric Chambers - Oxygen Therapy

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy involves breathing pure oxygen in a pressurized environment. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is a well-established treatment for decompression sickness, potential risk of scuba diving. Other conditions treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy include serious infections, bubbles of air in your blood vessels, and wounds that may not heal due to diabetes or radiation injury.

In a hyperbaric oxygen therapy chamber, the air pressure is increased two to three times higher than normal air pressure. Under these conditions, your lungs can gather much more oxygen than would be possible breathing pure oxygen at normal air pressure.

When your blood carries this extra oxygen throughout your body, this helps fight bacteria and stimulate the release of substances called growth factors and stem cells, which promote healing.

Your body’s tissues need an adequate supply of oxygen to function. When tissue is injured, it requires even more oxygen to survive. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy increases the amount of oxygen your blood can carry. With repeated scheduled treatments, the temporary extra high oxygen levels encourage normal tissue oxygen levels, even after the therapy is completed.

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is used to treat several medical conditions. And medical institutions use it in different ways. Your doctor may suggest hyperbaric oxygen therapy if you have one of the following conditions:

  • Severe anemia
  • Brain abscess
  • Bubbles of air in your blood vessels (arterial gas embolism)
  • Burns
  • Carbon monoxide poisoning
  • Crushing injury
  • Deafness, sudden
  • Decompression sickness
  • Gangrene
  • Infection of skin or bone that causes tissue death
  • Non-healing wounds, such as a diabetic foot ulcer
  • Radiation injury
  • Skin graft or skin flap at risk of tissue death
  • Traumatic brain injury
  • Vision loss, sudden and painless
Risks

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is generally a safe procedure. Complications are rare. But this treatment does carry some risk.

Potential risks include:

  • Middle ear injuries, including leaking fluid and eardrum rupture, due to changes in air pressure
  • Temporary nearsightedness (myopia) caused by temporary eye lens changes
  • Lung collapse caused by air pressure changes (barotrauma)
  • Seizures as a result of too much oxygen (oxygen toxicity) in your central nervous system
  • Lowered blood sugar in people who have diabetes treated with insulin
  • In certain circumstances, fire — due to the oxygen-rich environment of the treatment chamber.
How to Prepare

You’ll be provided with a hospital-approved gown or scrubs to wear in place of regular clothing during the procedure.

For your safety, items such as lighters or battery-powered devices that generate heat are not allowed into the hyperbaric chamber. You may also need to remove hair and skin care products that are petroleum-based, as they are a potential fire hazard. Your health care team will provide instruction on preparing you to undergo hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

During Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is typically performed as an outpatient procedure but can also be provided while hospitalized.

In general, there are two types of hyperbaric oxygen chambers:

  • A unit designed for 1 person. In an individual (monoplace) unit, you lie down on a table that slides into a clear plastic chamber.
  • A room designed to accommodate several people. In a multi-person hyperbaric oxygen room — which usually looks like a large hospital room — you may sit or lie down. You may receive oxygen through a mask over your face or a lightweight, clear hood placed over your head.

Whether you’re in an individual or multi-person environment for hyperbaric oxygen therapy, the benefits are the same.

During therapy, the room's air pressure is about two to three times the normal air pressure. The increased air pressure will create a temporary feeling of fullness in your ears — similar to what you might feel in an airplane or at a high elevation. You can relieve that feeling by yawning or swallowing.

For most conditions, hyperbaric oxygen therapy lasts approximately two hours. Members of your health care team will monitor you and the therapy unit throughout your treatment.

After Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

Your therapy team assesses you, including looking in your ears and taking your blood pressure and pulse. If you have diabetes, your blood glucose is checked. Once the team decides you are ready, you can get dressed and leave.

You may feel somewhat tired or hungry following your treatment. This doesn’t limit normal activities.

Conclusions

To benefit from hyperbaric oxygen therapy, you’ll likely need more than one session. The number of sessions is dependent upon your medical condition. Some conditions, such as carbon monoxide poisoning, might be treated in three visits. Others, such as non-healing wounds, may require 40 treatments or more.

To effectively treat approved medical conditions, hyperbaric oxygen therapy is usually part of a comprehensive treatment plan provided with other therapies and drugs designed to fit your individual needs.

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College Students use Light Therapy to Improve Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)

The life of a college student is taxing, to say the least. It's likely the first time you're doing something on your own, and are responsible for yourself, your schedule and lifestyle. For some, this is the most liberating time; for others, it’s incredibly overwhelming. However, there's a general agreement that college students all go through difficult times. 

Whether still living with parents or sharing a dorm or space with roommates, college students are immersed in an entirely new life experience. Classes are challenging and students struggle with getting their work done while maintaining a social life, and perhaps a job. The level of pressure to succeed is very demanding, and this can cause negatively associated thoughts, leading to stress. Eating habits change and alter, usually for the worst, not to mention that the new sense of freedom can be chaotic for many young adults. 

Taking care of yourself is the number one priority, and when learning to deal with the new load of responsibility, college students often get sidetracked. Health and self-care get only an ounce of attention and not nearly as much as it should. While many students think it takes a lot of effort, just starting small shows results. 

Stress is the precursor of everything in our body, and leads to all sorts of illness and disorders. It's pretty common for college students to experience stress; more than 40% of students claimed to have experienced above-average stress levels, with it getting worse during exam periods and the winter season, when even more time is spent indoors. All of this, compounded by a pandemic and social distancing, makes for extremely challenging circumstances for college students today.

Now, colleges such as the University of Iowa are turning to light therapy to help get students the light they need to continue thriving. 

Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a mood disorder that occurs annually, generally in fall and early winter, and ends in sunnier and warmer months of spring and early summer. However, it’s worth noting that it’s not a perfect formula; there have been reported cases of the opposite, where a person starts experiencing the disorder spring or summer, and it only ends with the arrival of fall/winter. 

SAD can affect 11 million people in the U.S. each year, and 25 million more may have a milder form of the same disorder, also known as winter blues. Depression and anxiety affect 40 million adults in America, while only 36.9% receive the proper care for these mental health conditions

And, SAD’s symptoms can look and feel much like depression. It causes you to sleep more and gives you symptoms that look like other disorders such as chronic fatigue syndrome, under-active thyroid, low blood sugar, viral illnesses, or other mood disorders.

Seasonal affective disorder is linked to a lack of sunlight. The winter days are shorter, and that itself our circadian rhythm, or internal body clock. Everyone has a specific sensitivity to sunlight, and our bodies take a cue from the morning sunlight each day. In the winter time, the lack of sunlight creates perfect circumstances to experience SAD.

Light therapy, by definition, gives you a healthy supply of what you lack in winter months, often leading to SAD. But light therapy is much more than that. Light therapy’s uses and benefits are many, so while treating SAD, you could also be treating other problems you may not even know of – it’s like killing multiple birds with one stone, and that stone happens to be safe, non-invasive, and non-pharmaceutical.

Light therapy mimics the positive effects produced by exposure to the sun. It reproduces the effects the sun provides us with, and can solve numerous symptoms of SAD through the use of ultraviolet rays. You may be wondering if red light therapy is safe for skin: yes, it is entirely safe. Specifically, with Kayian's light therapy devices, which are FDA-approved and MDA-certified.

With light therapy, you're able to stimulate your cells into rejuvenation. The light works directly at the cellular level and triggers the reproduction of ATP, the fuel our system needs to function properly. 

Light therapy helps with SAD by causing our brain to believe it's getting more sunlight. Even though the light is fabricated, it's still light. We still reap all of the benefits as we do from sun exposure. Melatonin and serotonin are what affects the impact; they too, are triggered by our light therapy devices, which is what battles SAD. 

The scientific evidence on light therapy and SAD says that even within the first hour, you may experience positive results. With daily use of light therapy, thousands of people have overcome the debilitating symptoms of SAD and other disorders, and now even college students can turn to the holistic treatment to replenish the light they’re lacking.

Back to Nature: The Healing Power of Bird Sounds

What is Sound Therapy?

Sound has been used to heal and calm people for thousands of years. Himalayan singing bowls used in Asia during prayer and meditation positively affect one’s health and well-being. This is just one example of age-old instruments from all over the world being applied as healing instruments.

Sound therapy is based on the premise that we are all made up of energy frequencies, and audio frequencies can interact with our body’s energy to rebalance our systems.

Since music is basically just organized sound, it can be deconstructed to affect our physical and psychological well-being positively.

Ailments Sound Therapy can Help:
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder
  • Autism and learning disabilities
  • Dementia
  • Behavior and psychiatric disorders
Five Other Benefits of Sound Therapy
  • Lower stress responses
  • A decrease in mood swings
  • Pain management
  • Improves sleep
  • Lowers blood pressure

How Does Bird Music Help in Sound Therapy?

Our body’s response to noise traces back to when humans began roaming the earth. Think about loud noises  such as your alarm clock in the morning, the rattling of a jackhammer, or the din of the open office. These sounds evoke an instinctive fight-or-flight reaction in our brains, causing a release of chemicals that stimulates immediate action. This reaction has been instrumental to our survival for eons and remains so to this day. The loud honk of a car horn immediately stimulates our brain and body to respond quickly and get us out of harm’s way.

The things we see, hear, and experience moment after moment not only change our mood but impact us on a deeper physical level; it alters the way our nervous, endocrine, and immune systems function.

Listening to birdsong is a wonderful way to reconnect with nature and shift your focus away from the clutter and chaos that is often part of our daily lives.

According to Eleanor Ratcliffe from the University of Surrey, in her thesis examining the restorative perceptions and outcomes associated with listening to birds, bird sounds have the ability to transport yours to nature.

So, not only does bird music affect us positively on a fundamental level of sound frequency, but it also has the capability to make you think you’re in a natural environment, which will in and of itself reduce stress, anxiety, and depression.

Why Is Bird Music So Powerful For Relaxation And Reducing Anxiety?

In today’s fast-paced world, it is vital to make lifestyle choices that will reduce stress and ultimately prolong your life. It has been revealed that listening to slow tempo, low-pitched music with no lyrics can reduce stress and anxiety in people who are to undergo invasive surgery. It also lessens the requirement of subsequent pain medication.

Now, the above are some proven benefits of listening to ordinary music. Just think how powerful it will be to add bird sounds to the mix?

Bird songs and calls are the sorts of natural sounds that most people associate with perceived stress recovery.

During semi-structured interviews conducted with twenty adult participants, Eleanor Ratcliffe determined the following reasons why bird song helps with relaxation and reducing anxiety.

1. Invokes Positive Memories

Bird sounds associated with enjoyable or special events help combat stress and anxiety and ease depressive episodes, as it creates positive emotions linked with particular places and times.

2. Shifts the Focus

Listening to bird music during trying times moves the focus away from the problems and leads to calm.

3. Change of Stimuli

We get used to the everyday sounds of city life. When we listen to bird music, it provides a break from the emotions associated with our surroundings. This short reprieve will help reduce stress.

4. Welcome Distraction

Bird music has the ability to effortlessly take you out of your current environment without you having to move a muscle.

As a symbol of nature, a bird song transports you far from the daily hustle and bustle and removes you from day-to-day demands that may be causing anxiety.

Although science hasn’t yet caught up with bird music believers’ confidence in its healing properties, the evidence speaks for itself since most support is anecdotal.

Bird music is by no means a miracle cure and should still be used in conjunction with medicine as prescribed by your general practitioner.

How Does Bird Music Work Scientifically?

Bird music can clearly have positive effects on a person’s mood, mental health, and physical well-being.

But what real scientific proof is there of music in general’s impact on mental states?

Below you will find some studies that back up what people have been saying for years — music has healing properties.

1. Changes Brain Function

Using electroencephalographs (EEGs) — a device that measures electrical impulses in the brain — established that music with a strong beat stimulates the brain. In contrast, slow beats encourage the brain to relax by promoting a meditative state. When you listen to faster beats, it can lead to deep concentration.

According to a psychologist who was one of the participating researchers, the human brain is usually locked into a specific functioning level. But by speeding up or slowing down the brainwaves, it is easier for the brain to change its speed in reaction to external and internal stimuli.

2. It Increases Blood Flow in the Brain

Thomas Budzynski, an affiliate professor of psychology at the University of Washington, found that the mind enjoys new stimuli. Whenever the brain experiences new sights or sounds, blood flow increases, equalling a better cognitive response. Some anecdotal evidence indicates that this increase in blood flow may help in repairing damaged brain cells.

3. Stimulates the Release of Internal Opioid Peptides

In a review titled The Neurochemistry of music, it is mentioned that listening to music lowers the need for pain medication due to the euphoria often experienced when listening to specific music.

4. Increases Dopamine Levels

Dopamine is responsible for body movements but also plays a role in a person’s emotional response. For this reason, should music raise dopamine, it will be an excellent thing, especially if you’re suffering from mood swings, depression, anxiety, and other mental illnesses or associated symptoms.

Using neuroimaging technology, the central dopamine release while listening to enjoyable music was measured, and the results are positive. The right type of music does increase dopamine.

No wonder listening to music is one of life’s most pleasurable and relaxing activities.

Kaiyan Medical

We are pioneers and architects of light therapy products. Slowly, we are implementing sounds into our devices. We no longer design for our skin and muscles but also our ears.

Work from Home, Light Therapy Style

This past year has shaken us up, leaving many of us in new routines that we’re still adjusting to. Unless you’re an essential worker, many of us are now working from home to reduce contact with others. Though working from home was a dream for many, it’s safe to say we didn’t imagine things working from home looking like this.  

The quick transition from in-office to working from home has left many unprepared. Aside from working under stressful conditions, most people simply brought home their laptop, thinking this would be a short-term situation. But things didn’t go as planned.

A year has passed, and those same people are still working from their kitchen table. The problem? Working from home can do more harm than good when it comes to our mental and physical health. And with that, there’s an increased risk of burning out, injuring yourself from a lack of proper office equipment, and the blurred lines between one’s personal and work life. 

So how do you divide work life from home life if your home has become your workplace? 

When all these issues compile on top of each other, it’s a recipe for disaster. More people who work from home are experiencing neck and joint pain, increased screen time, poor sleep, eye strain, and heightened stress and fatigue levels. 

Naturally, most doctors will say the remedies for these symptoms is to reduce stress by working out, meditating, going into nature, taking more breaks, massaging sore muscles, or working with proper equipment. But with lockdowns and quarantines implemented, those solutions aren’t necessarily available. 

However, red light therapy is an all-in-one treatment therapy that can promote quality sleep, reduced stress, and alleviate neck and joint pain. 

But how does red light therapy work? 

Let’s take a look at how light therapy treats neck and shoulder pain.

Most treatments for neck and shoulder pain consist of physical therapy, massage, or pain relief medication. But red light therapy has proven to be a non-invasive option for significantly reducing neck and shoulder pain. 

Red light therapy works by reducing inflammation, which is usually both the cause and symptom of neck and shoulder pain. Red and infrared light penetrates through the skin, reaching the cells that produce energy (adenosine triphosphate) in the mitochondria. By increasing the function of the mitochondria, cells make more adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and begin the process of rejuvenating and repairing themselves.

When inflammation occurs in the body, red light therapy repairs those damaged cells in the muscles, tendons, and ligaments, reducing the pain felt in the neck and shoulders.

However, as we stated earlier, red light therapy isn’t only for neck and joint pain. When it comes to inflammation, it occurs everywhere in the body, including the eyes. 

When working from home, we are typically spending three more hours per day in front of our electronic devices. This has a serious impact on eyesight and overall well being. Research has shown that red light therapy treatments can help heal the eyes from injury, reduce inflammation, and protect against vision loss. 

As we spend more time in front of our devices, we experience more fatigue and reduced quality of sleep. Red light therapy helps trigger our natural circadian rhythm and promotes improved sleep, thus reducing fatigue. 

Working from home hasn’t been the dream we’ve all hoped for. In fact, it’s negatively impacted our mental and physical health. However, there’s a solution to your symptoms and it’s red light therapy. 

Kaiyan Medical manufactures MDA-certified and FDA-approved laser light therapy devices, ideal for people who are experiencing symptoms from working from home, including eye strain, fatigue, stress, and neck and shoulder pain. 




Light Therapy & C-sections

The experience of transformation from womanhood into motherhood is a privilege reserved exclusively for women. Pregnancy and childbirth are wonderful and remarkable moments of life. Giving birth to a child can be one of the most joyful experiences too. Naturally, expectant mothers spend a lot of time thinking about how they will give birth. Although most people believe that vaginal birth is the best way to deliver, sometimes a Caesarean section cannot be avoided. As well, labor pain is one of the most intense pains experienced by women, which leads to an increase in the number of women opting to undergo a cesarean delivery. Pharmacological and nonpharmacological analgesia methods are used to control labor pain. Epidural analgesia is the most commonly used pharmacological analgesia method. However, it may have side effects on the fetus and the mother. Light-emitting diode (LED) photobiomodulation is an effective and noninvasive alternative to pharmacological methods.

Caesarean section was introduced in clinical practice as a lifesaving procedure both for the mother and the baby. It is a surgical procedure in which the incision is made on the products of conception. Caesarean birth is often used as a prophylactic measure to alleviate the problems of birth, such as cephalo pelvic disproportion, failure to progress in labor or fetal distress. A major concern in maternal and child health nursing is the increasing number of caesarean birth being performed annually. In India, primary caesarean birth is about 30.2% of births. The majority of the states are within the WHO specified range of Caesarean section (5 to 15%). Among that, five states are above the range and 12 states below the specified range. Reports also say that the prevalence of Caesarean section is generally more in the southern states. After the baby is born via C-section, the result is a wound that must heal, and pain is common during this healing process.

Wound healing acceleration and pain management in women who underwent the cesarean surgery could help them to return to their normal functioning, especially to begin breastfeeding their newborns as one of the most important aspects of newborn care. Failure incomplete healing of the wound is one of the probable complications of caesarean section. Post caesarean wound infection due to delayed wound healing and pain are not only a leading cause of prolonged hospital stay but a major cause of the widespread aversion to caesarean delivery in developing countries. Management of those problems is essential to decrease infection, length of the hospital stay, pain, and help to return for normal function.

Mothers who undergo caesarean section should achieve immediate recovery than other surgical patients because of maternal and neonatal wellbeing. Several studies have investigated many approaches and protocols of wound healing and pain management in women undergoing caesarean section. Though different approaches have been introduced, these approaches are still inadequate and unsatisfactory in many patients. Thus it seems that postoperative management in this group of people is more challenging than other surgical patients. Infrared Rays have a therapeutic effect of increasing the blood supply and relieving the pain. This will increase the supply of oxygen and nutrient available to the tissues, accelerate the removal of the waste products, and bring about the resolution of inflammation. When the heat is mild, pain relief is probably due to the sedative effect on the superficial sensory nerve endings. It also helps to achieve muscular relaxation. Infrared rays also have a physiological effect on cutaneous vasodilation due to the liberation of chemical vasodilators, histamine, and similar substance, and a possible direct effects on the blood vessels. Stronger heating of infrared stimulates the superficial nerve endings. It has been noticed that pain is due to the accumulation of waste products, and because of stronger heating, the blood flow increases and removes that waste product, and the pain is relieved. In some cases, the relief of pain is probably associated with muscle relaxation. The muscle relaxes most readily when the tissue is warm. The relief of pain itself facilitates muscle relaxation. So the infrared radiation is considered a choice of Electro Therapy Modality for wound healing and pain among mothers who underwent caesarean.

References

Hopkins K (2000) Are Brazilian women really choosing to deliver by cesarean? Soc Sci Med 51:725–740

https://doi.org/10.1590%2F1806-9282.64.11.1045

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=16192541

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=10594500

Light & Water: The Fourth Phase

Water has three phases — gas, liquid, and solid; but inside Dr.Pollack’s lab, findings imply the presence of a surprisingly extensive fourth phase that occurs at interfaces. The formal name for this fourth phase is exclusion-zone water, aka EZ water. This finding may have profound implications for chemistry, physics, and biology.

The impact of surfaces on the contiguous aqueous phase is generally thought to extend no more than a few water-molecule layers. However, Dr.Pollack found that colloidal and molecular solutes are profoundly excluded from hydrophilic surfaces' vicinity to distances up to several hundred micrometers. Such large exclusion zones have been observed next to many different hydrophilic surfaces, and many diverse solutes are excluded. Hence, the exclusion phenomenon appears to be quite general.​​

Multiple methods have been applied to test whether the exclusion zone's physical properties differ from those of bulk water. NMR, infrared, and birefringence imaging, as well as measurements of electrical potential, viscosity, and UV-VIS and infrared-absorption spectra, collectively reveal that the solute-free zone is a physically distinct, ordered phase of water. It is much like a liquid crystal. It can co-exist essentially indefinitely with the contiguous solute-containing phase. Indeed, this unexpectedly extensive zone may be a candidate for the long-postulated “fourth phase” of water considered by earlier scientists.​

The energy responsible for building this charged, low entropy zone comes from light. We found that incident radiant energy, including UV, visible, and near-infrared wavelengths, induce exclusion-zone growth in a spectrally sensitive manner. IR is particularly effective. Five-minute radiation exposure at 3.1 µm (corresponding to OH stretch) causes an exclusion-zone-width increase of up to three times. Apparently, incident photons cause some change in bulk water that predisposes constituent molecules to reorganize and build the charged, ordered exclusion zone. How this occurs is under study.​

Photons from ordinary sunlight, then, may have an unexpectedly powerful effect that goes beyond mere heating. It may be that solar energy builds to order and separates charge between the near-surface exclusion zone and the bulk water beyond — the separation effectively creating a battery. This light-induced charge separation resembles the first step of photosynthesis. Indeed, this light-induced action would seem relevant not only for photosynthetic processes but also for all realms of nature involving water and interfaces.​

In conclusion, you can think of water as a battery. It’s excellent to absorb and store energy, and it’s good to transfer that energy from water molecule to water molecule (picture the ripples that happen when you drop a rock in a pond). The water molecules end up moving closer together to stabilize themselves; they become denser and more viscous and store energy in the form of a negative charge. This is EZ water. It’s like a charged battery — it’s carrying that valuable vibrational energy and is ready to deliver it. Using light therapy infrared devices from Kaiyan Medical, you can make your EZ water. The other alternative is to sunbathe naked under the sun, but that can lead you to sunburns, so we suggest our devices.

How Light Therapy Enhances Physical Therapy Treatment

Though laser technology started with Albert Einstein, the technology didn’t evolve until the 1960’s when a laser prototype at Hughes Research Laboratories in Malibu, California, was first built. However, its purpose wasn’t for the medical industry; instead, for the military.

It eventually trickled down into Hollywood when Sci-Fi directors realized its potential for visual effects. But, of course, it didn’t take long for other fields to jump on the laser light bandwagon, including the medicine and rehabilitation industries. From there, the medical industry began to understand laser light’s impact on the human body when it came to healing and recovery.

Low-level (light) laser therapy (LLLT) is used to treat various conditions, including pain relief and inflammation. Over the past ten years, research and technological advancements have fine-tuned low-level light therapy, making the treatment highly effective in providing pain relief and healing treatment.

What is Low-Level Laser Light Therapy?

Before we talk about its capabilities, it’s essential to understand how it functions. Low-level laser light therapy is a non-invasive technique that gives the body a low dose of light to stimulate cellular healing. Laser light therapy targets the specific area in need to increase mobility by reducing pain and inflammation.

Low-level laser light therapy works through a process called photobiomodulation. During this process, the light is absorbed by the body’s tissue, where the cells respond with a physiological reaction, promoting cellular regeneration. The light stimulates cellular metabolism to promote cell growth and the healing of damaged cells.

How Laser Light Affects the Body

There are a couple of ways laser light therapy affects the body. Here’s what laser light therapy does for the body:

  1. Light energy is absorbed by melanin, hemoglobin, and water. The energy dissolves into heat, creating a soothing and warm sensation. The warming sensation helps patients feel relaxed.
  2. There’s an increase in ATP production in the mitochondria through light energy, the cell’s powerhouse. With increased ATP production, more energy is available for the healing process.
  3. Light energy aids with the release of nitric oxide, which enhances the circulation of damaged tissue. Increased circulation allows for improved oxygen exchange, nutrient exchange, and waste removal.
  4. Light energy releases crucial chemicals that help reduce inflammation.

So can laser light therapy be used alongside physical therapy? The answer is yes. In fact, the two treatments complement each other perfectly.

The Perfect Pair: Laser Light Therapy and Physical Therapy

With patients experiencing chronic or acute pain, the feeling of pain isn’t the main issue. However, patients can reduce pain and inflammation symptoms through laser light therapy while undergoing physical therapy treatments. Laser light therapy is ideal for pre and post-surgical procedures and during rehabilitation.

Patients undergoing laser light therapy will feel warm and soothing healing sensations as well as an immediate reduction in pain after treatment. By reducing pain, patients will improve their physical therapy performance and reduce their healing time. Ideally, four to six laser light therapy sessions are recommended to patients to receive the best results.

Whether you’re looking to improve your chiropractic, dermatology, medical or physical therapy practice, laser light therapy can provide your patients with the extra care they need to reduce chronic or acute pain and inflammation symptoms.

With many laser light products on the market, you want to make sure you’re investing in a medical-grade laser light device for your practice. Kaiyan Medical manufactures MDA-certified and FDA-approved laser light therapy devices, ideal for various medical and rehabilitation industries.

50% Greater Growth in Muscles with Red Light Therapy

One study randomly divided participants into two separate groups for an 8-week training program. One group received a red light treatment before every training session, while the other group did the same training without the light treatment. They found that the group receiving the light therapy improved muscle growth 50% greater than those with muscle training alone. Pretty amazing, right?

Another randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study using red and infrared light on the biceps demonstrated peak and average performance of more than 12% more than the control group. But while this is all very interesting, I’m sure you’re wondering whether Red Light Therapy is worth it and what it can do for YOU. First of all, I’m sure many of you appreciate the science breakdown, but some of you may not be able to follow, so here’s a simple explanation.

Scientists have discovered that our cells show an incredible response to light, but not just any light. Only in the 660–850 nanometer (nm) range which is the so-called red light range. This type of light energy penetrates deep into the skin, muscle, and joint tissue and stimulates ATP production, which you should think of as your body’s way of transporting energy to where it needs to go. More ATP means more efficient energy transfers in layman's terms, which translates to various benefits at a cellular level.

So, by exposing our body to the therapeutic red light, our cells receive this rejuvenating, anti-aging energy boost that enables them to perform every single function at a heightened level and now that you understand the science behind it, let’s a look at the 5 reasons why it might be a good idea for you to invest in this technology.

Increased Energy & Testosterone

Sometimes we feel lethargic and out of energy, like our body is constantly running on empty. Then you spend some time outside on a nice hot summer day, and you all of a sudden feel amazing? It’s because our bodies rely on light as a source of energy, helping our glands to regulate adrenaline, testosterone, metabolism, and several other functions, and it has been shown that Red Light Therapy can increase testosterone production, which in turn can increase overall energy levels and even improve peak muscle performance.

Reduced Muscle Recovery Time

After a challenging workout, your body works around the clock to repair and strengthen torn muscle fibers. We know this. We also know that nutrition plays a huge role in providing the body with the resources it needs for this process. But what most of you don’t know is that specific wavelengths of light play a role in this process. By enhancing mitochondrial function, red light has been proven to produce measurable gains in peak strength and reduced recovery times.

Faster Healing For Joint & Muscle Injuries

Injuries, repetitive motion, or aging, in general, can lead to severe joint pain and tissue damage. But the body’s natural healing response can be greatly accelerated by red and infrared light. Also, relief from pain, faster recovery times, and reduced arthritis symptoms are just a few more of Red Light Therapy's benefits. For bodybuilders, yes, Red Light is also great for reducing Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness or DOMS. After all, it’s a type of muscle tissue injury as well.

Healthier & Younger-Looking Skin

Red Light Therapy can improve skin clarity, tone, and texture, reduce fine lines, wrinkles, and puffy eyes, help fade scars, acne, and stretch marks, even enhance wound healing and circulation, simply by increasing the production of collagen and elastin.

Remember, collagen is a long-chain amino acid and the most abundant protein in the body. It’s responsible for giving skin its elasticity, hair its strength, and connective tissue its ability to hold everything in place. In fact, the collagen protein makes up 30% of the total protein in the body and 70% of the protein in the skin!

Now while collagen is beneficial to the entire body, it’s most noticeably beneficial to the skin. This is because as we age, the epidermic (or outer layer of skin) thins and loses elasticity in a process known as elastosis. As this happens, we tend to show more aging signs and acquire more wrinkles and stretch marks. But by restoring normal cellular function, because red light stimulates collagen production, red light therapy can help keep your skin looking healthier and younger for LONGER.

Stress Relief

You can’t argue that our minds and body are under constant stress because of our busy lives. Well, Red Light Therapy has been proven to calm our physical and mental state by reducing oxidative stress. Now, I cannot personally attest to that, simply because my stress is through the roof, and other times, I get my mind right and relax, but it makes sense. Oxidative stress is not just harmful to our physical health but also our mental state as well.


Effectiveness of a Light Emitting Diode System on Tooth Bleaching

The first commercial marketing of a 10% carbamide peroxide whitener occurred in 1989. Nowadays, various treatment modalities are available, which include over-the-counter bleaching (self-administered), in-office bleaching (professionally administered), and dentist-supervised take-home bleaching (professionally dispensed). Modern society desires to see the effect of bleaching immediately, resulting in higher concentrations of chemicals used in the whiteners' composition with different light sources believed to accelerate the bleaching process. These high concentrations should only be applied by qualified people to control and prevent possible damage to oral soft tissue. Today in-office bleaching mainly uses carbamide peroxide (CP) or hydrogen peroxide (HP), which might be activated by heat or light (with a chemical catalyst) to catalyze the tooth bleaching process. It is believed that most light sources decompose peroxide faster (by increasing the temperature) to form free radicals, which whiten teeth. Various light sources are available, for example, light-emitting diodes (LED’s), lasers, halogen lamps, and plasma arc lamps (PAC). All available in Kaiyan.

A laboratory study using six different photoactivation systems on three different 35% hydrogen peroxide whiteners found that only the diode laser, halogen lamp, and LED lamp showed significant color changes. Here, the light source is more important than the bleaching agent in the whitening process. Kossatz (2011) reported a larger difference in bleaching with a light-emitting diode than without it (on 35% HP gel), with a shade guide value change of 4.8 vs. 3.8 units. However, tooth sensitivity was higher (53% subjects) for the LED treated group but only 26% for the non-activated group after 24 hours of treatment. Tooth sensitivity was also found to be persistent and higher when the LED activation was used.

In a recent (2011) critical appraisal of power bleaching it was stated that light sources used in tooth whitening do not generate sufficient heat to damage teeth. They concluded that high concentrations of chemicals are responsible for faster whitening and that light sources are therefore superfluous in the whitening process.

Today LED lights are available across the visible, ultraviolet and infrared spectrum of wavelengths. In Kaiyan Medical we can provide you with all the right devices and wavelengths. The LED light system investigated for this article is marked as a blue LED light which means the wavelength should be between 450 and 500 nm. It is also reported that LEDs can emit light of an intended color without using any color filters as in traditional lighting methods. This Kaiyan tooth whitening system is claimed to have an activating gel which prevents heat formation, has no sensitivity to teeth, prevents pulp damage, has a blue LED light with a tailored wavelength to activate their custom made gel and can whiten teeth with up to 11 shade tabs within 20 minutes.

prodcut-image


The EA-05 model is one of our best selling teeth, whitening lights. All of the parts are made from aluminum and stainless steel.
The LED head unit reduces heat for maximum comfort during treatment.

The EA-05 comes with an aluminum wheelbase that can be easily assembled and disassembled in minutes — and comes in an aluminum wheeled carry case.

1. German Osram LEDs for performance and reliability

2. LED life expectancy > 50.000 hours

3. Ideal for beauty salons, mobile practitioners, and clinics

4. Can be easily assembled/disassembled for mobility

References

1. Khin PW, Barnes DM, Romberg E, Peterson K. A clinical evaluation of 10% vs. 15% carbamide peroxide tooth-whitening agents. J Am Dent Assoc. 2000;131:1478–84. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

2. Sulieman M, Addy M, MacDonald E, Rees JS. The effect of hydrogen peroxide concentration on the outcome of tooth whitening: an in vitro study. J Dent. 2004;32:295–9. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

3. Buchalla W, Attin T. External bleaching therapy with activation by heat, light or laser: a systematic review. Dent Mat. 2007;23:586–96. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

4. Zhang C, Wang X, Kinoshita, et al. Effects of KTP laser irradiation, diode laser and LED on tooth bleaching: a comparative study. Photomed Laser Surg. 2007;25:91–5. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

5. Joiner A. Tooth colour: a review of the literature. J Dent. 2004;32:3–12. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

6. Lima DA, Aguiar FH, Liporoni PC, Munin E, Ambrosano GM, Lovadino JR. In vitro evaluation of the effectiveness of bleaching agents activated by different light sources. J Prosthodont. 2009;18:249–54. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]


Laser and Light-based Treatment of Keloids

Keloids are an overgrowth of fibrotic tissue outside the original boundaries of an injury and occur secondary to defective wound healing. Keloid scars commonly grow beyond the wound boundaries, while hypertrophic scars are confined to the wound’s original area. Both types of scars arise as a result of impaired fibroblastic proliferation and collagen deposition after skin injury. Keloids often have a functional, aesthetic, or psychosocial impact on patients, as highlighted by quality-of-life studies. They can greatly affect the patient’s quality of life and emotional wellbeing by causing intense pain, itching, unappealing red appearance, and inexorable spread. Interestingly, keloids and hypertrophic scars are exclusively found in humans and do not occur in animals naturally. The lack of suitable animal models that recapitulate the key processes in keloidal/hypertrophic scarring has greatly hampered our understanding and treatment of these scars.

Treatments for keloids include surgical excision, intralesional or topical corticosteroids, other intralesional therapies: 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), bleomycin, and interferon, topical imiquimod, compression, cryotherapy, radiation, silicone sheeting, and laser or light-based therapies. Recurrence is common, even with combination therapy. Laser and other light-based technology have introduced new ways to manage keloids that may improve aesthetic and symptomatic outcomes and decrease keloid recurrence. Laser and light-based therapies for keloids can be grouped into three categories: ablative lasers, non-ablative lasers, and non-coherent light sources.

Non-ablative lasers target hemoglobin or melanin. 585 or 595-nm pulsed-dye lasers (PDL) are non-ablative, and the major chromophore is oxyhemoglobin. PDL also targets melanin; therefore, care must be taken to avoid pigmentary alterations. PDL is hypothesized to treat keloids by selective damage of blood vessels that supply the scar. The 980-nm diode laser targets hemoglobin and melanin. The 1064-nm neodymium-doped: yttrium, aluminum, and garnet laser and the 532-nm neodymium-doped: vanadate laser is hypothesized to primarily treat keloids by damaging deep dermal blood vessels.

Non-laser light sources are also used to treat keloids. These techniques include intense pulsed light therapy (IPL), light-emitting diode (LED) phototherapy, also known as low-level light therapy, and photodynamic therapy (PDT). These modalities utilize light energy that may cause keloid fibroblast functional modification. IPL emits non-coherent, broadband wavelength, pulsed light, and targets pigmentation and vasculature. LED phototherapy is hypothesized to photomodulate mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase altering intracellular signaling. PDT requires the application of a photosensitizer, commonly 5-aminolevulinic acid or methyl aminolevulinic acid, that is preferentially absorbed by highly vascularized or metabolically active tissue and converted to protoporphyrin IX. Upon exposure to light, PpIX causes reactive oxygen species free radicals that have a cytotoxic effect. PDT may also cause alterations in extracellular matrix synthesis and degradation and modulate cytokine and growth factor expression.

The mechanisms by which topical PDT improves abnormal scars are largely unknown. However, they probably involve downstream responses to the ROS produced by the photodynamic reactions: the ROS induces membrane and mitochondrial damage, which activates signaling molecules such as TNF-α and interleukins 1 6 and cell death. The cell death may be via apoptosis, necrosis, and/or autophagy. These changes may alter growth factor and cytokine expression in the lesion, thereby modulating collagen production and extracellular matrix organization.

Notably, the shallowness of PDT suggests that it may be useful as an adjunct treatment of the wound area after keloid resection. In this setting, PDT may help to prevent postoperative keloid recurrence.

Pro Athletes Harnessing the Power of Red Light

Originally from https://www.lunaspanel.com/post/pro-athletes-harnessing-the-power-of-red-light


Being a professional athlete is no joke, and when your body is a central part of your job, it needs to be very well taken care of. And even when athletes are doing all the right things to take care of their body, injuries are still widespread in professional sports; but it used to be that their career was over if an athlete was injured. But now, athletes can undergo surgery and pop back up on the court or field months later. How is that possible?

As most athletes know, a large portion of time is dedicated to repairing muscles and alleviating inflammation for the next game. Regardless of the sport, teams spend millions of dollars on professional physical therapists to guarantee their athletes receive the highest physical treatment standard.

The recovery process for an athlete is essential and a determining factor of how well they’ll perform during their careers. You’ll often hear the words “optimizing performance” when discussing the recovery process for athletes. Today, the recovery process isn’t just to heal an athlete but to naturally enhance their performance.

So, how do professional therapists optimize professional athletes’ performance and recovery? Well, red light therapy is turning out to be one of the most effective treatments for these high-performing individuals.

Professional trainers are always looking for natural ways to enhance their player’s performance. With light has proven to be a lead modality, many trainers and athletes use light therapy to enhance the body’s natural healing process. But how does it work?

When used, natural red light penetrates the skin and cells. When the light reaches the mitochondria, it stimulates the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). ATP is a natural energy currency in the human body. With an enhanced ATP production, cells in the muscle are optimized and repaired faster.

Hundreds of peer-reviewed clinical trials have backed up the results athletes see on the courts and fields. In 2015, researchers conducted a meta-analysis of placebo-controlled trials, and the results were astounding. They found that most clinical trials showed “significant improvement for the main measures related to performance,” including endurance and speed. And through this meta-analysis, it was concluded that “phototherapy (with lasers and LEDs) improves muscular performance and accelerates recovery when applied before exercise.”

However, red light therapy does more than recover muscle tissue. It also increases muscle strength, ultimately improving physical performance.

A 2016 study researched red light therapy on elite athletes and trained and untrained athletes. What was found was that red light therapy after training could increase muscle mass. So, not only does red light therapy accelerate the recovery process, but it also improves muscle strength.

But what about endurance? Being strong is only one aspect of being an athlete. Endurance is crucial when competing against an opponent. A triple-blind, placebo-controlled trial published in 2018 studied the effects of red light therapy on men and women undergoing endurance training on treadmills. It was found that red light therapy pre-exercise can “increase the time-to-exhaustion and oxygen uptake and also decrease the body fat in healthy volunteers when compared to placebo.”

Another study from 2018 completed by Brazilian researchers found that after their randomized, triple-blind, placebo-controlled trial on pro soccer players, those who underwent red light therapy stayed longer on the playing field. It was concluded that light therapy “…had a significant improvement in all the biochemical markers evaluated…pre-exercise [light] therapy can enhance performance and accelerate recovery…”.

Peer-reviewed clinical trials worldwide have all concluded the same thing: red light therapy works for increasing athletic performance levels. Luna’s red light therapy device can help professional athletes and the rest of us exercise regularly, recover from injuries, and improve our physical and muscular health.

Light Therapy & Diabetes

DAccording to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 100 million adults in the United States suffer from diabetes or pre-diabetes. A chronic disease characterized by elevated blood glucose levels (blood sugar), diabetes develops because the body doesn’t make enough insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas. Low insulin levels cause glucose to build up in the blood, resulting in various health problems, some severe.

There are three types of diabetes: type 1, type 2, and gestational. Whichever type you may have, light therapy could be the treatment solution you’ve been looking for. This article will explore red light and near-infrared (NIR) light for diabetes: a novel solution that helps treat this disease's complications at the cellular level — healing from the inside out.

Red and Near-Infrared Light for Diabetes

While some people with type 2 diabetes (also called adult-onset diabetes) can achieve target blood sugar levels with lifestyle changes, diabetes medications, or insulin therapy may also be needed to control blood sugar. Many medications cause serious side effects. Diabetes has no cure, and symptom management is the only way to coax the disease into remission.

Red and NIR light has been used successfully to treat the complications associated with diabetes. Before we delve into that, let’s do a quick overview of what this treatment method actually is.

Red light therapy, also called low-level light therapy (LLLT) or photobiomodulation, is an umbrella term referring to the red light and NIR light. It uses powerful light-emitting diode (LED) bulbs to deliver intense beams of red and NIR wavelengths to bare skin.

Wavelengths of light are measured in nanometers (nm). Research has shown that red wavelengths from 630nm to 660nm, and NIR wavelengths from 810nm to 850nm, have the greatest scope of benefits — and come with no side effects.

Although studies often focus on either red or near-infrared wavelengths, experts say the best treatment approach is to use both. Doing so will provide skin-deep as well as deep-tissue benefits. For example, the 630nm to 660nm wavelengths address the skin's health, and the longer 810nm to 850nm NIR wavelengths penetrate deeper into the body. NIR wavelengths can even penetrate bone and hard connective tissue like cartilage.

Increase Capillary Formation for Improved Blood Flow

Thomas Burke, Ph.D., a retired physiologist with the University of Colorado Medical School, has studied blood flow — specifically changes in blood flow — for more than 30 years. Dr. Burke’s extensive research into the effects of red light therapy on circulation has led him to conclude that infrared light increases blood flow in any site in the body to which it is applied. This has profound implications for treating slow-healing wounds such as diabetic foot ulcers, which affect approximately 15 percent of patients with diabetes.

One effect of diabetes is meager amounts of nitric oxide produced by the body, which hinders normal blood flow. This is one reason people with diabetes often develop a circulatory condition called peripheral arterial disease, in which narrowed blood vessels reduce blood flow to the limbs. Many diabetes patients also develop diabetic neuropathy, a peripheral nervous system disorder that causes loss of feeling in the extremities, especially the feet.

The combination of poor blood flow and neuropathy can make people with diabetes more susceptible to ulcers or infections in the feet that, if allowed to spread, may require extreme measures such as amputation. LLLT can help circulation by stimulating the formation of tiny capillaries in areas treated by the light. This allows for better oxygen and nutrient delivery to the body’s peripheral regions, including the feet, which seem to bear the brunt of diabetic complications.

Increased Cellular Metabolism and Energy

The decreased blood flow that’s characteristic of diabetes interferes with the proper functioning of mitochondria, the “energy factories” inside most body cells. When mitochondria function normally, their primary job is to produce adenosine triphosphate (ATP), an energy-rich molecule that serves as fuel for cells. ATP is essential for normal cellular functioning, including repair and replication.

Poor cellular energy, officially known as mitochondrial dysfunction, is one of the main causes of diabetic neuropathy, so restoring normal mitochondrial function is essential. When there’s a chronic blood sugar imbalance, cells become stressed, unable to function properly, and unable to repair themselves.

Low-level light therapy addresses mitochondrial dysfunction by increasing ATP production. This, in turn, energizes cells and sparks a chain reaction of beneficial biological processes and improved health. When mitochondrial function is returned to normal, it supports skin ulcers and neuropathic pain and helps restore normal peripheral nervous system functioning.

Restored Normal Nerve Functioning

Until LLLT was developed, loss of sensation in the feet of diabetics was considered progressive and irreversible. Even today, the recommended treatment is often anti-inflammatory drugs that interrupt pain pathways. These drugs do not address the underlying problem: abnormal nerve signaling due to inflammation and mitochondrial dysfunction.

Today, diabetic neuropathy can be treated using near-infrared light. According to a 2015 study by medical researchers from Iran, NIR light therapy effectively reduces neuropathic pain and promotes damaged nerve cells' regeneration.

An earlier study by researchers from Japan also focused on LLLT’s effects on nerve regeneration. It is known that disrupted blood sugar levels can lead to oxidative stress, which can cause inflammation. The study revealed that NIR light acts as an antioxidant and reduces inflammation, conducive to nerve regeneration.

Increased Collagen Production

Diabetes can cause uncomfortable, often painful changes in the skin, including severe dryness, peeling, cracking, and abnormal callus growth. Red light therapy boosts the body’s natural collagen production so that as skin cells are renewed, the damaged skin can be gradually replaced by healthy skin. Improved blood flow and cellular functioning also support healthy skin growth.

Reduced Inflammation for Faster Wound Healing

Diabetic foot ulcers may form due to a combination of poor circulation, immune system deficiency that makes it hard for the body to fight off infection, diminished foot sensitivity (diabetic neuropathy), and ill-fitting shoes. Infected and dead tissue will need to be removed. The growth of healthy new tissue needs to be supported with blood sugar management and optimal mitochondrial functioning, and collagen production.

A Stronger Immune System

Improving health requires a robust immune system, and LLLT can help in several significant ways. For instance, it stimulates the production of stem cells, which are the body’s master cells with the potential to develop into many different types of cells. Stem cells remain in a dormant, non-specialized state until they are needed, when they are mobilized into action and carried to various parts of the body where they take on specialized roles.

Also essential for a healthy immune system is the thyroid, which LLLT helps to balance. People with diabetes have an increased risk of developing hypothyroidism, which is an underactive thyroid. Hypothyroidism results in mitochondrial dysfunction and poor cell functioning.

Also, research has shown that LLLT supports liver regeneration for more efficient waste disposal. This helps treat systemic inflammation and supports the workings of the immune system.

Consistency

LLLT is not an instant cure for any condition. You may experience relief after just one session, but the greatest results will come with time as the body’s cells regenerate and optimize their functioning. This can take a few weeks to a few months. Several sessions per week can help manage and minimize diabetic complications and keep the disease in remission on an ongoing basis.

Laser Acupuncture Treatment?

Acupuncture under traditional Chinese medicine is an alternative medicine that treats patients by needle insertion and manipulation at acupoints (APS) in the body. Acupuncture causes collagen fiber contraction, resulting in soluble actin polymerization and actin stress fiber formation, affecting the nervous and immune systems. Besides, acupuncture leads to molecular changes at APs in tissues at the cellular level. The local physicochemical reactions at the APs send signals to the organs via the tissue fluid and blood circulatory systems for optimal adjustment of the body’s organs.

It is believed to have been practiced for more than 2500 years, and this modality is among the oldest healing practices in the world. Acupuncture is based on the idea that living beings have Qi, defined as inner energy, and that it is an imbalance in Qi or interruption in the flow of Qi that causes illness and disease. Acupuncture therapy is focused on rebalancing the flow of Qi, and the practice is progressively gaining credibility as a primary or adjuvant therapy by Western medical providers.

Laser Acupuncture

Kaiyan Medical has been working to create ergonomic laser pens to simulate the acupuncture process. Laser acupuncture (LA) — non-thermal, low-intensity laser irradiation to stimulate acupuncture points — has become more common among acupuncture practitioners in recent years. LA is a safer, pain-free alternative to traditional acupuncture, with minimal adverse effects and greater versatility. LA has many features that make it an attractive option as a treatment modality, including minimal sensation, short duration of treatment, and minimal risks of infection, trauma, and bleeding complications.

What is the Difference

In acupuncture, needles are inserted at specific acupoints, which may be manually stimulated in various ways, including gentle twisting or up-and-down movements. Besides, the depth of needle penetration is also manipulated by the acupuncture practitioner. The patient may report sensations of De Qi, which are feelings of pressure, warmth, or tingling in the superficial layers of the skin. Many theories to explain how acupuncture works have been proposed, including the gate-control theory of pain and the endorphin-and-neurotransmitter. Others have postulated that acupuncture modulates the transmission of pain signals and alters the release of endogenous endorphins and neurotransmitters, resulting in physiologic changes.

One clear difference between needle acupuncture and LA is that LA does not physically penetrate the skin. Despite a greater understanding of LA, it is unclear how non-thermal, low-intensity laser irradiation stimulates acupoints. The mechanism of LA may be entirely separate from our present understanding of acupuncture. Current theories postulate that LLLT could positively affect modulating inflammation, pain, and tissue repair, given appropriate irradiation parameters.

Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Lasers

Inflammation reduction comparable to that of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has been reported with animal studies that used red and near-infrared LLLT, with laser outputs ranging from 2.5 to 100 mW and delivered energy doses ranging from 0.6 to 9.6 Joules. Human studies have shown similar anti-inflammatory effects with LLLT, which may account for many associated positive clinical results.

Cellular Effects of LLLT

LLLT improves cell physiology by increasing the overall cell redox potential toward greater oxidation and increased reactive oxygen species while simultaneously decreasing reactive nitrogen species. These redox state changes activate numerous intracellular-signaling pathways, including nucleic acid synthesis, protein synthesis, enzyme activation, and cell cycle progression.17 LLLT also alters the expression of genes that can enhance cell growth and inhibit cell apoptosis.16 These cellular effects of LLLT might reflect its ability to induce long-term changes in cells and LLLT’s benefits for wound healing, nerve regeneration, and inflammation reduction.

LLLT Characteristics

Red and infrared laser wavelengths are absorbed by cytochrome C oxidase protein in the mitochondrial cell membranes. This absorption is associated with increased adenosine triphosphate production by the mitochondria, which. In turn, it increases intracellular calcium (Ca2+) and cyclic adenosine monophosphate, which serve as secondary messengers that aid in regulating multiple body processes, including signal transfer in nerves and gene expression.

The power density of a laser, defined as laser energy supplied per area (W/cm2), influences its energy penetration depth. A 50-mW laser with a beam size of 1 cm2 has an energy density of 0.05 W/cm2. In contrast, the same power laser with a beam size of 1 mm2 has an energy density of 5 W/cm2 — a higher energy density results in deeper energy penetration through the skin.

Energy transmission through the skin is also affected by the absorption of light energy by skin structures. Light wavelengths from 650 to 900 nm have the best penetration through the skin. Lower wavelengths are absorbed by melanin and hemoglobin, and wavelengths longer than 900 nm are absorbed by water. With a well-focused laser beam, red wavelengths (~ 648 nm) can penetrate 2–4 cm beneath the skin surface, and infrared wavelengths (~ 810 nm) can penetrate up to 6 cm.

Now Kaiyan has made LLLT easier to use. Kaiyan medical devices can treat multiple acupoints simultaneously at the same time.


Could Red Light Therapy be the Cure for Low Libido?

We’re animals of habit. When it comes to intimacy, it’s a night-time activity. Published findings on The Daily Mail discovered that most people have sex between 9:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. But what most people don’t realize is that for improved sex, you need the light.

Low libido (sex drive) has been a physical issue for both men and women. In the United States, sexual dysfunction affects 43% of women and 31% of men alone. However, further studies have shown this is a global issue. A study with 5,255 male participants from Croatia, Norway, and Portugal found that 14.4% reported a lack of sexual desire lasting two months or longer.

It’s clear low libido isn’t an issue within one gender; it’s a health concern that both men and women grapple with. For women, one survey at Hackensack University Medical Center, New Jersey, found that 36% of women between 18-to-3-years-old and 65% of women between 46-to-54-years-old reported low sexual desire.

But why are we losing our libido?

A loss of libido is a common issue linked to both the physical and the psychological self. Physical issues linked to low libido include low testosterone, alcohol and drug use, medication, and too little or too much exercise. At the same time, psychological issues can include stress, mental health, depression, and relationship issues.

Where do many of these problems stem from? Well, it certainly doesn’t help that we’re living our lives in overdrive: we’re working more; we’re chronically stressed, and generally living in ways that aren’t natural to our species.

However, where we live also plays a crucial role. Andrea Fagiolini, M.D., said, “In the Northern hemisphere, the body’s testosterone production naturally declines from November through April, and then rises steadily through the spring and summer with a peak in October. You see the effect of this in reproductive rates, with June showing the highest rate of conception.”

Since our body’s testosterone production naturally declines during winter and spring, many people are looking for treatment. As a result, many opt for hormone replacement therapy. It’s a controversial treatment that comes with a heavy dose of side effects, including prostate or breast cancer, sleep apnea, liver toxicity, and cardiovascular events.

Are people supposed to adjust to living with a low libido if they don’t want to undergo a dangerous treatment? Of course not. Luckily, red light therapy has been proven through various clinical studies to improve low libido levels.

At the University of Siena, Italy, scientists tested sexual and psychological responses to bright light. They discovered that regular, early-morning use of light therapy increases testosterone levels and sexual satisfaction.

So how does red light therapy increase testosterone in the body, exactly?

When your body is exposed to bright light, it produces a chemical called luteinizing hormone (LH). The more LH produced in the body leads to a higher testosterone increase, said the lead researcher Andrea Fagionlini, M.D.

Other studies in animals suggested that red light therapy influences Leydig cells — the body’s sperm producers located in the testicles.

“We found fairly significant differences between those who received the active light treatment and the controls,” Fagiolini stated. Dr. Brad Anawalt, an endocrinologist and professor of medicine at the University of Washington in Seattle provides two possible explanations for red light therapy’s effect on testosterone.

Since testosterone levels are the highest in the morning, a lack of daylight can reduce morning levels. Dr. Anawalt said, “[So] exposure to bright light might raise testosterone concentrations, leading to improved libido.” He added that “many men, and women, with low libido, suffer from depression. The bright light that mimics sunshine may help alleviate depression. Improved mood results in improved sex drive.”

Red light therapy can increase testosterone levels and reduce some of the causes of low libidos, such as depression, anxiety, and overall fatigue.

Lunas red light therapy panels have many benefits — even on our sex and love lives — which is an integral component to our well-being.

Understanding the Basics of Design Thinking

In his book The Sciences of the Artificial, Herbert Simon started what we now refer to as design thinking. Since then, numerous other works have been published detailing design thinking concepts and how it relates to all manner of different business models. One of the most famous icons to design thinking in the modern era is probably Apple, Inc. Let’s ask ourselves:

· Did you feel you needed an iPod before Apple created?

· Did you feel you needed an iPhone before Apple created it?

Apple’s genius during the early 2000s was not in creating new products that no one had ever heard of. There were dozens of cell phone manufacturers making quality cell phones before the iPhone landed. There were dozens of MP3 players on the market before the original iPod.

But, once Apple entered the arena, none of that mattered. Why? Because Apple understood the unarticulated needs (and in fact, you could even argue that Apple’s real genius was creating a need for a product by releasing that product!) of its customers. How were they able to do this?

How can we solve a problem for our customer in such a way that they don’t even know the problem exists until we show the solution?
The Five Phases of Design Thinking

Design thinking is a process of five distinct phases of execution. Those phases are:

· Empathize

· Define

· Ideate

· Prototype

· Test

Looking at that list, it seems to be a mix of skills from various disciplines. “Prototype” and “test” seem to be drawn from engineering and product development, whereas “empathize” and “ideate” come from a more psychological, social methodology.

Phase 1 — Empathize

Empathizing immediately sets design thinking apart from most of the other business models out there. True, most business models strive to understand their ideal client’s needs and wants, but few do it from a relational perspective. This is what Simon Sinek talks about in his book Start With Why: That people don’t buy what you do, they buy why you do it. For Apple, that meant understanding the desire of their customers to be a part of something. They weren’t buying things because it was the best. They were buying it because of the reasons behind WHY Apple made it. When the corporate world was turning its back on customer relations and focused more on profits than on value, Apple communicated a different mission and mindset, which allowed their sales to skyrocket.

Phase 2 — Define (The Problem)

Another crucial part of design thinking. The problem. The majority of creators will fail at this part because they think about problems as nouns. Problems are verbs. If you see a little girl trying to get cookies from the shelf, people will start listing the problems as:

· She needs a cookie

· She needs an adult

· She needs a ladder

· Maybe she needs milk with those cookies

While the truth is, she needs to reach. Reaching is the problem, not the cookies. If you solve the reaching problem, you solve anything she will want to reach in the future. Once we understand others' unarticulated needs through authentically empathizing, it’s time to define the problem.

Phase 3 — Ideate

Ideation, the process of coming up with potential solutions to your customers’ unarticulated needs, can only occur after those needs have been identified through empathy and the problem defined. Do we solve the problem through a product, or a relationship, or a service? Is it through expanding our business model to include other forms of retail or consumer service? As an operations manager, the unarticulated needs that I wasn’t meeting for my fellow workers were found in the way I was focused on problems, not on them personally. I felt like, and if nothing was going wrong, there was nothing for me to do. What was going on underneath the surface, and what I was failing to do, was to spend time with them, to learn their processes to the point that I could spot potential problems before they actually became problems. Again, this human-centered approach must consider, above all else, the user's experience, whether customer, employee, or client.

Phase 4 — Prototype

Prototyping doesn’t necessarily have to involve models or scaled-down products. Prototyping also applies to non-physical solutions as well, in terms of how we construct frameworks to solve problems. Obviously, there are times when physical prototyping is important, but the overarching goal of prototyping is to apply solutions in a controlled environment to allow for testing, the fifth phase.

Phase 5 — Test

The final and simplest phase of design thinking. Since design thinking doesn’t flow like time in a strictly linear fashion between stages, there are times when prototyping leads back to ideation and when defining the problem actually requires more time spent empathizing to reassess the customer’s needs. Because of this frequently recursive nature, by the time we arrive at the design thinking process's final phase, sometimes testing merely confirms the last step in our solution. Other times, it can restart the entire process from the beginning. The importance of moving fluidly throughout all five phases.

Conclusion

Creativity is about doing, not thinking. Design thinking as well is about playing and acting. Those actions will swing between a process-oriented approach and a human-oriented approach depending on the project. At the end of it all, whether we are talking about coworkers or customers, the one thing they all have in common is that they are people looking for solutions to their problems. Solving the problem without addressing the people will only lead to frustration and failure. Providing a solutions-based approach to problems rather than a problems-based approach to problems will guarantee a greater chance of lasting implementation and effectiveness of whatever problem we’re solving.

Sources:

· https://www.ideou.com/pages/design-thinking

· https://www.creativityatwork.com/design-thinking-strategy-for-innovation/

· https://dschool.stanford.edu/resources-collections/a-virtual-crash-course-in-design-thinking

· https://www.interaction-design.org/literature/article/5-stages-in-the-design-thinking-process

· https://hbr.org/2008/06/design-thinking

Light & Food Preservation

Consumers demand high-quality processed foods with minimal changes in nutritional and sensory properties. Nonthermal methods are considered to keep food quality attributes better than traditional thermal processing. Pulsed light (PL) is an emerging non-thermal technology for decontamination of food surfaces and food packages, consisting of short time high-peak pulses of broad-spectrum white light. It is considered an alternative to continuous ultraviolet light treatments for solid and liquid foods. This paper provides a general review of the principles, mechanisms of microbial inactivation, and PL treatments applications on foods. Critical process parameters that are needed to be optimized for better efficiency of PL treatments are also discussed. PL has considerable potential to be implemented in the food industry. However, technological problems need to be solved to avoid food overheating and achieve better penetration and treatment homogeneity. Besides, more extensive research is needed to understand how PL affects quality food attributes.

Nonthermal technologies

Nonthermal technologies are being applied in food processing as a viable alternative to thermal processing. Traditionally, most foods are thermally processed by subjecting them to temperatures between 60 °C for a few minutes and 100 °C for a few seconds. During this period, a large amount of energy is transferred to the food, which may trigger reactions that lead to undesirable changes or by-products formation. During nonthermal processing, food temperature is held below that achieved in thermal treatments. Thus, vitamins, essential nutrients, and flavors are expected to undergo minimal or no changes.

Pulsed light (PL) is used for the rapid inactivation of microorganisms on food surfaces, equipment, and food packaging materials. The terms high-intensity broad spectrum pulsed light and pulsed white light are synonymous with PL.

Inert-gas flash lamps generate intense and short pulses of ultraviolet (UV) light for microbial inactivation started during the late 1970s in Japan. In 1988, extensive experimentation carried out by PurePulse Technologies Inc. provided a pulsed light process called PureBright® to sterilize pharmaceuticals, medical devices, packaging, and water. The process's efficacy was tested against a broad range of microorganisms, including bacteria (vegetative cells and spores), fungi, viruses, and protozoa. However, the food industry adopted the technology only in 1996, when the Food and Drug Administration approved the use of PL technology for the production, processing, and handling of foods.

Description of PL

PL involves the use of intense pulses of short duration and a broad spectrum to ensure microbial inactivation on the surface of either foods or packaging materials. Electromagnetic energy is accumulated in a capacitor during fractions of a second and then released in the form of light within a short time (nanoseconds to milliseconds), resulting in an amplification of power a minimum of additional energy consumption (Dunn et al. 1995). Typically, the equipment used to produce PL comprises one or more adjustable xenon lamp units, a power unit, and a high-voltage connection that allows the transfer of a high current electrical pulse. As the current passes through the lamp unit's gas chamber, a short, intense burst of light is emitted. The light produced by the lamp includes broad-spectrum wavelengths from UV to near-infrared. The wavelength distribution ranges from 100 to 1,100 nm: UV (100–400 nm), visible light (400–700 nm), and infrared (700–1,100 nm). Pulses of light used for food processing applications typically emit 1 to 20 flashes per second at an energy density in the range of about 0.01 to 50 J cm−2 at the surface (Barbosa-Canovas et al. 1998).

Liquid Foods

Many fluids, such as water, have a high degree of transparency to a broad range of wavelengths, including visible and UV light. Other liquids, such as sugar solutions and wines, exhibit more limited transparency. Increasing the number of solids will diminish the intensity of UV radiation's penetration. In an aqueous solution, the lower the transparency, the less effective the PL treatment. Liquids with high UV absorbance must be treated as a thin layer to reduce the liquid's radiation absorption. In this manner, the liquid's UV absorption is low, and bacteria are more likely to be subjected to lethal doses. The absorbance of clarified fresh juices and juices containing pulp varies considerably. Clarified apple juice has a low absorbance, with absorption coefficients about 11 cm−1, whereas absorbance of orange juice can achieve values close to 50 cm−1. A positive correlation between vitamin C content and the absorption coefficient of clear apple juices was observed.

Conclusions

PL is a novel non-thermal technology to inactivate pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms on foods. The significant microbial reductions in short treatment times, the limited energy cost of PL, the lack of residual compounds, and its great flexibility are some of the technique's major benefits. This method is clearly efficient in inactivating microorganisms in vitro, but its potential for real foods is still under investigation. Further studies need to be conducted to assess PL treatments' effects on food properties beyond safety and spoilage. There is a need for optimizing the critical process factors to achieve the target inactivation level for specific food applications without affecting quality. PL equipment with good penetration and short treatment times need to be designed for commercial purposes. Also, the applicability of PL treatments on an industrial scale needs to be compared with other nonthermal or conventional thermal processes.

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Lighting the Way Back for Astronauts - Light Therapy & NASA

In 1993, Quantum Devices, Inc. (QDI), of Barneveld, Wisconsin, began developing the HEALS (High Emissivity Aluminiferous Light-emitting Substrate) technology high-intensity, solid-state LED lighting systems for NASA Space Shuttle plant growth experiments. The company evolved out of cooperative efforts with the Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics (WCSAR) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison — a NASA center for the Commercial Development of Space. Ronald W. Ignatius, QDI’s president, and chairman represented one of WCSAR’s industrial partners at the time. WCSAR was conducting research on light sources for promoting food growth within closed environments where humans would be present for a long duration, such as the Space Shuttle and the International Space Station.

With the support of WCSAR, Ignatius experimented with LEDs, which provide high-energy efficiency and virtually no heat, despite releasing waves of light 10 times brighter than the Sun. Ignatius admits that some scientists involved in the project were skeptical at first, thinking that the idea of using LEDs to promote plant growth was far-fetched. However, the experiments demonstrated that red LED wavelengths could boost the energy metabolism of cells to advance plant growth and photosynthesis. This finding prompted Ignatius to develop a line of LED products that emit the exact wavelength of light that plants use in photosynthesis.

“Our company gives credit to Dr. Ray Bula, the director of WCSAR, for having the foresight to go against the prevailing dogma of the time and design the first plant experiment using monochromatic light to grow lettuce plants,” Ignatius proclaims.

In 1989, Ignatius formed QDI to bring the salt grain-sized LEDs to market. In October 1995, the light sources made their Space Shuttle flight debut on the second U.S. Microgravity Laboratory Spacelab mission (STS-73, Columbia).

Growing

When NASA determined that red LEDs could grow plants in space, Marshall Space Flight Center awarded QDI several Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts to investigate the broad-spectrum diodes' effectiveness in medical applications. The contracts, issued from 1995 to 1998, focused on increasing energy inside human cells. NASA hoped that the LEDs would yield medical benefits on Earth and stem bone and muscle mass loss in astronauts, which occurs during long periods of weightlessness. (In space, the lack of gravity keeps human cells from growing naturally.) Furthermore, since wounds are slow to heal in a microgravity environment, LED therapy could accelerate healing and keep what would be termed as minor wounds on Earth from becoming mission-catastrophic in space.

In addition to promoting cell growth, the red LEDs are capable of activating light-sensitive, tumor-treating drugs that, when injected intravenously, could destroy cancer cells while leaving surrounding tissue virtually untouched. The technique, approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in laboratory and human trials, is known as Photodynamic Therapy.

With the SBIR assistance from NASA, QDI set out to alter a surgical probe that could emit long waves of red light to stimulate a Benzoporphyrin-derivative drug called Photofrin, which delivers fewer post-operative side effects than comparable drugs. Ignatius also developed a friendly and successful working relationship with Dr. Harry Whelan, pediatric neurology and director of hyperbaric medicine at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. The two had met after Ignatius came across a newspaper article highlighting Whelan’s ground-breaking brain cancer surgery technique, which uses drugs stimulated by laser lights to accelerate healing. Accordingly, QDI provided more than $1.25 million from its SBIR contracts to support Whelan’s pioneering photobiomodulation research and bring him on board to help improve the surgical probe.

Collectively, Ignatius, Whelan, and researchers from NASA successfully altered the probe for pediatric brain tumors and the prevention of oral mucositis (a common side effect of chemotherapy and radiation treatments) in pediatric bone marrow transplant patients at the Medical College of Wisconsin. In May 1998, a 20-year-old female became the first patient to undergo surgery with the modified probe. The young woman had endured six brain surgeries and chemotherapy and radiation treatments over a span of 10 years, but her aggressive cancer kept coming back. Having exhausted all of her conventional treatment options, she turned to the NASA-sponsored Photodynamic Therapy technology.

During the procedure, surgeons excised as much of the recurring brain tumor as they could then injected the light-activated Photofrin into her bloodstream and inserted the LED probe into the remaining tumor tissue. The probe, which casts long wavelengths that generate less heat and penetrate deeper into tissue than the shorter wavelengths of traditional medical lasers, proved to be both safe and effective, as the tumor never returned, and the patient recovered with no complications. A second operation that took place 3 months later on a male patient was also deemed successful by Whelan and his Medical College of Wisconsin surgeons' team.

FDA-approved clinical trials continued at several other facilities over the next 3 years, including the Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, New York; Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke’s Medical Center in Chicago; and the Instituto de Oncologia Pediatrica in Sao Paulo, Brazil. QDI became recognized as a U.S. Space Foundation “Space Technology Hall of Fame” award recipient in 2000 and a Marshall Space Flight Center “Hallmark of Success” in 2004.

Product Outcome

The positive clinical trial results and continued support from NASA and follow-on research grants from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency helped QDI and the Medical College of Wisconsin fully transition space technology into a new, non-invasive medical device. The WARP 10 (Warfighter Accelerated Recovery by Photobiomodulation) is a high-intensity, hand-held, portable LED unit intended for the temporary relief of minor muscle and joint pain, arthritis, stiffness, and muscle spasms. It also promotes the relaxation of muscle tissue and increases local blood circulation. Unlike the surgical probe, the WARP 10 does not require intravenous medicine; instead, the unit can be placed directly on the skin where treatment is to occur.

The WARP 10 was designed to aid armed forces personnel on the front lines with immediate first aid care for minor injuries and pain, thereby improving combat endurance. The “soldier self-care” device produces 80 times more photon energy than a 250-Watt heat lamp, yet it remains cool to the touch. The power advantage reduces the time required for each therapeutic dose and provides for faster multi-dose exposures when needed, without the harmful effects of ultraviolet solar radiation. The U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. Navy are currently issuing WARP 10 to crews on submarines and Special Forces operations.

QDI has introduced an FDA-approved consumer version sharing the same power and properties of the military model as an alternative to the cost and complications associated with the overuse of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for persistent pain relief. According to a Mayo Clinic study, adverse events associated with the use of NSAIDs are reported more frequently to the FDA than such events associated with any other group of drugs. Furthermore, conservative calculations for the United States estimate that approximately 107,000 patients are hospitalized each year for NSAID-related gastrointestinal complications. At least 16,500 NSAID-related deaths occur annually among arthritis patients alone, according to compiled research.

References

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How Red Light Therapy Combats Arthritis Pain & Stiffness

When it comes to muscle and joint stiffness, osteoarthritis, and arthritis, the one thing in common is pain and inflammation. When suffering from joint and muscular conditions, a person’s range of motion decreases, and swelling and skin redness increase, making everyday tasks a struggle.

Many young to middle-aged people are unaware of these conditions as they’ve been labeled as conditions mainly for the elderly; however, things have changed.

Though these conditions are common within the elderly community, we’re seeing an increase among young adults. In the United States alone, 23% of adults — over 53 million people — have arthritis, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In other words, joint pain isn’t just for old age, as we once thought.

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) appears in every 8 in 100,000 people between 18 and 34 years old. Of course, no one — young or old — wants to wake up feeling joint stiffness, swelling, or pain every morning.

However, the old myth that arthritis is untreatable is about to be debunked with light therapy.

Naturally, a medical professional will have to make a conclusive arthritis diagnosis. However, once diagnosed, many people find home treatments to deal with the pain — like light therapy. And the people who are undergoing light therapy are receiving incredible pain relief from their treatment. For example, a study published in the Turkish Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation found that infrared light treatment on inflammatory arthritis of the spine (spondylitis) encouraged increased function and improved quality of life for participants.

But what’s the science behind red light therapy treating joint conditions? Red light therapy uses low levels of red light to stimulate a natural response to cell performance. The light penetrates through the layers of the dermis, entering the muscles and nerves. As the cells absorb the energy, they become more active, with increased blood flow to the treated area, promoting cell regrowth and regeneration. Through this combination of increased blood flow and cellular activity, it rapidly reduces inflammation and pain.

With the recent advancements in modern technology, those who have arthritis or other joint conditions no longer need to opt for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or corticosteroids. These forms of the medication come with serious side effects such as edema, heartburn, stomach ulcers, cataracts, bone loss, and elevated blood clots. This alternative non-invasive treatment allows people to choose a drug-free treatment that reduces swelling, inflammation, and pain through red light therapy.

A study published in the National Library of Medicine found that elderly patients who underwent red and infrared therapy treatment had reduced their pain by 50%. Besides, they found participants who underwent red and infrared light therapy had a significant improvement in function. Another study from 2016 saw a substantial reduction in pain and an increased range of motion after five to seven red light therapy treatments for Bouchard’s and Heberden’s osteoarthritis. These studies are only a few examples of how red light therapy shows results as an effective treatment.

A little red light can go a long way for your body, mind, and soul. More and more people recognize the benefits of red light therapy as a natural home treatment. For people suffering from any joint condition, red light therapy will reduce inflammation, eliminating joint and muscle pain.

But there’s more to red light therapy than this. It’s important to be reminded that light therapy also heals other ailments in the body. Red light therapy is effective for injuries, muscle recovery, cancer side effects, skincare, and depression.

With an FDA-approved and MDA-certified Lunas red light therapy device, users can achieve optimal therapeutic results by merely exposing their bare skin to the light for a few minutes per day. Healing yourself doesn’t need a lot of time or money; you need the right tools. Lunas light therapy devices have the power to heal bodies and minds all around the world.

Bipolar Disorder & Light Therapy

I have a friend who often shows extreme shifts in moods. Sometimes I see an extremely elevated mood, and sometimes, it's depression. On some days, I see episodes of uplifted feelings and depression at the same time.

Strange right!

Later I figured out that she was going through a mental illness called bipolar disorder. This isn’t a rare brain disorder. In fact, about 15 million U.S adults suffer from this disorder.

Bipolar disorder is a mental illness characterized by dramatic transfer in mood and behavior. Bipolar depression can last from several days to years, depending on the person's type and state.

Let’s put light on some of the unknown facts of Bipolar Disorder.

  • Firstly we need to understand that bipolar depression has several types. It is distinguished by profuse behaviors, moods, depression, and, yes, mixed emotions. The symptoms of this illness can present at different severities and in many combinations in different people. So, it may not be the same for every person who has Bipolar disorder.

We basically classify the states into two broad classes:

  • Manic — overly elevated emotions, increase in energy, higher self-confidence, and decreased need for sleep.
  • Depression — sad, worthless, suicidal, low feelings
  • It is possible that people can experience symptoms of mania and depression at the same time.
  • The length of mood episodes and varying behavior can vary from person to person.
  • There is no known single cause of this mental illness.
  • Not only adults but children and teenagers can have bipolar disorder too.
Light Therapy — the Bipolar Disorder Soother!

If we compare other types of depression, there are fewer treatments available for bipolar disorder.

Hence, it is important to find an effective treatment for your illness.

Antidepressant medications, on the other hand, are not clearly effective. They may aggravate the mood cycling in people with bipolar disorder. Also, many people with bipolar disorder are prescribed to take other medications like mood stabilizers.

That’s why it is important to go for a non-medication treatment, like light therapy!

But why is it recommended? Light therapy is more effective, non-invasive, and absolutely safe because it can be used without worrying about additional drug interactions.

But How Light Therapy Helps?

Humans have natural 24-hour clocks, which are disrupted in bipolar disorder. One way of treating bipolar disorder is to handle the circadian rhythm (24*7 natural cycle that regulates the physical, mental, and behavior changes). And this can be achieved with bright light therapy.

The light emitted during light therapy activates the retina in the eye, resulting in a stimulus being transmitted from the eye to the brain's hypothalamus. The hypothalamus is a part of the brain that has a vital role in regulating mood. It also helps control many bodily functions, such as the release of hormones from the pituitary gland and channelizing the mood.

The light acts through the eyes to regulate the biological clock located in a tiny brain region. There are disturbances in the biological clock that affect circadian rhythms in people with bipolar disorder, including hormonal rhythms, sleep, feelings, cognition, and other behaviors.

Light therapy triggers the hypothalamus and helps bipolar patients to calm their emotional flow and have normal behavior.

Studies have shown that light can affect the major neurotransmitters, or chemical messengers, involved in mood and behavior, e.g., serotonin and dopamine. So, light therapy may act similarly to antidepressants by directly working on these neurotransmitters.

We found trials of light therapy compared to a placebo in people with bipolar depression. The studies' results displayed a significant improvement in depressive symptoms with bright light compared to placebo conditions.

I recommended my friend to you light therapy, and that really helped her. The quality of personal life is great since then. If you are also like my friend who is dealing with bipolar disorder, you possibly got the remedy.

Remember, your Mental Health matters!!

References:

Stroke Incidents & Red Light Therapy

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 800,000 stroke incidents occur every year. No two-stroke incidents are the same. Stroke patients suffer complications such as loss of motor skills or partial paralysis on one side of the body.

A person can feel excruciating muscle pain, contractions for long periods of time, or spasms during the recovery process. This muscle tightness is known as spasticity or hypertonia. Sometimes patients experience muscle weakness down one side of the body, known as hemiparesis. One of the best treatments for muscle spasticity and strengthening muscle function is physical therapy.

The recovery process is dependent on the continued movement of the affected muscles. For example, some patients are known to keep their affected shoulder tense due to pain from the arm remaining relaxed and hanging. This leads to more complications, pain, and tightness. Everyday tasks such as lifting a fork, sweeping a floor, or driving a car can feel impossible for some. While pain is felt in the shoulder, arm, or leg muscles — these muscles are mostly healthy. It is the brain circuits and nerves between the brain's connection to these body parts that are damaged and need to be strengthened. Often, stroke patients do not find relief from even the strongest pain medication. Regardless, stimulating the muscles and pained areas with physical therapy strengthens the brain's connection and generates the healing process.

The National Library of Medicine has shared a study conducted in 2016 on stroke patients and red light therapy. The study concluded that red light therapy “may contribute to increased recruitment of muscle fibers and, hence, to increase the onset time of the spastic muscle fatigue, reducing pain intensity in stroke patients with spasticity, as has been observed in healthy subjects and athletes.” Another study from The National Library of Medicine on the effect of Photobiomodulation by red light-emitting diodes (LEDs) on nerve regeneration concluded with positive results. It was found in 2010 that “red to near-infrared LEDs have been shown to promote mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. In this study, LED irradiation improved nerve regeneration and increased antioxidation levels in the chamber fluid. Therefore, we propose that antioxidation induced by LEDs may be conducive to nerve regeneration.” Red light therapy works well to stimulate mitochondrial functions in cells and nerves. It can stimulate recovery 4 to 10 times faster than your body’s natural healing process.

Physical therapy is necessary for stroke patients, and when paired with full-body red light therapy, there is the potential to assist efforts towards pain reduction significantly. Photobiomodulation or red light therapy stimulates cells and helps repair the myelin sheath covering nerve fibers to accelerate their healing process and can have a positive effect on repairing broken neural pathways in the brain disrupted by stroke incidents.

In Kaiyan Medical, we develop all types of light therapy devices. We believe in the holistic approach to balance your body.

References

https://www.stroke.org.uk/sites/default/files/pain_after_stroke.pdf

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27299571/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20358337/#:~:text=Red%20to%20near%2Dinfrared%20LEDs,be%20conducive%20to%20nerve%20regeneration.

Brainwaves - Get to Know your Brain

Brain waves are oscillating electrical voltages in the brain, measuring just a few millionths of a volt. At the root of all our thoughts, emotions, and behaviors are the communication between neurons within our brains. Brainwaves are produced by synchronized electrical pulses from masses of neurons communicating with each other.

Brainwaves are detected using sensors placed on the scalp. They are divided into bandwidths to describe their functions but are the best thought of as a continuous spectrum of consciousness, from slow, loud, and functional — to fast, subtle, and complex.

It is a handy analogy to think of brainwaves as musical notes — the low-frequency waves are like a deeply penetrating drum beat, while the higher frequency brainwaves are more like a subtle high pitched flute. Like a symphony, the higher and lower frequencies link and cohere with each other through harmonics.

Our brainwaves change according to what we’re doing and feeling. When slower brainwaves are dominant, we can feel tired, slow, sluggish, or dreamy. The higher frequencies are dominant when we feel wired or hyper-alert.

The descriptions that follow are only broad descriptions — in practice, things are far more complex, and brainwaves reflect different aspects of different locations in the brain.

Brainwave speed is measured in Hertz (cycles per second), and they are divided into bands delineating slow, moderate, and fast waves.

Infra-low (

Infra-Low brainwaves (also known as Slow Cortical Potentials) are thought to be the basic cortical rhythms that underlie our higher brain functions. Very little is known about infra-low brainwaves. Their slow nature makes them difficult to detect and accurately measure, so few studies have been done. They appear to play a major role in brain timing and network function.

Delta (δ) Waves (0.5 TO 4HZ) — Sleep

Delta brainwaves are slow, loud brainwaves (low frequency and deeply penetrating, like a drumbeat). They are generated in deepest meditation and dreamless sleep. Delta waves suspend external awareness and are the source of empathy. Healing and regeneration are stimulated in this state, and that is why deep restorative sleep is so essential to the healing process.

Theta (θ) Waves (4 TO 8 HZ) — Deeply Relaxed, Inward-focused

Theta brainwaves occur most often in sleep but are also dominant in deep meditation. Theta is our gateway to learning, memory, and intuition. In theta, our senses are withdrawn from the external world and focused on signals originating from within. Twilight states that we normally only experience fleetingly as we wake or drift off to sleep. In theta, we dream; vivid imagery, intuition, and information beyond our normal conscious awareness. It’s where we hold our ‘stuff,’ our fears, troubled history, and nightmares.

Alpha (α) Waves(8 TO 12 HZ) — Very relaxed, Passive Attention

Alpha brainwaves are dominant during quietly flowing thoughts and in some meditative states. Alpha is ‘the power of now,’ being here, in the present. Alpha is the resting state of the brain. Alpha waves aid overall mental coordination, calmness, alertness, mind/body integration, and learning.

Beta (β) Waves(12 TO 35 HZ) — Anxiety dominant, Active, External Attention

Beta brainwaves dominate our normal waking state of consciousness when attention is directed towards cognitive tasks and the outside world. Beta is a ‘fast’ activity, present when alert, attentive, engaged in problem-solving, judgment, decision making, or focused mental activity.

Beta brainwaves are further divided into three bands; Lo-Beta (Beta1, 12–15Hz) can be thought of as a ‘fast idle’ or musing. Beta (Beta2, 15–22Hz) is the high engagement or actively figuring something out. Hi-Beta (Beta3, 22–38Hz) is a highly complex thought, integrating new experiences, high anxiety, or excitement. Continual high-frequency processing is not a very efficient way to run the brain, as it takes a tremendous amount of energy.

Gamma (γ) Waves(35 TO 42 HZ) — Concentration

Gamma brainwaves are the fastest brain waves (high frequency, like a flute) and relate to the simultaneous processing of information from different brain areas. Gamma brainwaves pass information rapidly and quietly. The most subtle of the brainwave frequencies, the mind has to be quiet to access gamma.

Gamma was dismissed as ‘spare brain noise’ until researchers discovered it was highly active in states of universal love, altruism, and the ‘higher virtues.’ Gamma is also above the frequency of neuronal firing, so how it is generated remains a mystery. It is speculated that gamma rhythms modulate perception and consciousness and that a greater presence of gamma relates to expanded consciousness and spiritual emergence.

New Trial to Test Brain Wave Stimulation as Alzheimer’s Preventative

With a new $1.8 million grant from the Part the Cloud-Gates Partnership Grant Program of the Alzheimer’s Association, researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Massachusetts General Hospital are launching a new clinical trial to test whether stimulating a key frequency of brain waves with light and sound can prevent the advance of Alzheimer’s disease pathology even before volunteers experience symptoms such as memory impairment.

“Because Alzheimer’s disease leads to neurodegeneration and cognitive decline, the best time for intervention may be before those symptoms even begin,” said Dr. Li-Huei Tsai, Picower Professor of Neuroscience and director of The Picower Institute for Learning and Memory at MIT. “We are hopeful that our safe, non-invasive approach of sensory stimulation of 40Hz gamma brain rhythms can have a preventative benefit for patients. We are very grateful to Part the Cloud-Gates Partnership Grant Program for their support in funding rigorous research to test this exciting possibility.”

In extensive testing in Tsai’s lab with multiple mouse models of Alzheimer’s, the light and sound stimulation technique, called Gamma ENtrainment Using Sensory Stimuli (GENUS), improved cognition and memory, prevented neurodegeneration, and reduced amyloid and tau protein buildups. The research showed that increasing 40Hz brain rhythm power and synchrony stimulated the brain’s immune cells and blood vessels to clear out the toxic proteins. Early results from human testing at MIT show that GENUS is well tolerated and increases 40Hz power and synchrony, just like in the mice.

The new study, conducted in collaboration with neurologist Dr. Keith Johnson at MGH, will enroll 50 volunteers aged 55 or older who show signs of amyloid protein plaque buildup in PET scans but remain cognitively normal. Experimental volunteers will receive an hour of GENUS light and sound stimulation in their homes daily for a year. At regular checkups, the team will monitor GENUS's effect on amyloid buildup via PET scans as well as other biomarkers such as tau and for changes in cognition, sleep, structural and functional MRI, and other indicators of brain function and health.

The trial will be double-blinded, randomized, and controlled, meaning that some volunteers will be exposed to non-GENUS light and sound during the trial to provide a non-treatment comparison group. To ensure that bias does not influence the results, neither the volunteers nor the experimenters will know which group's volunteers are.

References

https://picower.mit.edu/news/new-trial-test-brain-wave-stimulation-alzheimers-preventative

https://brainworksneurotherapy.com/what-are-brainwaves

Muse - The Brain Sensing Headband

Overview

Muse is a wearable device in the form of a headband that senses the brain's electrical rhythms (EEG). The headband is coupled with a smartphone app (Calm) that monitors the user’s brain electrical activity and gives immediate feedback to achieve a “calm” or meditative pattern. Over time, the use of this device is thought to help reduce distractibility, improve stress control, and improve mood.

Use

The headband is light and comfortable but requires a bit of experience to fit properly and to transmit reliable signals by BlueTooth to the associated smartphone app. The device will not work with older versions of many smartphones (such as the iPhone 4). The instructions for use are straightforward and easy to follow, and the program is up and running within minutes. Once one gets started, it is straightforward to adjust settings and to personalize the program.

UI

The user is asked to sit quietly with eyes closed and to focus on counting expirations. The app displays one of two pleasant visual backgrounds associated with wind or water sounds. The volume and frequency of these weather sound decrease as the EEG rhythm become the “calm” state. Therefore, one gets immediate and easy to understand feedback as to how one is doing. The sessions can be set to last from 3 minutes to 45 minutes.

Appropriateness

Immediately after finishing a session, the app provides a graphical depiction of one’s EEG rhythm, grouped into “calm,” “neutral,” or “active” bands. The app calculates the amount of time spent “calm” and awards points for “calm” time. The points are associated with certain awards and expressions of positive feedback. Besides, the app graphically displays the percentage of time spent “calm” over variations and prescribes several challenges to increase time performance. All times performance of this is lovely and easy to understand and to manipulate.

Account Management

The company’s website provides a great deal of information regarding frequently asked questions and troubleshooting. When I submitted a question to the company over the website, I received an answer within hours. The app allows one to permit for session data to be aggregated by the company for research purposes. I think it is useful to share personal data because they may ultimately determine how effective the device might be.

Scientific Basis

The Muse headband is a remarkable technological advance over earlier versions of EEG neurofeedback technologies. Neurofeedback is a technique that has been employed for mental health conditions for more than a decade and formerly required a link between traditional EEG recording devices with desktop or laptop computers. Through operant conditioning, these techniques seek to alter brain functioning by giving live feedback about EEG rhythms to the patient. Patients are rewarded if they can achieve certain EEG rhythm characteristics, such as decreased theta activity (4–7 cycles per second) or an increase in alpha activity (12–15 cycles per second). A higher proportion of alpha wave activity is thought to be associated with focused attention and a feeling of calm or well-being.

Traditional neurofeedback techniques have never been fully tested in psychiatric conditions for several reasons. First, these techniques are not protected by exclusive intellectual property, so industrial funding for large-scale trials has not been available. Similarly, devices designed to deliver neurofeedback have not been seen as unique medical devices by the FDA, which could be protected by patents. Furthermore, there is some disagreement about which pattern of EEG rhythms would be most therapeutic for particular groups of patients. I was not able to locate references to clinical trials using Muse technology specifically.
Although not formally approved for clinical use by the FDA, many clinics currently offer neurofeedback treatments. However, widespread clinical adoption of neurofeedback has not occurred due to concerns about cost relative to the uncertainties about efficacy. Most protocols recommended that individuals come to a supervised clinical setting for multiple sessions per week over several months. This is a time consuming and expensive endeavor which, due to lack of published scientific data on efficacy, is not reimbursed by insurance companies. With the Muse technology, EEG neurofeedback has entered the world of self-directed activity using a wearable device coupled with a smartphone app. Therefore, the cost is much reduced, and it becomes feasible to decide individually whether the techniques are a worthwhile investment of time.

Cost

The Muse headband costs $299, and the app is free. This appears to be a very reasonable cost, given the complexity of the technology and the amount of information obtained with its use.

Reviewed April 2015

References
  • ADHD
    Neurofeedback has been studied most extensively in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, for which at least 5 randomized controlled trials with mixed results have been published.
    Bink M, van Nieuwenhuizen C et al: Neurocognitive effects of neurofeedback in adolescents with ADHD: A randomized controlled trial. J Clin Psychiatry 75:535–542, 2014
  • Major Depression
    Peeters F, Oehlen M, et al.: Neurofeedback as a treatment for the major depressive disorder — a pilot study. PLoS One. 2014 Mar 18;9(3):e91837. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0091837. eCollection 2014
  • Performance Anxiety
    Gruzelier JH, Thompson T et al: Application of alpha/theta neurofeedback and heart rate variability training to young contemporary dancers: state anxiety and creativity. Int J Psychophysiol 93:105–111, 2014
  • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
    Koprivova J, Congedo M et al: Prediction of treatment response and the effect of independent component neurofeedback in obsessive-compulsive disorder: a randomized, sham-controlled, double-blind study. Neuropsychology 67:210–223, 2013
  • Reading Disabilities
    Nazari MA, Mosanezhad E et al.: The effectiveness of neurofeedback training on EEG coherence and neuropsychological functions in children with reading disability. Clin EEG Neurosci, 43:315–322, 2012
  • Autism Spectrum Disorders
    Kouijzer ME, van Schie HT et al.: Is EEG-biofeedback an effective treatment in autism spectrum disorders? A randomized controlled trial. Appl Psychophsiolo Biofeedback 38:17–28, 2013
  • Traumatic Brain Injury
    Nelson DV, Esty ML: Neurotherapy of traumatic brain injury/posttraumatic stress symptoms in OEF/OIF veterans. J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci 24:237–240, 2012
  • Insomnia
    Hammer BU, Colbert AP, et al.: Neurofeedback for insomnia: a pilot study of Z-score SMR and individualized protocols. Appl Psychophysiol Biofeedback 36:251–264, 2011.
  • Several other studies have proposed benefits in cognitive performance for normal subjects or in meditators.
  • Gruzelier JH: EEG-neurofeedback for optimizing performance. I: A review of cognitive and affective outcomes in health participants. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews 44:124–141, 2014
  • Ros T, Munneke MAM, Ruge D, Gruzelier JH, and Rothwell JC: Endogenous control of waking brain rhythms induces neuroplasticity in humans. European Journal of Neuroscience, 31:770–778, 2010
  • Vidyarthi J and Riecke BE: Interactively mediating experiences of mindfulness meditation. International Journal of Human-Computer Studies 72:674–688, 2014


Hyperbaric Chambers - Oxygen Therapy

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy involves breathing pure oxygen in a pressurized environment. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is a well-established treatment for decompression sickness, potential risk of scuba diving. Other conditions treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy include serious infections, bubbles of air in your blood vessels, and wounds that may not heal due to diabetes or radiation injury.

In a hyperbaric oxygen therapy chamber, the air pressure is increased two to three times higher than normal air pressure. Under these conditions, your lungs can gather much more oxygen than would be possible breathing pure oxygen at normal air pressure.

When your blood carries this extra oxygen throughout your body, this helps fight bacteria and stimulate the release of substances called growth factors and stem cells, which promote healing.

Your body’s tissues need an adequate supply of oxygen to function. When tissue is injured, it requires even more oxygen to survive. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy increases the amount of oxygen your blood can carry. With repeated scheduled treatments, the temporary extra high oxygen levels encourage normal tissue oxygen levels, even after the therapy is completed.

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is used to treat several medical conditions. And medical institutions use it in different ways. Your doctor may suggest hyperbaric oxygen therapy if you have one of the following conditions:

  • Severe anemia
  • Brain abscess
  • Bubbles of air in your blood vessels (arterial gas embolism)
  • Burns
  • Carbon monoxide poisoning
  • Crushing injury
  • Deafness, sudden
  • Decompression sickness
  • Gangrene
  • Infection of skin or bone that causes tissue death
  • Non-healing wounds, such as a diabetic foot ulcer
  • Radiation injury
  • Skin graft or skin flap at risk of tissue death
  • Traumatic brain injury
  • Vision loss, sudden and painless
Risks

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is generally a safe procedure. Complications are rare. But this treatment does carry some risk.

Potential risks include:

  • Middle ear injuries, including leaking fluid and eardrum rupture, due to changes in air pressure
  • Temporary nearsightedness (myopia) caused by temporary eye lens changes
  • Lung collapse caused by air pressure changes (barotrauma)
  • Seizures as a result of too much oxygen (oxygen toxicity) in your central nervous system
  • Lowered blood sugar in people who have diabetes treated with insulin
  • In certain circumstances, fire — due to the oxygen-rich environment of the treatment chamber.
How to Prepare

You’ll be provided with a hospital-approved gown or scrubs to wear in place of regular clothing during the procedure.

For your safety, items such as lighters or battery-powered devices that generate heat are not allowed into the hyperbaric chamber. You may also need to remove hair and skin care products that are petroleum-based, as they are a potential fire hazard. Your health care team will provide instruction on preparing you to undergo hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

During Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is typically performed as an outpatient procedure but can also be provided while hospitalized.

In general, there are two types of hyperbaric oxygen chambers:

  • A unit designed for 1 person. In an individual (monoplace) unit, you lie down on a table that slides into a clear plastic chamber.
  • A room designed to accommodate several people. In a multi-person hyperbaric oxygen room — which usually looks like a large hospital room — you may sit or lie down. You may receive oxygen through a mask over your face or a lightweight, clear hood placed over your head.

Whether you’re in an individual or multi-person environment for hyperbaric oxygen therapy, the benefits are the same.

During therapy, the room's air pressure is about two to three times the normal air pressure. The increased air pressure will create a temporary feeling of fullness in your ears — similar to what you might feel in an airplane or at a high elevation. You can relieve that feeling by yawning or swallowing.

For most conditions, hyperbaric oxygen therapy lasts approximately two hours. Members of your health care team will monitor you and the therapy unit throughout your treatment.

After Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

Your therapy team assesses you, including looking in your ears and taking your blood pressure and pulse. If you have diabetes, your blood glucose is checked. Once the team decides you are ready, you can get dressed and leave.

You may feel somewhat tired or hungry following your treatment. This doesn’t limit normal activities.

Conclusions

To benefit from hyperbaric oxygen therapy, you’ll likely need more than one session. The number of sessions is dependent upon your medical condition. Some conditions, such as carbon monoxide poisoning, might be treated in three visits. Others, such as non-healing wounds, may require 40 treatments or more.

To effectively treat approved medical conditions, hyperbaric oxygen therapy is usually part of a comprehensive treatment plan provided with other therapies and drugs designed to fit your individual needs.

The Frozen Healer - Cryotherapy

Cryotherapy is a trend with a cult following in the recovery, wellness, and beauty industries. It can be used in combination with light therapy for better results. You may have heard people talking about it or seen celebrities or athletes posting themselves coming out of icy cold chambers on social media, but what is Cryotherapy? Why is everyone talking about it?

In its most basic form, Cryotherapy is simply the use of cold temperatures to heal the body. Using the cold to help our bodies recover from injury, inflammation, soreness, or relaxation has been used since the beginning. Putting ice on a wound or bruise, jumping in a cold lake, or taking an ice bath are basic cryotherapy forms. These methods cause stagnant blood to start moving again, promoting new blood flow, which brings healing. It is a fundamental, well-understood principle that has been widely accepted and used as a means of after the fact recovery but can be quite uncomfortable, inconvenient, and extremely inefficient compared to modern-day cryotherapy through the use of cryotherapy chambers.

Day by day

Modern-day cryotherapy lends from past cold modalities to provide a much more comfortable, convenient, and effective recovery through cryotherapy chambers. Cryotherapy chambers provide a quick, 2–3 minute private session of whole-body exposure to shallow temperatures in a dry, contained, breathable air environment. Add in some music, light therapy, and awesome fog from the cold, and it becomes a fun experience that completely distracts from how cold you just got!

The goal of true whole body cryotherapy is to expose as much skin as possible to temperatures of -166F or below for a short period of time (2–3 minutes) to create a drop in the external skin temperature of 30–40 degrees. The best way to measure this is to use an infrared temperature device before and after the session on the upper arm's back, measuring the two temperature readings' delta.

Effects of Cryotherapy

Blood rushing to the core is our body’s natural way of protecting our core organs from extreme cold. When exposed to freezing temperatures, blood rushes from our extremities to our core, creating a systemic response throughout the body that produces many benefits. Cold promotes increased blood flow, bringing fresh, oxygenated blood full of white blood cells to the body's areas that need it. Cryotherapy amplifies these positive effects and adds many more incredible benefits by activating the vagus nerve and causing vasoconstriction and vasodilation. The vagus nerve is responsible for the regulation of internal organ functions [NCBI]. The vagus nerve is activated by cold on the back of the neck and touches every major organ in the body.

Whole Body Cryotherapy is not just for extreme athletes or those with present injuries, either. The best practice is for healthy, normal adults (minors with doctors) to regularly practice whole body cryotherapy 3–5 times per week. It is important to maintain a constant cryotherapy regimen and not just use it when you feel you need it or are injured. It is a continual recovery modality that helps the body stay healthy and even resist injuries and illness.

Light to Manage Neuropathic Pain

Imagine that the movement of a single hair on your arm causes severe pain. For patients with neuropathic pain — a chronic illness affecting 7 to 8% of the European population, with no effective treatment — this can be a daily reality.

Scientists from EMBL Rome have now identified a special population of nerve cells in the skin that are responsible for sensitivity to gentle touch. These are also the cells that cause severe pain in patients with neuropathic pain. The research team, led by EMBL group leader Paul Heppenstall, developed a light-sensitive chemical that selectively binds to this nerve cell type. By first injecting the affected skin area with the chemical and then illuminating it with near-infrared light, the targeted nerve cells retract from the skin’s surface, leading to pain relief. Nature Communications publishes the results on 24 April 2018.

The Spicy Effect

By clipping off the nerve endings with light, the gentle touch that can cause severe pain in neuropathic patients is no longer felt. “It’s like eating a strong pepper, which burns the nerve endings in your mouth and desensitizes them for some time,” says Heppenstall. “The nice thing about our technique is that we can specifically target the small subgroup of neurons, causing neuropathic pain.”

There are many different nerve cells in your skin, which make you feel specific sensations like vibration, cold, heat, or normal pain. These cells are not affected by the light treatment at all. The skin is only desensitized to the gentlest touch, like a breeze, tickling, or an insect crawling across your skin.

Illumination vs. Drugs

Previous attempts to develop drugs to treat neuropathic pain have mostly focused on targeting single molecules. “We think, however, that there’s not one single molecule responsible. There are many,” Heppenstall explains. “You might be able to succeed in blocking one or a couple, but others would take over the same function eventually. With our new illumination method, we avoid this problem altogether.”

Touch and pain were assessed by measuring reflexes in mice affected by neuropathic pain in their limbs. Affected mice will normally quickly withdraw their paw when it is gently touched. After the light therapy, however, they exhibited normal reflexes upon gentle touch. The therapy's effect lasts for a few weeks, after which the nerve endings grow back, and gentle touch causes pain again.

The team also investigated human skin tissue. The tissue's overall makeup and the specifics of the neurons of interest appear to be similar, indicating that the method might be effective in managing neuropathic pain in humans. “In the end, we aim to solve the problem of pain in both humans and animals,” says Heppenstall. “Of course, a lot of work needs to be done before we can do a similar study in people with neuropathic pain. That’s why we’re now actively looking for partners and are open for new collaborations to develop this method further, with the hope of one day using it in the clinic.”

How Intense Light can Protect Against Heart Attacks

Researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found that intense light amplifies a specific gene that bolsters blood vessels and offers protection against heart attacks.

"We already knew that intense light can protect against heart attacks, but now we have found the mechanism behind it.”

Study’s senior author Tobias Eckle, MD, PhD, professor of anesthesiology, University of Colorado School of Medicine

The study was published recently in the journal Cell Reports.

The scientists discovered that housing mice under intense light conditions for one week robustly enhances cardioprotection, which resulted in a dramatic reduction of cardiac tissue damage after a heart attack. They also found that humans could potentially benefit from a similar light exposure strategy.

To find out why they developed a strategy to protect the heart using intense light to target and manipulate the function of the PER2 gene, which is expressed in a circadian pattern in the part of the brain that controls circadian rhythms.

By amplifying this gene through light, they found that it protected cardiovascular tissues against low oxygen conditions like myocardial ischemia, caused by reduced oxygen flow to the heart.

They also discovered that the light increased cardiac adenosine, a chemical that plays a role in blood flow regulation.

Mice that were blind, however, enjoyed no cardioprotection indicating a need for visual light perception.

Next, they investigated whether intense light had similar effects on healthy human volunteers. The subjects were exposed to 30 minutes of intense light measured in lumens. In this case, volunteers were exposed to 10,000 LUX, or lumens, on five consecutive days. Researchers also did serial blood draws.

The light therapy increased PER2 levels as it did in mice. Plasma triglycerides, a surrogate for insulin sensitivity and carbohydrate metabolism, significantly decreased. Overall, the therapy improved metabolism.

Eckle has long known that light plays a critical role in cardiovascular health and regulating biological processes. He pointed out that past studies have shown an increase in myocardial infarctions during darker winter months in all U.S. states, including sunnier places like Arizona, Hawaii, and California. The duration of the light isn’t as important as the intensity, he said.

“The most dramatic event in the history of the earth was the arrival of sunlight,” Eckle said. “Sunlight caused a great oxygen event. With sunlight, trillions of algae could now make oxygen, transforming the entire planet.”

Eckle said the study shows, on a molecular level, that intensive light therapy offers a promising strategy in treating or preventing low oxygen conditions like myocardial ischemia.

He said if the therapy is given before high-risk cardiac and non-cardiac surgery, it could offer protection against injury to the heart muscle, which can be fatal.

“Giving patients light therapy for a week before surgery could increase cardioprotection,” he said. “Drugs could also be developed that offer similar protections based on these findings. However, future studies in humans will be necessary to understand the impact of intense light therapy and its potential for cardioprotection.”

Source:

University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Journal reference:

Oyama, Y. et al. (2019) Intense Light-Mediated Circadian Cardioprotection via Transcriptional Reprogramming of the Endothelium. Cell Reports. doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2019.07.020.


How Light Ignites an Internal Fire - Lack of Exposure to Light may Increase Metabolic Syndrome Risk

Yes, fat cells deep under your skin can sense light. And when bodies do not get enough exposure to the right kinds of light, fat cells behave differently.

This discovery, published Jan. 21, 2020, in the journal Cell Reports, was uncovered by scientists at Cincinnati Children’s who were studying how mice control their body temperature. What they found has implications far beyond describing how mice stay warm.

The study shows that light exposure regulates how two kinds of fat cells work together to produce the raw materials that all other cells use for energy. The study authors say that disruptions to this fundamental metabolic process appear to reflect an unhealthy aspect of modern life — spending too much time indoors.

Our bodies evolved over the years under the sun’s light, including developing light-sensing genes called opsins. But now we live so much of our days under artificial light, which does not provide the full spectrum of light we all get from the sun.”

Richard Lang, PhD, developmental biologist and senior author of the study.

Lang directs the Visual Systems Group at Cincinnati Children’s and has authored or co-authored more than 120 research papers, including many related to eye development and how light interacts with cells beyond the eye.

“This paper represents a significant change in the way we view the effects of light on our bodies,” Lang says.

Shining New Light on the Role of Light

Many people understand that certain wavelengths of light can be harmful, such as gamma radiation from a nuclear bomb or too much ultraviolet light from the sun burning our skin. This study from Lang and colleagues describes a different, healthy role for light exposure.

Despite the fur of a mouse or a person's clothing, light does get inside our bodies. Photons — the fundamental particles of light — may slow down and scatter around once they pass the outer layers of skin, Lang says. But they really do get in, and when they do, they affect how cells behave.

In this direction, Lang’s work dates back to 2013 when he led a study published in Nature, which demonstrated how light exposure affected fetal mice's eye development. More recently, in 2019, Lang and colleagues published two more papers, one in April in Nature Cell Biology that reported possible benefits of light therapy for eye development in preterm infants, and another study in October in Current Biology that details how light receptors in the skin help mice regulate their internal clocks.

The new study in Cell Reports includes important contributions from Russell Van Gelder, MD, Ph.D., and Ethan Buhr, Ph.D., from the University of Washington, Randy Seeley, Ph.D., University of Michigan.

“This idea of light penetration into deep tissue is very new, even to many of my scientific colleagues,” Lang says. “But we and others have been finding opsins located in a variety of tissue types. This is still just the beginning of this work.”
How Light Ignites an Internal Fire

In the latest findings, the research team studied how mice respond when exposed to chilly temperatures — about 40° F. They already knew that mice, much like humans, use both a shivering response and an internal fat-burning response to heat themselves.

Deeper analysis revealed that the internal heating process is compromised in the absence of the gene OPN3 and exposure, specifically to a 480-nanometer wavelength of blue light. This wavelength is a natural part of sunlight but occurs only at low levels in most artificial light.

When light exposure occurs, OPN3 prompts white fat cells to release fatty acids into the bloodstream. Various types of cells can use these fatty acids as energy to fuel their activities. But brown fat literally burns the fatty acids (in a process called oxidation) to generate heat that warms up the chilly mice.

When mice were bred to lack the OPN3 gene, they failed to warm up other mice when placed in chilly conditions. But surprisingly, even mice with the correct gene failed to warm up when exposed to light that lacked the blue wavelength.

This data prompted the team to conclude that sunlight is required for normal energy metabolism. At least in mice. While the scientists strongly suspect that a similar light-dependent metabolic pathway exists in humans, they need to complete another series of experiments to prove it.

“If the light-OPN3 adipocyte pathway exists in humans, there are potentially broad implications for human health,” the study states. “Our modern lifestyle subjects us to unnatural lighting spectra, exposure to light at night, shift work, and jet lag, all of which result in metabolic disruption. Based on the current findings, insufficient stimulation of the light-OPN3 adipocyte pathway may be part of an explanation for the prevalence of metabolic deregulation in industrialized nations where unnatural lighting has become the norm.”

What’s Next?

It likely will require several years of study to flesh out this discovery. Someday, in theory, “light therapy” could become a method for preventing metabolic syndrome from developing into diabetes. Replacing indoor lights with better, full-spectrum lighting systems also could improve public health, Lang says.

However, more study is needed to pin down the potential therapeutic value of light therapy. Questions to answer include determining how much sunlight is needed to support a healthy metabolism and whether people battling obesity might lack a functional OPN3 gene in their fat cells. Also unknown: when would light therapy matter most: for pregnant mothers? For infants and children? Or for fully developed adults?

Source:

Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center

Journal reference:

Opsin 3-Dependent Adipocyte Light Sensing enhances Nayak, G., et al. (2020) Adaptive Thermogenesis in Mice. Cell Reports. doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2019.12.043.

Light Therapy can Benefit Patients with TBI (Traumatic Brain Injury)

According to a pioneering study by researchers from the Wellman Center for Photomedicine at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), light therapy is safe and has measurable effects on the brain.

Senior investigators Rajiv Gupta, MD, Ph.D., director of the Ultra-High Resolution Volume CT Lab at MGH and Benjamin Vakoc, Ph.D., at the Wellman Center led the study, which was supported by a grant from the Department of Defense (DOD) and published in JAMA Network Open September 14th.

This study is one of the first, if not the first, prospective, randomized, interventional clinical trials of near-infrared, low-level light therapy (LLLT) in patients who recently suffered a moderate brain injury. If further trials support these findings, light therapy could become the first widely-accepted treatment for this type of injury.

TBI is the leading cause of traumatic injury worldwide, and an estimated 69 million people experience such an injury every year. However, there are no treatments for this condition yet, largely because the underlying biological mechanisms are not well understood. It is so challenging to do studies with actual patients in the acute stage of trauma.

"The Gulf War put TBI in the headlines because body armor had been greatly improved by then. But there were still brain injuries caused by the shock waves from high powered explosives.”

Rajiv Gupta, MD, PhD, Director, Ultra-High Resolution Volume CT Lab

For various reasons, the number of TBIs has increased around the globe since then, but effective treatments are still sorely needed. For this study, a special helmet had to be designed specifically to deliver the therapy, an undertaking that required a mix of medical, engineering, and physics expertise.

This multidisciplinary team included Gupta, a neuroradiologist, Vakoc, an applied physicist, and others specializing in developing and translating optical instrumentation to the clinic and biologic laboratories. Both Gupta and Vakoc are also associate professors at Harvard Medical School.

“For this study, we designed a practical, near-infrared treatment based on Wellman Center research and working directly with DOD on the vexing problem of TBI, a condition faced by so many,” says Rox Anderson, MD, the center’s director.

Another challenge was optimizing the wavelength of the near-infrared LLLT.

“Nobody knows how much light you need to get the optimal effect,”

explains Lynn Drake, MD, one of the study co-authors and director of business development at the Wellman Center.

“We tried to optimize the wavelength, dosing, timing of delivery, and length of exposure.”

This was done through a series of pre-clinical experiments led by Anderson. These included multiple preclinical studies led by Michael Hamblin, Ph.D. Anderson and Hamblin are both co-authors of this paper.

Near-infrared LLLT has already been considered for multiple uses, but to date, few if any studies of this technology have been tested and none in patients with TBI.

It has been studied in stroke patients, and Wellman's basic laboratory research suggests it is neuroprotective through a mechanism mediated by specialized intracellular organs called mitochondria. It took several years of research at Wellman to understand the basic mechanism before the clinical trial.

The randomized clinical trial included 68 patients with moderate traumatic brain injury who were divided into two groups. One group received LLLT via the special helmet, which delivered the light. Patients in the control group wore the helmet for the same amount of time but did not receive the treatment.

Vakoc’s team at Wellman designed the helmet. During the study, the subjects’ brains were tested for neuron activity using quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) metrics, and the subjects also underwent neurocognitive function assessment.

MRI was performed in the acute (within 72 hours of the injury), early subacute (2–3 weeks), and late subacute (approximately three months) stages of recovery. During each visit and at six months, clinical assessments were performed using the Rivermead Post-Concussion Questionnaire, with each item assessed on a five-point scale.

Twenty-eight patients completed at least one LLLT session, and none reported any adverse reactions. Also, the researchers found that they could measure the effects of transcranial LLLT on the brain.

The MRI studies showed statistically significant differences in myelin's integrity surrounding the neurons of treated patients versus the control group. Both these findings support follow-up trials, especially since there are no other treatments for these patients.

The study also showed that light does impact the cells. While it is well established that cells have light receptors, “going into this trial, we had several unanswered questions such as whether the light would go through the scalp and skull, whether the dose was sufficient, and whether it would be enough to engage the neural substrates responsible for repair after TBI,” says Gupta.

It’s important to note, and he adds that for this initial study, the researchers focused on patients with moderate traumatic brain injury. That helped ensure their study could have statistically significant findings because patients in this category are more likely to demonstrate a measurable effect.

“It would be much more difficult to see such changes in patients with mild injuries, and it is quite likely that in patients with severe brain injuries, the effect of light therapy would be confounded by other comorbidities of severe trauma,”

says Gupta.

He adds that researchers are still very early in the development of this therapy. It is unknown if it could be applied to other types of brain injury, such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), which has received a lot of public attention over the last few years.

CTE is a progressive degenerative disease associated with a history of repetitive brain trauma such as that experienced by certain athletes, most notably football players.

This study opens up many possibilities for the broader use of photomedicine. “Transcranial LED therapy is a promising area of research, with potential to help various brain disorders where therapies are limited,” says Margaret Naeser, Ph.D., a prominent researcher in photomedicine and research professor of Neurology at Boston University School of Medicine. She was not affiliated with this particular study.

Source:

Massachusetts General Hospital

Journal reference:

Longo, M, G. F., et al. (2020) Effect of Transcranial Low-Level Light Therapy vs. Sham Therapy Among Patients With Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury. doi.org/10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2020.17337.

Half a Trillion-Dollar Market  —  Men.

There’s an emerging disruptor in the beauty industry as companies target a different consumer type to expand the half a trillion-dollar market — men.

Across the globe, men’s adoption of beauty use is already starting to take off. But the trend comes in many different shapes and forms. For beauty companies struggling to find new avenues of growth, it’s a huge opportunity to see whether men are looking for traditional grooming products, discreet moisturizers, beauty balms, or popular light therapy.

According to Allied Market Research, the men’s personal care industry is predicted to hit $166 billion by 2022. According to market researcher NPD Group, just last year, men’s skin-care products alone saw a more than 7% jump in sales and with the category currently valued at $122 million.

“In recent years, the notion that men can’t or shouldn’t be using skin-care products or caring more in general about all aspects of their appearance has been receding,”

Said Andrew Stablein, a research analyst at Euromonitor International, in a research note.

The success of digitally native brands catered directly to men such as Harry’s and popular subscription service Dollar Shave Club reveal

“the average men’s grooming routine isn’t about just shaving, but can be aided by using skin-care products,”

Stablein said.

Even high-end designers like Chanel have jumped on the trend, launching its first made-for-men skincare and cosmetics line known as “Boy De Chanel” last September.

“It seems that mass players are trying to expand their market and gain share in a slowing market by growing their user base,”

Said Alison Gaither, beauty and personal care analyst at Mintel.

This includes tutorials from U.K. makeup artist Charlotte Tilbury and Rihanna’s Fenty brand, which have both put out instructions for guys who want to use makeup subtly for a more groomed appearance.

According to Coresight Research, the Asia Pacific market is now one of the fastest-growing regions for men’s grooming and cosmetic product use. Jason Chen, general manager for Chinese online retail site Tmall, told Coresight that “supply cannot meet the demand for male make-up products across China.”

However, recent data suggests the new generation of beauty consumers prefer a non-binary approach altogether. According to NPD’s iGen Beauty Consumer report, nearly 40% of adults aged 18–22 have shown interest in gender-neutral beauty products and holistic products.

“There are so many … [people] growing up with the idea that you’re not tied to the gender you’re born with,”

Said Larissa Jensen, a beauty industry analyst at NPD.

“Beauty is no longer what you’re putting out as ‘ideal beauty.’ Beauty can be anything, anyone, and any gender.”

In 2016, shortly after Coty acquired CoverGirl, the brand made history with its first-ever “CoverBoy” featuring popular YouTube makeup artist James Charles.

Charles recently found himself in a very public spat with Tati Westbrook, another YouTube beauty vlogger. Coverage of the feud, which began after Charles backed a vitamin brand that was a rival to Westbrook’s own, has been widespread and shows the influence these internet personalities have and how the business has evolved over the past two years.

While Charles may be having his struggles now, as he has lost millions of subscribers, the attention he originally received from CoverGirl sparked similar collaborations by major brands including L’Oreal, who featured beauty blogger Manny Gutierrez, known under the moniker Manny MUA, as the face of its Maybelline Colossal mascara campaign in 2017.

“I think a lot of people misconstrue a man wearing makeup as someone that is transgender or someone that wants to be a drag queen, but it’s not that,”

Guitterez, founder and CEO of Lunar beauty told CNBC.

“I think right now people are still intimidated by the aspect of it.”

Gutierrez’s makeup tutorials and product reviews have attracted nearly 5 million subscribers to his YouTube page. According to a note by the NPD Group, one setting powder product saw a 40% surge in sales after Gutierrez promoted it on his YouTube channel.

“It’s all about inclusivity and encouraging people to be a little more inclusive with both men and women,”

Said Gutierrez.

“I think that as time progresses and you see more men in beauty, it’ll get a little bit better and better.”



How Effective is Blue Light Therapy for Spider Veins?

Medical spas often recommend Blue light therapy for spider veins because they don’t have to be administered by trained doctors. And, yes, after several expensive sessions, you might start seeing a difference. The most effective method to treat spider veins is Sclerotherapy. We’ll also discuss the benefits of using Sclerotherapy is an effective alternative.

What are Spider Veins?

Before discussing how to treat spider veins with blue light therapy or sclerotherapy, we need to discuss what causes spider veins.

Spider Veins, scientifically called Telangiectasias, are a small network of blood vessels visible just under the skin's surface. They are called “spider veins” because they look like red spider webs.

Spider veins generally occur on the legs, feet, thighs, and face. They can also cause slight pain and discomfort.

Causes and Dangers of Spider Veins

While spider veins aren’t dangerous in and of themselves, they can indicate underlying vein disease.

Vein Disease, also known as Chronic Venous Insufficiency, is a disease in which the valves in the veins malfunction. The valves are usually supposed to act as one-way doors and facilitate blood flow to the heart. However, when they malfunction, blood flows back down and pools around the legs. This can put pressure on the veins and lead to spider veins or varicose veins.

While spider veins themselves aren’t dangerous, vein disease is hazardous and needs to be treated immediately. If left untreated, venous insufficiency can result in bleeding, skin infections, and ulcers.

In the worst-case scenario, vein disease can also lead to Deep Vein Thrombosis, a medical condition in which blood clots in the veins. If the clotted blood breaks, it can get carried to the lungs, leading to a potentially fatal condition called Pulmonary Embolism.

What is Blue Light Therapy for Spider Veins?

Blue Light Therapy for spider veins is a method in which blue light or laser is used to treat spider veins. The laser is non-UV in nature and emits photons that generate heat. The heat can destroy the damaged blood vessel over time. As such, the damaged vein shrinks and eventually dissolves.

Advantages of Blue Light Therapy for Spider Veins

The only time that blue light therapy for spider veins has an advantage over sclerotherapy is when it comes to the foot or face.

Both the face and the foot are dense with venous-arterial connections. When using Sclerotherapy, the Sclero has to be injected into the veins. Injecting it into the arteries can be dangerous. Most conservative physicians prefer not to use Sclerotherapy for spider veins in the face or foot.

As such, it’s better to go for blue light therapy for spider veins in the face or foot.

Sclerotherapy: An Alternative to Blue Light Therapy for Spider Veins

Sclerotherapy is the most effective and permanent method to treat spider veins. It is a minimally-invasive procedure in which a medicine called Sclerosant is injected into the damaged vein.

The Sclerosant inflicts some chemical damage to the veins, which leads to the vein walls sticking together and eventually closing up. The blood is then routed to healthier veins, and the damaged vein eventually gets reabsorbed.

Advantages of Sclerotherapy for Spider Veins

There are multiple advantages of using Sclerotherapy to treat spider veins:

  • The process is minimally-invasive and non-surgical in nature.
  • Sclerotherapy doesn’t hurt or cause much discomfort.
  • It works immediately, and you don’t need to come back for multiple treatment sessions.
  • It can get rid of spider veins permanently.
  • The entire process takes just about 30 minutes.
  • You can resume your daily activities immediately after.
  • It is cheaper than Blue Light Therapy.


The Light for your Wounds

I remember how I used to come home with a bruise or cut every day after playing basketball in my childhood. Cuts and bruises were a part of the game, but my mother never took them lightly.

They may not seem like a tiny problem, but sometimes even a small wound can affect critical ways. It can lead to an infection as the cut exposes your body to external bacteria. This is why it important not to neglect the wounds.

What Happens When we Get a Cut?

Do you know what exactly happens when we get a cut?

In a small cut, the skin gets punctured, and the regular blood vessels get damaged. The effect is on the dermis layer. Whereas in the case of a deep cut, the impact is majorly on the tissues and the blood vessels break down completely results bleeding.

How our Body Reacts to Wounds?

When you get a cut, the body gets help from cells like neutrophils and immune cells. The section starts clotting the blood and reduces the blood flow. Antibodies, proteins clean up the site and eat the dead skin cells and other wastes.

Once the cut is free from germs, the skin growth gets started, and your body starts to rebuild the lost tissues and fix the broken blood vessels with the new ones. This repair work is done by cells called fibroblasts. In the last stage of wound healing, a lot of remodeling done to make the vessels and tissue functional again.

(Image source: https://askabiologist.asu.edu/)

The Light on the Wounds

No wonder science and technology have covered a long way to make human life easier. Now wounds can be treated with light therapy.

Yes, light therapy!!

That sounds out of the ordinary. But light therapy can heal your wounds by 200%!!

Wounds that Can be Treated by Light Therapy

Since wounds are of different types, wounds can be open or closed wounds. According to reports, LED light therapy can treat non-healing wounds, i.e., that doesn’t heal after 4 weeks. People with the following types of wounds can be healed from LED light therapy:

• Diabetic ulcers

• Venous ulcers

• Pressure ulcers

• Non-healing surgical wounds

• Serious burns

• Oral sores from chemotherapy/radiation

• Metabolic-disease-related wounds

• Wounds that repeatedly break down

How Red and Near-Infrared light Works for Wound

Light therapy a broad range of light having different wavelengths. Red light (620 nm — 680 nm) is visible red light, whereas Near-Infrared light (700nm — 1100nm) is invisible. Many studies reported that biologists have found that treating the cells with near-infrared light can grow 150% to 200% faster than cells not stimulated by light.

Biologically the Near-Infrared light boosts microcirculation and formation of new capillaries at the wound section.

Infrared light rays increase cellular energy that speeds up any healing process and penetrates deeper into the skin. As a result, the wound section receives more oxygen and nutrients to naturally help with the wound's healing process.

The light nurtures the lymph system activity. This assists with the detoxification process of the wound without overtaxing the lymph system and prevents lymphedema. The near-infrared rays also clean up the dead or damaged cells, making a clear blood circulation path.

Another benefit of Infrared therapy is that it helps release ATP (raw cellular energy), which gives energy to the damaged cells in the wound to heal better and faster (study).

Not only this, the studies have shown that the wound size also decreased by up to 36%.

Source: www.slideshare.net/amintalebi1/light-and-wound-healing

So, next time you encounter a wound, put a light on it!!

Let your cut heal through LIGHT THERAPY!

References:

http://www.jofamericanscience.org/journals/am-sci/am0706/36_5769am0706_203_208.pdf

https://www.infrared-light-therapy.com/red-light-therapy-wound-healing/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25363448/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25654197/

https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1054-660X/24/8/083001

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4126803/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24155549/

Improving Mental Acuity with Light Therapy

It’s common knowledge that as we age, our normal brain function gets disrupted. We tend to find it harder to recall information, memorize names, and respond with reason. The decline of our mental acuity causes these commonplace mental problems. Contrary to popular belief, aging is not the sole culprit for mental deterioration. Many factors, such as aging, lifestyle changes, and environmental stress, contribute to the decline of mental acuity.

As cognitive decline progresses, significant mental changes can result in disorders such as dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, and Parkinson’s disease. While these can be common aspects of life, they aren’t inevitable. Many medical experts believe that there are many lifestyle changes that you can take to prevent the degradation of Mental Acuity.

What is Mental Acuity?

Mental acuity is known as the sharpness of the mind. It involves our cognitive ability to concentrate, process, understand, reason, and memorize. On the other hand, intelligence means the extent to which our brains absorb and process a specific amount of information at a given amount of time. Mental acuity is a natural and essential aspect of our brain health and is not a measure of how “smart” we are.

Mental acuity allows us to perform daily activities effectively and efficiently. When our cognitive ability functions well, we’re more capable of doing things without damage or conflict.

What are the symptoms of a Deteriorating Mental Acuity?

Some signs of a deteriorating cognitive ability may be subtle. However, when left untreated could progress over time to more serious mental disorders. According to the National Institute on Aging, 8 out of 10 people who experience amnestic mild cognitive impairment develop into having Alzheimer’s disease.

Here are some early symptoms of a deteriorating mental acuity:

  • Absent-mindedness and having trouble concentrating
  • Forgetfulness of specific details like names, dates, events, and facts
  • Inability to reason and make vital decisions
  • Difficulty in retrieving information
  • Memory loss
  • Difficulty in following simple instructions

How to Improve Mental Acuity

Prevention is better than cure when it comes to developing chronic brain disorders. Here’s how you can take your brain health into your own hands by observing these lifestyle habits:

  1. Ensure a well-balanced diet

Getting enough nutrition is the key to ensure mental sharpness. Making sure you eat a well-balanced diet can help your body supply enough nutrients to your brain. Omega 3 Fatty Acids are essential nutrients that help build and restore brain cells. The brain also needs antioxidants to prevent inflammation.

Excessive intake of toxins such as alcohol and drug can depreciate your mental ability. Experts agree that poor gut health also results in a weakened immune system. As a result, it weakens your body’s inflammatory response. A poor inflammatory response causes mental disorders such as schizophrenia and dementia.

  1. Have Enough Sleep

Irregular sleep patterns and sleep deprivation disrupt your body’s circadian rhythm that can lead to short-term mental problems as well as long-term chronic health problems.

Your body’s circadian rhythm is a natural body clock that controls your sleep-wake schedule as well as your digestive patterns. When you’re sleep-deprived, these rhythms get disturbed. As a result, you experience headaches, mood swings, and difficulty to focus and recall information. Aside from these unwanted effects, not having enough sleep also negatively impacts your overall brain health.

  1. Get Yourself Moving

Exercise isn’t just for physical and aesthetic purposes. It also affects brain function in multiple ways. When you exercise, your body pumps more oxygen into your brain through an increased heart rate. Exercise allows your body to release hormones that are vital in nourishing your brain cells. It also promotes growth factors in your brain to assist in the growth of neuronal connections.

A study at the University of Georgia shows that a 20-minute exercise daily can improve memory retention and information processing. Many experts agree that a sedentary lifestyle may accelerate your way into cognitive decline.

  1. Use Red Light Therapy

Red Light therapy is a more modern approach to non-invasive and low-risk medical treatments. It is a form of photobiomodulation that allows light to change human cells' physiology that causes a wide range of benefits such as biological balance and cellular energy.

Kaiyan Medical is one of the pioneers of Red light therapy that uses red wavelengths to deliver benefits to the skin and near-infrared lights to penetrate deeper within the skin’s surface. This dual technology allows for better absorption and effectiveness of the benefits of Red light therapy.

As near-infrared wavelengths penetrate the brain’s cellular system, it promotes energy production by stimulating the mitochondria. It also prevents stress by keeping away oxidative stress. Thus, it delivers multiple benefits such as better blood flow, faster cell regeneration, and improved healing.

A study shows that red light therapy has significantly improved brain function when given to patients with cognitive dysfunction. All these benefits are vital in promoting and maintaining a healthy mental acuity. Red light therapy delivers all these cellular benefits to promote better sleep quality and a more balanced circadian clock.

As you maintain these lifestyle changes, you can experience a more improved brain function and better brain health. Now you can defy all odds and allow your brain to perform at its peak by having a healthy lifestyle and a balanced body.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4043367/

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/324044#oily-fish

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12595152/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5403829/

https://www.healthline.com/health/mental-health/brain-exercises

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4870908/


Animal Wellness: Red Light Therapy for Dogs

Certified pup parents know pets could easily sense when we’re feeling sad, happy, scared, or sick. Our furry friends could probably read us better than we could read them. However, active pets are also prone to injuries, cuts, wounds, inflammation, and infections like human beings.

If you’re a pet owner, you’d always want to give your pets the best care possible to make sure they are healthy and happy at all times. Thankfully, medicine has innovated well enough to find more advanced treatments and maintenance tools for our canine friends. In recent years, pet owners and some veterinarians have been using safe, non-invasive, and high-tech treatments for pets and domestic animals such as Red-Light therapy.

What is Red Light Therapy?

Red light therapy has been utilized by the veterinary world to deliver similar benefits to pets, just like humans. Red light therapy is a non-invasive treatment and a form of photobiomodulation that alters animal cells' physiology.

Light therapy produces wavelengths of photons that the photoreceptors in the animal’s bodies can absorb. The light provides alteration to the animal cells that result in numerous benefits such as better blood circulation and natural cellular regeneration.

Multiple studies support the efficacy of red-light therapy to animals. A 2017 study shows how Red Light therapy promoted faster healing for dogs that underwent bone surgery. The findings were also complemented by another study that suggests near-infrared wavelengths promoted bone cell reproduction for dogs.

Red Light Treatment for Dogs?

When our pets sprain their ankles or cut their pads, their cells become damaged. As a result, their bodies need cell energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to repair damaged cells and tissues.

The photoreceptors in their body absorb red light. The light stimulates ATP production in the animal’s body that results in faster delivery of nutrients and better excretion of toxins. All of these processes are essential for the body’s healing.

Red Light also promotes better circulation as it stimulates Nitric Oxide production to help blood vessels remain flexible. Injured or damaged cells need proper blood flow for healing. Light therapy helps in the healing process by increasing blood flow to ensure enough nutrients and oxygen in the affected area.

Red light is beneficial for surface healing by helping tissues that are potent in hemoglobin. On the other hand, near-infrared light can work better on deeper wounds as it can pass through the animal’s body's deeper tissues.

Innovators like Kaiyan Medical uses the FDA-cleared Red Light Therapy pad that utilizes the combined technology of Red Light-emitting diodes that can penetrate the skin and infrared wavelengths that can heal muscles, ligaments, and tendons. Red light and near-infrared wavelengths are the ideal combination of surface and inner healing.

Aside from providing the cells with energy, the light also stimulates collagen production, which aids in repairing damaged tissues. Collagen is an essential protein that can help get rid of scars and wounds.

What are the conditions that can be addressed by Red Light Therapy?

Skin and Surface issues

  • Surface wounds
  • Hair loss
  • Eczema
  • Other Skin Conditions
  • Wounds and Cuts

Deeper surface issues

  • Arthritis
  • Soft tissue injuries
  • Ligament injuries
  • Post-surgery Inflammation
  • Pain, Inflammation, and Swelling
  • hip dysplasia
  • Tendon problems
  • Strains and sprains
  • Salivary gland problems

General Maintenance

  • Maintenance of healthy joints and Bones
  • Maintenance of healthy Cardiovascular system
  • Maintenance of healthy Digestive system
  • Healthy Vision
  • Prevention of anxiety

Light therapy can be your best therapeutic tool in boosting your pet’s overall wellbeing. As a general rule, light therapy is a safe and non-invasive option for treating minor issues and maintaining their overall health. However, if your pet is undergoing more severe health problems, it’s best to consult your veterinarian for a more conducive treatment plan. While red light therapy is not a panacea for all your dog’s health issues, it’s a low-risk and pain-free option to complement treatments and to promote overall wellness for your beloved pet.

References:

https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/islsm/13/1/13_1_73/_article/-char/ja/

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/vde.12170?deniedAccessCustomisedMessage=&userIsAuthenticated=false

https://www.thieme-connect.com/products/ejournals/abstract/10.3415/VCOT-15-12-0198

https://www.degruyter.com/view/journals/plm/1/2/article-p117.xml

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1053/jvet.1999.0292?deniedAccessCustomisedMessage=&userIsAuthenticated=false

How Does Red Light Therapy Relate with Ketogenic Diet?

Red light therapy is an easily accessible and affordable clinical device that boosts metabolism and increases ATP energy production. It is a non-invasive modulator of metabolism that delivers proper frequency, power, and luminance by shifting the mitochondria's function organically.

Ketogenic Diet and Red Light Therapy

A ketogenic diet involves the consumption of low-carb, high-fat meals. When practiced together with red light therapy, it can amplify your metabolic flexibility. It also helps cells burn more sugar and fat efficiently. Good levels of ATP energy production (empowered by mitochondria by converting oxygen and nutrients to ATP) can help prevent high-blood or low-blood pressure conditions. The process of creating ATP energy works best when our body and cells are well-balanced, reaching a state called homeostasis.

One thing to consider in following a diet plan is over-nutrition, which may lead to metabolic inflexibility. When over-feeding happens, the production of ATP energy may result in metabolic congestion. Red light therapy can help alleviate this metabolic congestion by focusing amplification of ATP energy levels. Insulin can mediate metabolic congestion by the fluidity between glucose, fatty acids, and amino acids. An important step for ATP energy production is forming the COX enzyme, which can aid metabolism by pairing oxygen neutralized into the water with high-energy electrons.

If the COX enzyme goes out of sync with electrons' flow, the high-energy electrons won’t effectively be neutralized into water. Red light can help regulate the healthy formation of the COX enzyme, efficiently oxidizing fat. The ketogenic diet triggers cells to insulin by stimulating ATP energy production by increasing metabolic flexibility, reducing carbon combustion, and helping clear metabolic congestion.

Significance to Healing

The chemical DHEA (dehydroepiandrosterone) plays numerous vital roles in health. It helps with the metabolism of cholesterol that produces hormones such as progesterone, estrogen, and testosterone. As we age, our levels of DHEA decreases, as well as the synthesis of such hormones. Low levels of progesterone can affect women in their peri-menopausal and post-menopausal stages. This is a function of the decline in mitochondria, which then affects ATP energy levels.

Low levels of DHEA may contribute to the insufficiency of adrenaline and estrogen dominance, which is common to middle-aged women at the peri-menopausal or post-menopausal stage. Women rely on the production of adrenaline and DHEA to keep their progesterone levels and prevent estrogen dominance.

Lower production of DHEA and progesterone can be an effect of elevated secretion of cortisol that is caused by acute/chronic stress. When high levels of stress reduce the adrenal glands' proper functions due to the decrease of synthesis of the adrenal cortex steroid hormones in the mitochondria, it results in adrenal insufficiency.

Based on health professionals' studies, when cortisol levels drop, it inhibits the synthesis and secretion of DHEA/progesterone, resulting in pathophysiological changes caused by stress. Enzyme activation and regulatory signaling can affect the fluidity dynamics between cortisol, DHEA, and other hormones such as progesterone, estrogen, and testosterone.

Red light therapy and ketogenic diet can mediate inflammatory stress and regulate the healthy production of DHEA.

Estrogen Levels

Estrogen is a master regulator of female metabolism. A youthful and regulatory expression of estrogen is the production of 17B-estradiol (E2). It modulates the menstrual cycle to ensure the healthy release of the corpus luteum, which secretes progesterone.

On the other hand, progesterone helps maintain a healthy uterus lining. When the expression of E2 is sufficient, progesterone secretion also increases. Having high progesterone levels means having lower estrogen and a lesser risk of getting diseases like breast, ovary, and colon cancer. E2 also contributes to potential partition fuel, orchestrating metabolic flexibility, and increasing energy levels that lead to optimal cerebral glucose metabolism.

The decline in the peripheral steroidogenesis of E2, progesterone, and testosterone is common as time goes by.

Testosterone Levels

A 12-week ketogenic diet may increase testosterone levels in men due to an increase in cholesterol and DHEA. Red light therapy also improves the mitochondrial synthesis of testosterone from DHEA.

For males, testosterone naturally converts to E2, but healthy testosterone levels stipulate a hormonal challenge to the synthesis of E2. An enlarged prostate can be caused by estrogen dominance when there is no testosterone/estrogen ratio balance. Having healthy testosterone levels may lead to a decline of estrogen dominance, as it is for progesterone in women.

Other Healing Benefits

Healthcare professionals strongly believe that red light therapy can be a powerful healing agent that may help prevent diabetic ulcers and lower chances of extremity amputations when practiced together with a ketogenic diet.

Diabetic ulcers usually result to lower limb amputations in the long-run. Studies show that diabetic foot ulcers and lower extremity amputations are increasing in number. In fact, having unhealed wounds can be alarming as the post-amputation survival rate for people with diabetes averages to only five years. Statistics show the urgent need to prevent, detect, and prove that treatments for lower limb ulcers should be highly considered. Red light therapy has been proven to increase the circulation of blood flow and healthier skin.

Innovation

Red light therapy and ketogenic diets are considered to be disruptive innovators in the healthcare system. Apart from the fact that red light therapy is non-invasive, such treatment shows great potential in helping lengthen the lifespan and improve people's overall health. Red light therapy also promotes a more affordable and accessible treatment that can be done in the comfort of your home.

Here at Kaiyan Medical, we offer red light therapy devices to help you achieve your health and aesthetic goals. To learn more about the brands and products we offer, please click here.

More References

https://perfectketo.com/red-light-therapy/

https://perfectketo.com/keto-diet-plan-for-beginners/

https://www.rejuvcryo.com/the-science/2019/8/14/article-the-surprising-synergy-between-keto-and-red-light-therapy-rejuvcryo-north-county-san-diego

The Benefits of Red Light Therapy in Treating Hypothyroidism

Thyroid issues are a commonplace problem that affects all ages and genders. It significantly contributes to changes in mental outlook, energy levels, skin, and weight. Hypothyroidism has drawn much attention due to many cases that are left undiagnosed, untreated, or inadequately treated. As a result, it led to more serious problems such as infertility, heart disease, neurological problems, and high cholesterol and blood pressure levels. Not to mention, treatment studies for hypothyroidism have experienced a significant backlog throughout the years.

In this article, we take a look at the basic precepts of hypothyroidism and how Red light therapy plays a role in treating the thyroid problem.

What is Hypothyroidism?

Hypothyroidism is a chronic abnormality of the thyroid gland, demonstrating an inadequacy of thyroid hormones such as triiodothyronine and thyroxine (T4). Normal levels of thyroid hormones stimulate a healthy amount of mitochondrial energy production. This means that in hypothyroid cases, the thyroid inhibits a state of low cellular energy.

As a result, people who suffer from this chronic problem often feel unusual fatigue, tiredness, weight changes, and skin problems. However, symptoms can vary from person to person and may even be subtle enough to be left undiagnosed and untreated. When left untreated, the disease causes more irreversible neurological, reproductive, and cardiovascular problems. It’s also found that Hypothyroidism is found to be five to eight times more prevalent in women than in men.

What Causes Hypothyroidism?

Hypothyroidism can be caused by a wide range of diet and lifestyle issues. Some cases can be caused by a lack of iodine intake, especially in more underdeveloped parts of the world. It can also be caused by other dietary issues such as low carb intake, excess polyunsaturated fat intake, and alcoholism. Other typical causes include stress, aging, sleep deprivation, and heredity.

What is Light Therapy?

When talking about light, we often think of it as the first thing we switch on in a dark room or the bright rays that set up the mood. We don’t usually think of it as having bioactive properties, penetrating beneath our skin, affecting the way our hormones, tissues, and cells function.

In reality, our cells actually capture photons of light, just like how plants do. Light therapy, also called photobiomodulation, essentially means light (photo) changing (modulation) your biology (bio).

How Can Red Light Therapy Help Treat Hypothyroidism?

Red and near-infrared light therapy, backed by over 5,000 studies, has grown its significance in medicinal treatments throughout the years.

Red light therapy is significantly targeted for hypothyroidism because unlike other kinds of light; they have a greater penetrability beneath our skin.

In fact, a 2010 study found that 38% of patients with Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism who were given red light therapy treatments have reduced their medication dose, while 17% have been able to stop the medication completely.

Here’s how it works:

  1. It Supplies energy

Because hypothyroidism is reflective of low cellular energy in the thyroid, red and near-infrared light helps the cells work better by supplying more energy to your body.

They have a photoreceptor called cytochrome c oxidase that works by catching photos of light. Like how our food is being processed by our body for the mitochondria to stimulate energy, the photos of light also stimulate energy production in the mitochondria. The mitochondria are responsible for the energy production of our body’s cells.

  1. It Prevents Stress

Red light is also shown to prevent stress by averting nitrous oxide poisoning. This means that aside from helping the mitochondria supply more energy, red light helps the thyroid hormone by alleviating stress-related molecules' effects.

  1. It Breaks the Cycle

Hypothyroidism is a vicious cycle of having low energy availability and decreased thyroid hormone production. By stimulating energy production in the mitochondria and preventing nitrous oxide poisoning prevention, red light can potentially break the cycle responsible for hypothyroidism.

In Kaiyan Medical, we produce a medical-grade red light therapy device that is effective and non-invasive, ideal for supplementing hypothyroidism treatments. Our device has a dual optical energy technology that combines red light and infrared light therapy as an excellent spectrum for deeper penetration and absorption. You can now rise above hypothyroidism and maximize your body’s healing properties with our Red Light therapy device.

More References

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6247385/

https://drruscio.com/red-light-therapy-part-ii/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6822815/

https://www.health.harvard.edu/newsletter_article/treating-hypothyroidism


Speeding up Recovery for Athletes: Red Light Therapy Treatment

Athletes take exercise and training very seriously to maximize and improve performance. Whether you’re a competitive elite athlete or someone who’s just born to win every day, recovery can be one of the most neglected aspects of our daily lives.

Recovery: We hear it all the time from coaches and instructors, but it’s also one of the hardest things to do. The saying “Push yourself to your limits” happens also to have its own limits. Neglecting your training recovery aspect for optimal performance can take a toll on our body in the long run.

In this article, we show the importance of rest and recovery and some of the ways to speed up our body’s healing process, such as integrating red light therapy treatment.

What is Recovery?

After training or a strenuous workout, our body responds to strain, injury, or stress as a defense mechanism in inflammation. While it may sound damaging, inflammation is a natural response when our muscle tissue regenerates and grows from microtears. Going through the process is important to allow muscle growth and performance improvement. However, the inflammation needs recovery for your muscles to heal from too much strain or injury for it to maximize its healing effects.

Recovery is the process that your body undergoes to recuperate between training sessions or from the time of danger to its healing progression. Recovery works by giving your body time to regenerate muscle tissues.

Whether it’s a strain, acute soreness, or severe damage, your body needs time to heal. The time needed for the recovery process is also dependent on the severity of the damage/strain/injury. This means that the greater the stressor's intensity to your body, the longer the time you need to spend to allow your body to recover.

What are the Examples of Recovery?
  • Getting enough sleep
  • Resting
  • Cooling down
Why is Recovery Time Important?

Many athletes have made recovery time a priority as it assists in the healing process of muscles post-inflammation. Giving your body time to recover can result in an improved performance.

During the recovery time, the muscle repairs regenerate and strengthens to tolerate a higher level of strain the next time. In other words, taking time to heal makes you stronger and less susceptible to future injuries. Having enough recovery time helps in optimal performance and longevity by helping the athletes convalesce both psychologically and physically to train and perform better.

By doing this, you can prevent future chronic problems, decreased sports performance, increased risk of injuries, or fatigue caused by inadequate healing.

What are the Ways to Speed Recovery?

1. Plan Your Rest Time

Planning your rest schedule and duration involves many factors such as the intensity of your activity, your age, and your skill level in sports/pieces of training. You may need less time to recover or more, depending on your personal needs. As a general rule, for medium to intense workouts/training, it is prescribed to maintain a healthy duration of 45 hours in between training.

Pro tip: Engage in Active Recovery

If you’re not suffering from an injury or severe damage, it’s important to incorporate active recovery periods during your recovery time so your body can maintain its active state.

Proper blood circulation is important in the recovery process. When the body gets injured, the body responds by dilating blood cells to speed up blood flow. Active recovery helps maintain good blood circulation and removes lactic acid out of inflamed muscles. Active recovery activities involve light physical movements such as stretching or yoga to allow proper blood flow and help your muscles recover and adapt better.

2. Get Enough Sleep

The Human Growth Hormone (HGH) is at its peak at night as we sleep. This hormone is responsible for tissue repair and recovery. This is why the key to a speedy recovery is to make you get a good REM sleep at the right time during your recovery period. Make sure to get a minimum of 7 hours of sleep at night to ensure that your body gets enough rest that it needs and to avoid any future complications. Lack of sleep can deter the process of muscle recovery.

Pro tip: Don’t be scared of having a few extra hours

Especially when you are suffering from intense strain/injury, it’s important to sneak in a few extra hours of sleep within your recovery period. In fact, a 2018 study suggests that sleep extension, a form of sleep intervention, can significantly contribute to the success of an athlete’s recovery. One way to ensure you get a significant amount of rest is to make sure your body has a healthy circadian rhythm. If you’re worried that you’re having trouble sleeping at night, there are many ways to improve your circadian clock- including red light therapy.

3. Refuel your Body

A healthy diet is also one of the great pillars of health. The nutrients you take in play a great role in your body’s function to cooperate with the recovery process. Minimize processed foods that may contain too much salt, sweets, and alcohol. These types of food may promote inflammation and dehydration, which can hinder the recovery process. Make sure to eat a balance recommended diet of whole foods.

Have an evaluation with a licensed dietitian or nutritionist to assess your nutritional needs. Assessment may vary depending on different factors such as weight, BMI, and activity level.

Pro tip: Focus on your Protein Intake

Protein is the key macronutrient that is responsible for muscle building and repair. It has amino acids that are metabolized by your body to ease muscle inflammation and build stronger muscles. Skip gulping on those protein supplements and focus instead on taking protein from whole foods such as lean meat, eggs, and cheese.

4. Listen to your Body

There can be all kinds of rules in recovery to maximize healing, but you can’t go wrong with paying attention to your body’s signals. Often, your body’s responses can be neglected. However, overlooking these signals can result in overtraining, which puts your body at risk of having more problems in the long run.

Despite your recovery time or period, if your body signals indicate pain and soreness, it’s important to give it time to recover better to address the issue. Aside from obvious physiological signs, pay attention to your heart rate variability, indicating your body’s adaptability to stress and your overall cardiovascular fitness.

5. Incorporate Red Light Therapy

Thanks to innovative medical devices, athletes and trainers have utilized more advanced healing modalities like red light therapy. Red Light Therapy is a popular, non-invasive, and effective light therapy treatment that can improve blood circulation essential for tissue and muscle recovery. It works by using LED to deliver wavelengths that deeply penetrates the skin and cells.

Integrating red light therapy in your recovery process can speed up muscle repair and minimize pain and swelling. The therapy accelerates the healing process by enhancing macrophage activity responsible for the white blood cell’s healing and anti-inflammatory response.

Pro tip: Try using Light Therapy Body Pad

Kaiyan Medical’s Light Therapy Body pad utilizes a high-end, medical-grade dual optical energy pad that uses 30 pieces of red light and 30 pieces of infrared light. The therapy's duality promotes deep treatment by treating injured skin surface while repairing deeper muscle, bones, tissue, and joint damage. The therapy pad is specially made with a broader light spectrum to increase absorption and penetration so you can maximize the treatment’s benefits. It’s a safe, non-invasive treatment that you can add to your recovery process so you can get back in the game stronger than ever.

Recovery and Rest are just as important as optimizing and improving performance. Allowing your body to maximize its natural healing processes can improve performance and overall better physical and mental health.

More References

Ratamess NA, Alvar BA, Kibler WB, Kraemer WJ, Triplett NT. American College of Sports Medicine position stand. Progression models in resistance training for healthy adults. Med Sci Sports Exerc 2009.

Garber CE, Blissmer B, Deschenes MR et al. American College of Sports Medicine position stand. Quantity and quality of exercise for developing and maintaining cardiorespiratory, musculoskeletal, and neuromotor fitness in apparently healthy adults: guidance for prescribing exercise. Med Sci Sports Exerc 2011.

Michael Kellmann, Maurizio Bertollo, et al. Recovery and Performance in Sport: Consensus Statement. Int J Sports Physiol Perform. 2018 Feb 1.

So-Ichiro Fukada, Takayuki Akimoto, Athanasia Sotiropoulos. Role of damage and management in muscle hypertrophy: Different muscle stem cells' behaviors in regeneration and hypertrophy. Biochim Biophys Acta Mol Cell Res. 2020 Sep.

Daniel J Plews, Paul B Laursen, et al. Training adaptation and heart rate variability in elite endurance athletes: opening the door to effective monitoring. Sports Med. 2013 Sep.

Michael R. Irwin, Richard Olmstead, Judith E. Carroll. Sleep Disturbance, Sleep Duration, and Inflammation: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies and Experimental Sleep Deprivation. Biol Psychiatry. 2016 Jul 1; 80(1): 40–52.

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/247927

https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/heart-rate-variability-new-way-track-well-2017112212789

https://www.webmd.com/men/features/benefits-protein#1

How Saunas and Red Light Therapy are Distinct but Complementing

Saunas and red light therapy devices are clinically-proven treatments that complement each other wonderfully, even if they depend on distinct biological mechanisms to yield various natural health and aesthetic benefits.

In this article, we’ll focus on how things work for red light therapy and the distinctions of traditional saunas, and what you can actually gain by availing of either of them.

What You Need to Know About Saunas

Saunas can make your body’s core temperature hotter by supplying sufficient heat throughout your body. It has been a part of traditional medicine for various centuries, as the old century folks realized the health benefits of sweating. Although there are multiple types of saunas, two of them are the most popular:

  1. Traditional Convection Saunas

When you think of saunas, this is the first scenario that comes to mind: hot and steamy. This type of sauna requires more energy as it delivers heat to the atmosphere, warming the air inside the sauna, and distributes heat in the body. Traditional convection saunas can maintain air temperatures between 170–200°F and are an ideal type of sauna for general use. It is important to comprehend the different temperatures required for specific health concerns since being exposed to heat more than what has required triggers a warning for unsubstantiated claims.

  1. Infrared Saunas

The latest trend in saunas is the infrared saunas. Inside, instead of warming the air, this kind of sauna heats actual objects. Such objects include those with emitting surfaces, charcoal, and carbon fiber. Infrared saunas' effectivity is directly attributed to the temperature, humidity, and length of time your body is exposed to heat, even though many saunas claim to provide “full-spectrum” infrared wavelengths.

The farther the wavelengths are in the infrared spectrum, the more they are considered efficient and effective in heat production. This will be thoroughly discussed later, but the general gist is that heat supplementation is the primary purpose of saunas, convection, and infrared.

On the other hand, near-infrared wavelengths in near-infrared saunas generate very little heat. Most of the high-quality standard saunas use more effective heats from the far-infrared spectrum or IR-C wavelengths.

What are the Health Benefits of Saunas?

Inducing thermal stress on the body is the primary function of every sauna, but what does it really mean?

One of many biological responses from sauna usage is increased heart rate as well as perspiration. The essential body processes protein metabolism and is also affected by enough heat. Heat shock proteins are a special kind of protein that responds specifically to cellular stress from heat. Heat stress induction leads to natural health benefits like those we gain doing physical activities.

One experiment had participants sat in a sauna treatment for 30 minutes at 194°F for 3 weeks, totaling 13 work sessions. The results showed that the participants improved 32% in performance tests versus those who underwent sauna treatments.

Besides improving your cardiovascular functions, using saunas can help reap benefits such as detoxication, decreased depression, and lesser chronic fatigue.

Red Light Therapy vs. Saunas

What differentiates saunas from red light therapy devices is their mechanism of action. While saunas utilize heat for biological effects, red light therapy devices supply healthy light wavelengths directly to the skin and cells. Even when producing almost no heat, red light therapy devices help with cellular function improvement and support bodily balance. Simply put, red light therapy helps energize the body with light, while saunas heat your body.

How does red light therapy work?

Mitochondria, the powerhouse of our cells, is wonderfully affected by certain wavelengths of natural light. This helps in producing energy within the cells of our body, feeding photons to our cells from natural light via red light therapy.

What about clinically-proven wavelengths?

We feel warm when exposed to sunlight and other heat sources such as fire and hot coals because most of the wavelengths, including ultraviolet (UV), are rapidly absorbed by the outer layers of the skin tissue as heat.

However, unknown to many, some wavelengths have the unique capability of boosting your cellular functions and energy. These are those few wavelengths that can penetrate human tissues more effectively, having photons power-up your “cellular batteries.”

What to Look for When Buying Red Light Therapy Devices and Saunas?

One of the first few things you need to look for in saunas is the temperature it produces. You need to consider some other factors, including the type of wood, the heating unit (Is it conventional or infrared? Is it near far or full-spectrum?), finishes and stains, price, and more.

On the other hand, some of the factors you need to consider when choosing a red light therapy device are the device’s light energy output, light color or frequency range in terms of nanometers, warranty, body or treatment coverage area, the price, and the credibility of the company provider.

Light Therapy and Saunas: Friends with Benefits

Saunas and red light therapy devices offer a wide range of natural health benefits, which surprisingly go well with each other. They both support balance and health to improve your fitness and function but do not overlap with each other’s effects because of energy supplementation in distinct forms and wavelengths. What a great combination of complementary natural therapies!

Here at Kaiyan Medical, we provide different types of red light therapy devices for various medical, wellness, and aesthetic uses. To see our list of products, click here.

References:

https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/saunas-and-your-health

https://www.healthline.com/health/fitness-exercise/are-saunas-good-for-you

Scoon GS, Hopkins WG, Mayhew S, Cotter JD. Effect of post-exercise sauna bathing on the endurance performance of competitive male runners. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport. 2007 Aug.

Crinnion WJ. Sauna as a valuable clinical tool for cardiovascular, autoimmune, toxicant- induced and other chronic health problems. Altern Med Rev. 2011 Sep.



Let’s Talk About Optimal Performance Recovery and Red Light Therapy

Performance and recovery go hand in hand when training or doing physical activities, regardless if you’re an athlete or not. In fact, athletes and their trainers utilize light therapy to improve their performance and muscle health and optimize recovery. To expound further, this article will tackle optimizing performance in fitness, improving the recovery process, and breaking down the significance of light therapy.

Optimizing Performance and Improving Recovery

Optimizing performance means paying attention to the body and how it functions, to live and train the body, and to find the best way to support its functions. Performance is not based on how hard or heavy are the weights you lift or the number of kilometers you’ve run; it is how effective your performance is and how you match it with your lifestyle (with the way you eat, drink and sleep).

On the other hand, recovery is about the effectiveness of the body’s healing process and the conscious effort of being in your best shape by enhancing your workout. It is also about utilizing the body’s tools and functions to effectively finish the jobs required daily.

Physical Performance and Recovery

Performance and recovery are correlated to one another. In exercising or training, if you want to improve fitness, workouts should be consistent. To get stronger, faster, and bigger, certain efforts must be made to increase performance levels. The recovery process is essential in health. It contributes to the workout; it is the downtime between training sessions or a break due to an injury or a period of healing from any exhaustion experienced.

Breaks like cool-downs, rest, and ample time of sleep give your body time to recuperate. They also allow healing for the muscles and tissues affected, strained, or damaged from workouts or training.

Performance is better when recovery time from soreness or inflammation is maximized. It also helps prevent burnout, fatigue, and possible injuries. If recovery is not made right, your physical performance may not reach its optimal state. Some athletes and trainers even make a recovery a priority over training itself. They believe that when an athlete recovers better than their competition, they will train harder in the long run.

Recovery is for Everyone

Even if you are not an athlete, you should know how to let your body rest, heal, and recover properly from any form of injury or physical activity. Everyone has their own activity levels to maintain. It may not be sports-related, but everyone demands effort from their bodies on a day-to-day basis.

When Recovery is Not Prioritized…

Regardless if you are an athlete, your body has limits. And if you push too hard, the body can break down and perform worse, especially if you didn’t observe any recovery time. Overtraining and pushing the body beyond its limits can affect performance in the short term or long term. Chances of injury are higher when you don’t allow yourself to recover, and it may also affect hormonal levels and the function of the immune system. The body needs time to process inflammation or any injury.

Inflammation and the Importance of Recovery

Inflammation happens when the body responses to danger or strain. It often takes place during a strenuous workout. When exercising, inflammation may indicate muscular damage. And when a muscle is “damaged,” it means that the tissue is growing and undergoes repair to get stronger.

Experiencing inflammation is a normal part of the growth and repair of muscle tissues. However, if you won’t set aside time for recovery, your inflammation may worsen over time and lead to greater health consequences.

4 Easy Ways to Improve the Recovery Process

Here are some ways that can help you improve your body’s recovery process:

  1. Body awareness

The body speaks when it sends signals to the brain. Sometimes, we dismiss these signals because of training goals. This may eventually lead to fatigue and injury. When you experience pain or when your muscles are sore, it is important to give your body time to recuperate. You must also be aware of your heart rate, especially at rest, as it may be saying something about the state of your health.

  1. Getting enough sleep

Besides giving your body time to recuperate, deep sleep also allows the body to digest and process fat and recover from inflammation or damaged muscle tissues. It is harder for the body to recover from pain, strain, fatigue, and injury when you’re sleeping less than 7–8 hours per night. If you’re struggling with getting enough sleep, try doing meditation or speak with a doctor so he/she can advise you about developing a sleeping routine.

  1. Eating a balanced diet.

Getting the right amount of whole foods, good carbohydrates, protein, and good fat can also boost your performance and recovery. Lowering your intake of processed foods, alcohol, and sugary drinks can also help decrease inflammation.

  1. Aiming for balanced and healthy cells

The performance and recovery of our bodies depend entirely on our cells. When our cells are creating and using energy efficiently, our bodies recover faster. ATP (adenosine triphosphate) energy is released to give us power in what we do. The process of creating ATP energy works best when our body and cells are well-balanced, reaching a state called homeostasis.

Light Therapy, Performance, Healing, and Recovery

High-quality devices are now available in the market to help athletes and trainers enhance the body’s natural healing and recovery process through light therapy.

Light therapy is a non-invasive treatment that uses LED lights to deliver red and near-infrared light to the skin and cells. It promotes efficient cellular ATP energy production and helps restore the balance of cells and tissues. Light therapy can be done before or after a workout. Some even do it both times — before and after a workout, depending on their goals.

Pre-conditioning with light therapy before working out can also help strengthen muscle performance. It can limit muscle damage and strain, lessening the chances of inflammation or soreness. When used after a workout, it promotes the speedy recovery of muscles and accelerates its adaptability to exercise. It also helps the body process acute inflammation after physical activity.

The Relationship Between Light Therapy and Muscle Cells

Muscles are composed of millions of cells that need to release ATP energy to fulfill the body's jobs, balancing exercise and stress. Light therapy helps improve cellular ATP energy, glycogen synthesis, oxidative stress reduction, and protection against muscle damage from exercising. Light therapy also helps improve blood circulation and oxygen availability, which allows better healing and recovery. It helps with the overall improvement of physical performance and faster recovery times. It also helps limit fatigue from exercising and strength training.

Recover and Improve Your Performance with Light Therapy

As discussed, light therapy promotes faster healing and recovery and soothes cells under stress when doing strenuous workouts, incurring injuries, and experiencing inflammation. When you set aside time for recovery, you give your body and cells what they need to function, thus improving your overall performance.

At Kaiyan Medical, we offer high-quality light therapy devices to help you achieve and maintain your fitness and performance goals. If you have questions about our products and the brands we offer, please don’t hesitate to contact us. We will respond to you as soon as possible.

Red Light Therapy For Hair Loss

If you’re one of the 35 million men or 21 million women in the United States who are losing their hair, you know how hard it can be to slow down getting bald. Creams, pills, and other treatments are often touted as solutions, but even if they do work, they come with side effects. Meanwhile, hair loss takes a tremendous mental toll. Among the most common effects are diminished self-esteem and confidence, as you notice others wearing hairstyles you couldn’t possibly pull off. And while some people rock the bald look, it’s not for every guy suffering from male pattern baldness and it’s rarely an option for women.

If this sounds like you, red light therapy is worth a look. Red light therapy for hair loss is backed by research, is completely natural, and can slow–or in some cases, reverse–hair loss without disruptive side effects. If you’re curious how this is possible, what the most relevant studies say, and–more importantly–if it will work, this article is for you. From cellular growth to the proper how-to steps, read on to uncover how red light can help you get your hair back.

Why Do We Lose Hair?

According to the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery, almost half of men show noticeable hair loss by reading middle age. Surprisingly, the numbers are even higher among women: by the age of 60, nearly 80 percent of women show noticeable hair loss.

So, why do we lose hair? Briefly, losing hair helps us making room for new growth. A typical human will have up to 100,000 hairs on their head, and it’s only normal to lose 50–100 every day. After that, that causes get more complicated.

A few of the most common causes include:

Genetics

The most common cause of hair loss is hereditary hair loss or androgenetic alopecia. Male pattern baldness is characterized by M-shaped hair loss that begins at the temples and a bald spot in the back. It can begin as early as puberty or later in life. Female pattern baldness generally manifests as thinning on the head's top and crown, widening the center part but not affecting the front hairline.

Stress

Both acute and chronic stress contribute to hair loss in men and women. In acute stress, hair loss is often tied to a specific cause such as a sudden loss of a loved one, an accident, illness, or surgery; this hair loss may be temporary. Chronic stress, including job stress, relationship stress, and financial stress, also appears to accelerate hair loss.

Poor Nutrition

Specifically, inadequate protein intake affects hair follicles and contributes to hair loss. While over 40 million Americans are malnourished due to poverty, easy accessibility of junk food means that while many Americans get enough calories in their diets, they do not necessarily get the nutrition they need.

Red Light Therapy for Hair Loss


Given the side effects, cost, limited success, and ongoing hassles of these common hair restoration treatments, it makes sense to look at an alternative that is painless, non-invasive, has no side effects, and can actually enhance your health in a variety of different ways at the same time. Red light therapy is that option. Also red light therapy can help improve various other conditions, including joint pain from arthritis, sun damage, and nerve damage, to name a few. In fact, it can even treat one of the root causes of hair loss: thyroid problems.

What Is Red Light Therapy?


Red light therapy is a phototherapy that uses specific wavelengths of light to reduce inflammation, accelerate healing, and promote a healthy skin tone. Red light is part of the visible light spectrum (not to be confused with infrared light or ultraviolet light, invisible to the human eye) and is bioactive in humans. This means that our bodies respond to it beneficially in much the same way that plants respond to sunlight: by creating more energy at the cellular level.

Red light (also called low-level light therapy or LLLT) for hair loss was discovered somewhat by accident in the 1960s when mice were given chemotherapy. The chemotherapy-induced hair loss, but when the mice were irradiated with red light, the fur grew back thicker than before. Modern red light therapy works similarly, using high-power LEDs to saturate your body with wavelengths of therapeutic light. It typically uses visible light in various colors, but the red and infrared ranges are best for a wide variety of conditions, including hair loss. While sunlight provides a complete spectrum of wavelengths (including red light), it also contains harmful UVA and UVB wavelengths. Using the red light frequency alone has no side effects, such as burning or skin damage.


How Red Light Therapy Restores Hair


Red light is especially effective at treating hair loss; specifically, light in the 620nm (nanometer) to 660nm wavelengths work best. It works by increasing blood flow in the scalp; this stimulates the metabolism in hair follicles, resulting in more hair production.

You lose hair during hair loss but not the follicles–the tube-like formations that anchor hair to the skin. At the base of each follicle is the hair bulb (the whole thing looks somewhat like a tall vase). At the bulbous part of the vase are the papilla and the matrix; this is where hair begins to grow. We see as “hair” mostly a protein called keratin that makes up the hair shaft. When the hair follicles and the papilla and matrix cells are not functioning properly, they cannot support hair growth,, causing it to slow or cease altogether.

Red light penetrates the skin to the base of the hair follicles, stimulating the cells, papilla,, and matrix to produce more energy, which results in these cells replicating more successfully. This replication leads to new hair growth from these previously-dormant follicles. Red light also:

Stimulates Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) production, a coenzyme responsible for fueling cellular structures. Increases in ATP cause individual cells within the hair follicle to increase their activity, including the rate at which they replicate. Restoring the energy of the hair follicles' cellular structures means the papilla creates more keratin, which results in hair growth.

Increases collagen production. Hair is primarily made up of a protein called keratin. While collagen — another type of protein — isn’t present in hair, it acts as an antioxidant to fight damage caused by free radicals (compounds that develop in the body during stress, environmental pollutants, poor nutrition, etc.). Free radicals damage hair follicles, which contributes to their inability to grow hair. Increased collagen means less oxidative damage, which can lead to increased hair growth.

Increases the creation of new capillaries, which improves blood flow to the scalp and brings oxygen and nutrients to hair follicles,, and removes waste that can lead to hair follicle damage. One study linked improved blood flow to the growth of thicker, healthier hair. Barbers have long encouraged men to massage their scalps to increase blood flow, but increasing blood flow using red light is generally more effective.

Cases Where Red Light Does NOT Work

It’s important to note that while red light therapy is effective for many types of hair loss (especially alopecia or temporary hair loss due to hormonal imbalances or illness), it’s not effective 100% of the time. For example, hair loss due to chemotherapy will continue until the treatment is stopped. The same applies to hair loss due to the side effects of other medications. Also, any hair follicles that have been destroyed due to injury, surgery, burns, or other permanent injuries will not grow back. And remember, please see your doctor if you experience sudden or dramatic hair loss, which can signal a serious underlying condition. Red and Near-Infrared Light: a Potent Combination

More References

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30843235/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29957664/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29797431/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28328705/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25124964/

The Effect of Green & Red Light Therapy on Hearing

Low-level laser therapy

Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been practiced for over 20 years in Europe and has been introduced in the United States as a treatment for pain and postsurgical tissue repair. It has been proposed that laser energy in the red and near-infrared light spectrum may aid in the repair of tissue damage. A proposed mechanism for this therapeutic effect is the stimulation of mitochondria in the cells to produce more energy through the production of adenosine triphosphate.

Studies in humans have investigated the effects of LLLT on both hearing loss and tinnitus, with equivocal results. Some studies have found an improvement in hearing thresholds and tinnitus symptoms.

The Subjects

A total of 35 adult subjects were enrolled in the study. Two subjects withdrew from the study due to loss of interest and/or scheduling difficulty. The data from three additional subjects were not included in the analysis. One subject yielded unreliable audiometric and speech understanding data, speech scores could not be obtained from one subject with a profound hearing loss, and calibration problems compromised data from the third subject. Data from the remaining 30 subjects were included in the analyses. The experimental protocol was approved by the Institutional Review Board of The University of Iowa, and written informed consent was obtained from all participants.

The Device

An Erchonia EHL laser was used to provide the laser stimulation. The device was a portable unit that consisted of a hand-held probe and a main body. The probe contained two laser diodes. One diode produced light in the green part of the visible light spectrum (532 nm wavelength), and the other diode produced light in the red part of the visible light spectrum (635 nm wavelength). Both diodes produced energy levels of 7.5 mW (class IIIb). The laser beams from both diodes were dispersed through lenses to create parallel line-generated beams, rather than spots. A second Erchonia EHL device served as the placebo. It was identical to the treatment device, except that the laser diodes were replaced with nonfunctioning standard light-emitting diodes.

The Groups

The study used three groups: treatment, placebo, and control. Subjects were pseudorandomly assigned to one of the three groups.

Initial group assignment was random with occasional adjustment to ensure that the three groups were similar in terms of number of participants, female/male ratio, mean age of participants, and mean pure-tone audiometric thresholds. The treatment group received the laser treatment protocol using the functional laser device. The placebo group also received the laser treatment protocol, but using the nonfunctioning laser device. The control group made similarly timed visits to the laboratory but received no real or feigned “treatment.” The study used a repeated-measures design, with each subject taking a battery of pretests, followed by treatment followed by a battery of posttests.

Analysis

Data were obtained from both ears of each subject. Since no obvious differences were seen between left and right ears, data from both ears were combined in the following analyses. Strictly speaking, this likely violates the statistical assumption of independent sampling, since the test results from left and right ears of a single subject are likely to be highly correlated. None of the statistical tests used in the analyses are robust to the assumption of independent sampling, and the effect of including both ears is likely to be that of artificially increasing the sample size, making it more likely that a statistically significant result will be found. All statistical tests were conducted using a significance level of .

Conclusions

No statistically significant effect of LLLT on auditory function was found, as assessed by pure-tone audiometry, speech understanding, and TEOAEs in this test. Additionally, no individual subjects showed any clinically significant change. It remains possible that other methods of LLLT could have an effect on hearing. The type of device used was not the best one for this type of study. Further research elucidating the anatomic and physiologic bases for therapeutic effects of LLLT on hearing are needed before further clinical testing is warranted.

More References

Clinical Study | Open Access. Volume 2013 |Article ID 916370 | https://doi.org/10.1155/2013/916370

ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01820416)

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The Brain in Our Skin

Dr. Claudia Aguirre which has a Ph.D. in neuroscience from USC and travels the world lecturing on a broad range of topics from neuroscience to skin care has been researching the power of the skin and its connection with the brain.

The skin is highly innervated and intricately connected to the brain and central nervous system, just as other sensory organs are. Dr. Claudia Aguirre is discovering that the skin has a lot of neuro potential, or neuroplasticity, that has gone unrecognized. For example, just as our eyes have receptors that transduce light photons into signals to the brain that we process as vision, we’re discovering that our skin also has light receptors. Although we don’t yet know how they work, we speculate that they might be signaling the brain to make systemic changes that affect the full nervous system. Similarly, olfactory receptors in the hair follicles, just as we do in the nose.

Examples

Another example is touch, for which our skin is the primary sense organ. Skin is also our largest organ, which gives us a clue as to how important touch is. Different receptors in the skin can tell us not only whether what we touch is hot or cold, rough or smooth. Skin can even sense the intention behind the touch. A gentle touch feels much different than an aggressive one. We can tell whether the person giving us a massage is paying attention or whether they’re distracted. Moreover, different kinds of touch elicit different biochemical and hormonal responses, which have systemic results. A hug or kiss stimulates the release of oxytocin, the bonding hormone, through the bloodstream, while a punch or shove will release adrenaline and cortisol. All of these capabilities are what we say by the hidden brain in the skin.

Nervous System

The skin is connected to the nervous system; it’s connected to the endocrine system. The skin is impacted by our emotional states and, conversely, our skin can impact how we feel about ourselves. Cultural stress and anxiety can trigger or aggravate many skin conditions—from acne to eczema to herpes, psoriasis, and rosacea. Conversely, a disfiguring skin condition can trigger stress, anxiety, depression, and even suicide. Chronic, generalized anxiety can create chronic inflammation and exacerbate inflammatory skin conditions, such as the ones mentioned previously. Chronic stress can result in chronic anxiety, hypervigilance, poor sleep, and a whole cascade of effects resulting in a constant breakdown of tissues and organs, including the skin. There’s a whole new field of medicine being developed called psychodermatology, which is the study and treatment of the psychological component of skin conditions. Better understanding of the neuropotential of skin also opens the possibility of whole new avenues of treatment with light therapy for many of our chronic conditions.

In Kaiyan Medical we have understood that neuroscience should absolutely be part of the conversation about skincare and beauty because the brain and the skin are intimately connected. Skincare is important not only for the skin, but also the brain. That's why we keep developing light therapy devices for skin and brain. In Kaiyan we always recommend to listen for all the little signs that your skin tells you that you tend to ignore. You get a rash, and you brush it off: “Maybe it’s just dry out. Maybe I need to switch creams.” But if it occurs repeatedly, you need to look more closely and ask, “What could my skin be trying to tell me?” Are you repressing emotions? Is there a relationship issue you’re avoiding? Is there some other life circumstance that’s “gotten under your skin”? The body has a wisdom we should listen to.

References

https://drhowardmurad.com/the-brain-in-our-skin-an-interview-with-dr-claudia-aguirre/

http://doctorclaudia.com/about

https://www.janinerod.com/the-hidden-brain-in-your-skin-claudia-aguirre-tedxucla/

Healing Muscular Pain with Light Therapy

Light Therapy Healing Muscular Pain

When it comes to pain, we could hardly avert it! Especially the muscle pain. Given that the human body has over 600 muscles, it is tough to avoid muscle pain. Evidently, one out of three Americans is affected by muscle pain annually.

Not only this, Musculoskeletal pain affects around 116 million Americans, which results in poor productivity, missed work or school, fatigue, and lost interest in work.

But doesn’t we treatments for this chronic pain? Of course, we do have several options. Currently, therapies available consist of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, steroid injections, pain medications, and surgery. Each of these has its own specific risk profiles.

What we need now is an effective solution that is less time-consuming, low risk, safe and non-invasive, and yet cost-effective. All these features are available in treatment; we call Low Laser Light Therapy (LLLT). Light therapy has been in the medical field over the past forty years. Light therapy has been demonstrated to lessen inflammation and edema, promote healing in a range of musculoskeletal pathologies. LLLT is being accepted around the globe. This is an advanced, cost-effective, non-invasive therapy for pain that could elevate the quality of life while reducing your financial strains. The causes of muscular pain are numerous. Hence, LLLT helps people from all fields like sports, fitness, medical, and even old age.


Mechanism of LLLT

In this process, light with a wavelength in the red to the near-infrared region of the spectrum (660nm–905nm) is employed on the skin surface. The reason for using these wavelengths is that they have the ability to penetrate the skin and soft/hard tissues. From various conducted clinical trials, this treatment is proven to have a good effect on pain, inflammation, and repairing of the tissues. The therapy goes from 30 to 120 seconds or more a week, depending upon the pain's severity.

Based on the tissue condition, the therapy can go on for weeks or months. LLLT has resulted in relief and reduction of inflammation, pain relief, and accelerated tissue regeneration.

But how does the light actually work?

LLLT in the Treatment of Pain

Do you know that many acute orthopedic conditions such as strains, sprains, muscular back pain, frozen shoulder, neck and back pain, etc., are amenable to Low Laser Light Therapy (LLLT)?

The Infra-Red light relieves pain in a different section of the body and increases relaxation sensation while also comforting the muscles. LLLT has been shown to enhance the multiplication of cells like fibroblasts, keratinocytes, endothelial cells, and lymphocytes. Fibroblasts and keratinocytes are two major cell types that respond to the inflammatory phase in the repair/regeneration process.

LLLT can enhance neovascularization, promote angiogenesis, and increase collagen synthesis to succor in the healing of acute and chronic wounds. The LED light sessions have shown the ability to heal skin, nerves, tendons, cartilage, and bones. Low-intensity LLLT stimulates mitochondria and also enhances the mitochondrial membrane potential.

The peripheral nerve endings of nociceptors (also known as the pain receptors), consisting of the thinly myelinated and unmyelinated, slow-conducting C fibers, lie within the epidermis. This complex network converts harmful stimuli into action potentials. Moreover, these nerve endings lie on the surface or superficial in nature, making the LLLT wavelength penetration work easy.


Hence, with the rise of chronic pain in different countries, it is imperative to validate cost-effective and safe techniques for managing painful conditions, allowing people to live active and productive lives. Light therapy is constantly evolving in relieving muscular pain. It improves the muscle's endurance, reduces muscle soreness, joint pain, and inflammation.

It’s time to let go of the pain!!

Experience the difference with light therapy from Kaiyan Medical.

More References:

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12605431/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27472858/

https://arthritis-research.biomedcentral.com/track/pdf/10.1186/s13075-015-0882-0

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0004951414601276?via%3Dihub

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4743666/

The Key for Better Sex - Red Light Therapy

The famous fitness coach Ben Greenfield uses red light naked every morning. He flips a switch, flooding the room with a bright red glow. Then he stands naked in the red light for 20 minutes.

“It seems to like, wake you up a little bit; it kind of simulates sunrise,” Greenfield tells. “And it’s almost mildly addictive — the feel-good effect of how you feel after you use one of these.”

Greenfield, a 39-year-old fitness instructor, is an evangelist for red light therapy, a treatment that’s increasingly popular in the world of sports, beauty, and biohacking. Some converts to red-light therapy treatment soak in the ruddy glow for a very personal reason.

Red Light for Testosterone
Red Light Therapy

Light therapy has been for hundreds of years. Recently, we can trace it back to 1967 with Hungarian scientists, red light therapy, scientifically known as photobiomodulation or low-level laser (light) therapy, has made a comeback in the last two decades.

Michael Hamblin, a researcher at Massachusetts General Hospital and professor at Harvard Medical School, explains in a 2017 research paper on the topic that the treatment was confined to a “SCIENTIFIC WASTELAND,” and widely considered “SNAKE OIL.”

But recent studies suggest red-light therapy can improve skin quality, addictions, pets’ mood, sleep quality, depression, muscle recovery, and relieve pain.

Indeed, some studies suggest light therapy stimulates mitochondria, a.k.a. the “powerhouse” of a cell, and increases the production of adenosine triphosphate, the organic chemical that carries energy in the body and plays a big role in metabolism.

Bio-hacking yourself

In Kaiyan Medical, we are on a constant quest to optimize our brains and bodies. Some studies have actually demonstrated that exposing the torso or the testes to light can potentially increase testosterone. In fact, studies on the effects of light on the testes go way back to 1939, when researchers exposed various parts of men’s bodies to UV light. They found that men’s testosterone levels went up by 120% when the participants’ chests were exposed to UV light, and they went up by 200% with UV exposure to the genital area.

Sunlight exposure directly to the testes reportedly has an even more profound effect, boosting production in Leydig cells (the cells that produce testosterone) by an average of 200%

The theory is this: while sunlight has many beneficial effects, such as vitamin D production and improved mood, it is not without its downsides. Too much exposure to sunlight, particularly to sensitive areas like the skin around your precious ball sac, can create sunburn, excess radiation, inflammation and damage. And let’s face it: you don’t want a shrunken, shriveled, dehydrated dick, no matter how impressive the tan.

Red light, however, is different than sunlight. Red light is comprised of light wavelengths in the range of 600–950 nanometers (nm). According to red light therapy proponents, red light works to stimulate ATP production, increase energy available to the cell and in particular, increase the activity of the Leydig cells in your testes, which are the cells responsible for testosterone production.

Optimizing Sex

In the last five years, light therapy researchers and red-light therapy companies set their sights on men like Greenfield — the guy who gets naked every morning in his home office.  “The impact of [low-light therapy] on sexual health is an emerging field, but I see its potential to improve sexual function and libido with recent studies,” Hamblin says. “It has been shown to improve sperm function and may have applications in increasing fertility in both men and women.”  Research on sexual health applications of red-light therapy is relatively minimal in men, and basically nonexistent for women. A few studies in animals suggest red light therapy might influence LEYDIG CELLS — the body’s sperm producers, which live in the testicles. Another study in humans suggests red light therapy can increase testosterone levels and sexual satisfaction.

Don't let the fear defeat you

Sexual health issues — from “low T” to erectile dysfunction — can be challenging to treat because of the social stigma, Goldstein explains. There’s a “fear,” the urologist says. Many men are ashamed and avoid seeing a doctor.  “If they can get something over the counter that's purported to help them, millions of men will be willing to try it and maybe they would never buy it again,” Goldstein tells.  “Good advertising and good marketing will create a market for a product, whether it's proven to be of value or not.”  

Reduce Infertility

One of the biggest concerns for those who suffer from Low-T is infertility. Several studies show that red light therapy helps increase sperm motility, which is essential for successful impregnation. In 2017, researchers from the University of California, San Diego, found that sperm exposed to 630nm red light increased sperm swimming speed and force.

A similar study by researchers from Iran found an after exposing sperm to an 830nm NIR light device. Sperm motility is associated with cellular energy; more energized sperm will swim with greater vigor. This is a vital component of male reproductive health, and success in improving sperm motility points to the use of red light therapy as a way to treat male infertility.

Red Light for Testosterone
Feeling like a super hero

On top of using red light, both Greenfield and Wiles eat healthy, work out regularly, and practice stress-management techniques. Which habit, or a combination of each, helps them “optimize” their sex life or their physical health isn’t clear.

Even though the research doesn’t match their claims — yet— Greenfield and Wiles have no intention of slowing down.  “Before I go and give a presentation or if I'm giving a lecture or even if I'm just seeing a patient in clinic, I'll go ahead and throw that thing on and I will feel like a million bucks," Wiles says. "I’ve noticed increased overall sexual health, sexual satisfaction, and stamina."  Recently, Greenfield has been shining the light for one very specific reason: He and his wife are trying for a baby.  “Sometimes if I know I've got like a date night with my wife or we're going to have sex that night, I'll wait until the evening to do the treatment because the immediate effects are even better, especially the blood flow," Greenfield says.  "Erectile quality is just better right after you use it.”

More References

https://platinumtherapylights.com/blogs/news/red-light-therapy-for-boosting-testosterone

https://www.inverse.com/mind-body/red-light-therapy#:~:text=A%20few%20studies%20in%20animals,testosterone%20levels%20and%20sexual%20satisfaction.

Light Therapy - Color Meaning

Introduction to Color Light Therapy

Color Light therapy is based on the idea of restoring balance by applying color to the body. Its history is rooted as far back as the Mayan culture.

In India, Ayurveda, an ancient form of medicine practiced for thousands of years, is based on the idea that every individual contains five elements of the universe that are present in specific proportions unique to each individual, including their personality type and constitution. When these elements are out of balance, Ayurveda works with the energies inherent in the colors of the spectrum to restore this balance.

In ancient Egypt the art of healing with color was founded in the Hermetic tradition, the Ancient Egyptians and Greeks used colored minerals, stones, crystals, salves, and dyes as remedies, and painted treatment sanctuaries in various shades of color.

In China, traditional Chinese medicine incorporates color to be associated with each organ and elemental system. This healing method looks at the idea that every individual is a balance. The first color wheel was invented by Sir Isaac Newton. He split white sunlight into red, orange, yellow, green, cyan, and blue. He then joined the two ends of the color spectrum together to show the natural progression of colors.

Light Therapy has been valued throughout history as a remarkable source of healing. Today, the therapeutic applications of light and color are being investigated in major hospitals and research centers worldwide. Results indicate that full-spectrum, ultraviolet, colored, and laser light can have therapeutic value for a range of conditions from chronic pain and depression to immune disorders.

Wellness Benefits

Light Therapy has been reported, as part of a healthy lifestyle, to temporarily reduce swelling, relieve pain, decrease inflammation, accelerate open wound healing and greatly reduce overall recovery after medical/surgical procedures. Patients have demonstrated an increased range of motion, decreased muscle tension and spasm, and improved circulation.

Rejuvenating LED light therapy can be used for temporary pain management such as joint and back pain, sore or torn muscles, sprains, arthritis, post-surgical scars, burns, wounds, and more. When used with infrared technology, light therapy (phototherapy) is one of the most effective and non-invasive ways to improve overall wellness.

Light therapy is also used to temporarily relieve Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). SAD affects individuals when the lack of sunlight results in seasonal depression. Phototherapy helps with SAD by resetting the internal biological clock (Circadian rhythms), helping individuals sleep better, and regulate their mood. Even companies, such as GE and Philips, have created phototherapeutic products to improve and regulate mood.

Cosmetic Benefits

Light therapy is also a growing treatment for anti-aging. Many individuals have seen a temporary reduction in the appearance of fine lines, wrinkles, crow’s feet, and age spots.

Light therapy is “effective at improving the appearance of the face, neck, and chest by reducing the signs of aging, wrinkles and age spots”, says Web M.D. Combined with infrared therapy, LED phototherapy can be a great way to revitalize skin.

Healing With Color

Color is light split into different wavelengths vibrating at different speeds and at different frequencies. Objects that ABSORB all wavelengths and DO NOT reflect are black in nature. Objects that REFLECT all wavelengths and DO reflect are white in nature. Between black and white lies COLOR. Colors are wavelengths of energy that, to us, appear as color because of the potential and capabilities of the object to either absorb or reflect the energy.

Red Light

In the early 1990s, RLT was used by scientists to help grow plants in space. The scientists found that the intense light from red light-emitting diodes (LEDs) helped promote the growth and photosynthesis of plant cells.

The red light was then studied for its potential application in medicine, more specifically to find out if RLT could increase energy inside human cells. The researchers hoped that RLT could be an effective way to treat the muscle atrophy, slow wound healing, and bone density issues caused by weightlessness during space travel.

You may have heard of red light therapy (RLT) by its other names, which include:

  • photobiomodulation (PBM)
  • low-level light therapy (LLLT)
  • soft laser therapy
  • cold laser therapy
  • biostimulation
  • photonic stimulation
  • low-power laser therapy (LPLT)

Red is called “The Great Healer”. So far is the most popular light therapy. To wind down before bed, use red light. “The color signals that it’s night, which may encourage the body to produce melatonin,” says Michael Breus, Ph.D., an advisory board member for SleepScore Labs.

Red light can also improve your workout. Just one to five minutes of exposure to red and infrared light right before exercise boosted strength and prevented soreness, says Ernesto Leal-Junior, Ph.D., the head of the Laboratory of Phototherapy in Sports and Exercise at Nove de Julho University in Brazil. “Certain wavelengths of red and infrared light-660 to 905 nanometers-reach skeletal muscle tissue, stimulating the mitochondria to produce more ATP, a substance that cells use as fuel,” he says.

Green Light

Green is the universal healing color. Originally, the color of love. Green is midway in the color spectrum; therefore, it contains both a physical nature and a spiritual nature, in equal balance and in equal harmony.

Gazing at green light can reduce chronic pain (caused by fibromyalgia or migraines, for example) by up to 60 percent, according to a study in the journal Pain, and animal studies have shown that the beneficial effects can last up to nine days. “Looking at green light seems to lead to an increase in the body’s production of enkephalins, pain-killing opioid-like chemicals. And it reduces inflammation, which plays a role in many chronic pain conditions,” says researcher Mohab Ibrahim, M.D., Ph.D.

More studies are needed before doctors can make recommendations on how and how often to use green light to treat migraines and other pain, and Dr. Ibrahim says you should see a physician before trying to treat yourself at home. But at this point research indicates that exposing yourself to an hour or two every night-either by using a green light bulb in a lamp or by wearing glasses fitted with tinted optical filters-may decrease migraines and other types of chronic pain

Helps to treat and prevent hyper-pigmentation by inhibiting the production of excess melanin which then prevents it from traveling to the surface. It will help break up the melanin clusters that are already on the surface.

Yellow Light

Yellow helps awaken mental inspiration arousing a higher mentality. Thus, it is an excellent color for nervous or nerve-related conditions or ailments; fueling the solar plexus. Yellow has a very enriching effect upon the intellect. Yellow can be used for conditions of the stomach, liver, and intestines. It can help the pores of the skin by repairing scarred tissue. These rays have an alkalizing effect which strengthens the nerves. Awakening, inspiring, and vitally stimulating the higher mind promoting self-control. Typical diseases treated by yellow are constipation, gas, liver troubles, diabetes, eczema, and nervous exhaustion. Providing clarity of thought, increasing awareness, stimulating interest, and curiosity yellow energy is related to the ability to perceive or understand.

The yellow is used for treating redness, flushing, irritation, and Rosacea. It may also reduce the appearance of the tiny blood vessels on the nose and face.

Blue Light

Blue light therapy technology is an additional option for the treatment of acne. Research has shown in-office and at-home systems produce positive results.

“Blue light therapy effectively helps alleviate this common skin condition affecting 50 million Americans and 94 percent of all females, according to Judith Hellman, MD, a board-certified dermatologist, in practice in New York City. Dr. Hellman, who practices medical dermatology and specializes in dermatological surgery, laser surgery, and anti-aging skin treatments, explains how the blue light treatment system works for acne, its uses, and her clinical experience with the technology.

Cyan Light

It is used as a gentle acne treatment to control oil production in the skin as well as reduce inflammation. It also promotes the synthesis of protein and collagen.

Orange Light

Orange has a freeing action upon the mind, relieving repression. Because orange is a blend of red and yellow, it combines physical energy with mental wisdom, inducing a transformation between lower physical reaction and higher mental response. Thus, it is often referred to as “The Wisdom Ray.” Orange is warm, cheering, and non-constricting.

Through orange, we are able to heal the physical body (red) and, at the same time, induce within the mind (yellow) greater understanding. Orange helps assimilate new ideas. Orange is the best emotional stimulant, helping to remove inhibitions paving independent social behavior. Bring joy to your workday and strengthen your appetite for life. Orange aids in repairing inflammation of the kidneys, gallstones, menstrual cramps, epilepsy, wet cough, and all sinus conditions.

Purple Light

Violet is the last color we can see before light passes on to ultra-violet. Violet purifies our thoughts and feelings giving us inspiration in all undertakings. The violet energy connects us to our spiritual self bringing guidance, wisdom, and inner strength and enhances artistic talent and creativity. Leonardo da Vinci proclaimed that you can increase the power of meditation ten-fold by meditating under the gentle rays of Violet, as found in church windows.

Light therapy uses colors for their proposed wellness abilities in treating emotional and physical disturbances. Light therapy is based on the premise that different colors evoke different responses in people. For example, some colors are considered to be stimulating, whereas others may be soothing. Color therapy has been suggested for many uses, based on tradition or on scientific theories. Consult with a health care provider before using color therapy for any use.

Infrared Light

Infrared light penetrates to the inner layers of the skin at about 2 to 7 centimeters deep. Hence, it reaches the muscles, nerves, and even the bones. Many studies have shown that a frequency of infrared light, with wavelengths from 700 to 1,000 nanometers, is best used for healing inflammatory conditions.

The use of electricity for healing purposes began in 2,750 BC when people used electric eels to give electric shocks. Electricity and magnetism were used in people with just little success. However, in 1975, transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TENS) was developed to treat chronic pain. It was not until recently that infrared therapy was developed to improve wound healing, reduce the pain caused by arthritis, boost endorphin levels, and bioactivate neuromodulators.

Infrared therapy technology allows people to harness the benefits of the sun, without being exposed to harmful ultraviolet rays. Also, infrared therapy is safe and effective, without adverse side effects. As a matter of fact, infrared light is safe and is used even for infants in neonatal intensive care.

Infrared light is absorbed by the photoreceptors in cells. Once absorbed, the light energy kickstarts a series of metabolic events, triggering several natural processes of the body on a cellular level.

Kaiyan Medical

In Kaiyan, we are in love with light therapy. We believe in the natural balance in our bodies. We develop devices such as the Aduro mask which will provide you with the full range of color light therapies.

References

https://www.estyspot.com/blogs/esthetician-tips/an-estheticians-view-of-led-therapy-benefits-for-all-7-colors

https://www.the-dermatologist.com/content/acne-treatment-blue-light-therapy-benefits-0#:~:text=A%3A%20Blue%20light%20kills%20the,oil%20glands%20in%20the%20skin.

https://www.healthline.com/health/red-light-therapy#summary

https://www.estyspot.com/blogs/esthetician-tips/an-estheticians-view-of-led-therapy-benefits-for-all-7-colors

Deppe A. Ocular light therapy: a case study. Aust J Holist Nurs 2000;7(1):41.

Geldschlager S. Osteopathic versus orthopedic treatments for chronic epicondylopathia humeri radialis: a randomized controlled trial. Forsch Komplementarmed Klass Naturheilkd 2004;Apr, 11(2):93-97.

Maher CG. Effective physical treatment of chronic low back pain. Orthop Clin North Am 2004;Jan, 35(1):57-64.

Natural Standard Research Collaboration, Chief Editors: Ulbricht C, Basch E, Natural Standard Herb and Supplement Reference: Evidence-Based Clinical Reviews, USA. Elsevier/Mosby, 2005.

Ohara M, Kawashima Y, Kitajima s, et al. Inhibition Of lung metastasis of B16 melanoma cells exposed to blue light in mice. Int J Molecular Medicine 2002;10(6):701-705.

Wileman SM, Eagles JM, Andrew JE, et al. Light therapy for seasonal affective disorder in primary care: randomised controlled trial. Br J Psych 2001;178:311-316.

Wohlfarth H, Schultz A. The effect of colour psychodynamic environment modification on sound levels in elementary schools. Int J Biosocial Res 2002;(5):12-19.

Zifkin BG, Inoue Y. Visual reflex seizures induced by complex stimuli. Epilepsia 2004;45(Suppl 1):27-29.

The 5 Best LED Pain Relievers

What is Holistic Medicine?

Holistic medicine is a whole-body approach to healthcare. It aims to improve health and wellness through the body, mind, and soul.

Principles of Holistic Medicine

Holistic medicine is based on several core values:

  • Good health is a combination of physical, emotional, mental, spiritual, and social wellness.
  • Prevention first, treatment second.
  • The disease is caused by a problem with the whole body, rather than a single event or body part.
  • The goal of treatment is to fix the underlying cause of disease, instead of just improving the symptoms.
LED Light Therapy: What is it, and Does it Work?

LED stands for light-emitting diode. These lights have been in use since the 1960s, but people have only recently begun to use them as a skin treatment.

NASA originally developed LED lights for plant growth experiments in space.

However, since then, LEDs have shown promising results in wound healing and human tissue growth.

Different wavelengths of light in LED lights, including blue and red, penetrate the skin at different depths. This penetration may trigger biological processes that help the skin rejuvenate and heal.

LED light therapy is a popular non-invasive skin treatment for acne, sun damage, wounds, and other skin problems.

If you prefer to avoid the pharmaceutical way to manage issues with joints or muscles, you might want to try one of these LED pain relievers instead. Using a combination of wavelengths from the visible and infrared light spectrum, you can help to relieve many conditions, including arthritis, without the risk of potentially harmful side effects.

Here the Top 5 Pain Relief Devices


5) Double Side FDA Cleared Red/Infrared Lights Therapy Glove

People suffering from arthritis or a repetitive strain injury to their fingers or wrists can appreciate the design of the Red Light Therapy Double Side. It surrounds your hand for complete coverage.


4)The Multifunction Pen LED

For a portable solution, the multifunction pen LED is about the size of a small flashlight. It uses a special wavelength that’s supposed to offer antiinflammatory effects in localized areas of application.

3) Handheld Device with LED Red Light

The handheld device boasts an ergonomic handle that has comfortable rests for your fingers to provide you with a firm grip as you use it. Its compact design makes it a good option for travel.



2)Light Therapy Infrared Light Panel for Whole Body

With a bigger number of diodes, this panel is designed for deeper penetration than many of its competitors. It claims to be able to help reduce inflammation, stimulate cell growth, and increase circulation.

1. FDA Cleared Red/Infrared Led Light Therapy Pad

The sheer size of the therapy pad makes it suitable for treating a wide number of areas on the body, most notably the lower back. With only 15minutes of therapy needed, is the best balance between convenience and LED power.

To order or discuss your LED light medical device don’t hesitate to contact us at info@kaiyanmedical.com


Which is the Vitamin that is not Normally Found in any Vegetarian Food? — Vitamin D

What would happen if you don’t get enough sun?

Which is the vitamin that is not normally found in any vegetarian food? Vitamin D.

Scientists have defined vitamins as organic (carbon-containing) chemicals that must be obtained from dietary sources because they are not produced by our bodies. Vitamins play a crucial role in our body’s metabolism, but only tiny amounts are needed to fill that role.

The discovery of Vitamin D was the culmination of a long search for a way to cure rickets in the 1920s, a painful childhood bone disease. Within a decade, the fortification of foods with vitamin D was on the way, and rickets became rare in the United States. However, research results suggest that vitamin D may have a role in other aspects of human health.

Vitamin Dit’s absent from all-natural foods except for fish and egg yolks, and even when it’s obtained from foods, it must be transformed by the body before it can do any good. That’s why the energy of the Sun is so important.

The sun’s energy turns a chemical in your skin into vitamin D3, which is carried to your liver and then your kidneys to transform it into active vitamin D.

The main cause of vitamin D deficiency is a lack of direct sunlight.
The main cause of vitamin D deficiency is a lack of direct sunlight

Humans, day by day, spend less time outdoors. Most people work indoors now, and many of our leisure pursuits occur in an indoor setting as well. What’s more, when we are outside, many people avoid the sun as much as possible. The result is the body not absorbing enough UVB rays to create the amount of vitamin D it requires. Often, symptoms of vitamin D deficiency are quite mild. When noticed, they mainly consist of:

  • Bone pain.
  • Chronic fatigue.
  • Frequent bone fractures.
  • Muddled thought processes.
  • Muscle weakness.
  • Soft or deformed bones.

Though you may not notice any symptoms, that doesn’t mean that vitamin D deficiency doesn’t present serious health risks. These include:

  • Children may develop severe asthma.
  • Immune system problems, raising your risk of infection.
  • Insulin resistance, impacting your body’s ability to process sugar and increasing your risk of diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and glucose intolerance.
  • Osteoporosis, a condition that includes brittle bones that are more likely to fracture.
  • Reduced cognitive function.
  • Rickets, a bone disease that causes soft bones and skeletal deformities.
Other conditions that would happen without enough sunlight

Less chance of having a baby

Without sunlight, there will be more melatonin in a woman’s body. This is a hormone that suppresses fertility, thereby reducing her chances of conceiving a baby. Moreover, women who get less sunlight reach their menopause earlier than those who are exposed to the Sun. Men can also suffer from a lack of sunlight; it directly influences testosterone levels.

Less chance of having a baby

Raw nerves

It’s believed that if children don’t get enough sunlight, they’ll be more at risk of developing multiple sclerosis, a disease of the central nervous system when they become adults.

All those aches and pains

Without sunlight, be prepared to get more pains all over your body. Sunlight helps to warm the body’s muscles and reduce the pain caused by inflammatory conditions such as arthritis.

No sunny emotions

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Without sunlight, we would be forever stuck with the seasonal affective disorder (SAD), commonly known as the winter blues. It’s a form of depression that is specifically caused by a lack of sunlight. Artificial light cannot fully replace natural sunlight.

Recent evidence suggests that vitamin D may help prevent many disorders, such as diabetes, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, bronchitis, premenstrual syndrome, increased blood pressure, strokes and heart attacks, and even cancer. Low serum vitamin D levels are also associated with being overweight, abdominal obesity, metabolic syndrome, stroke, and diabetes. In addition, having lower blood vitamin D levels for a long period is associated with increased heart attacks and all-cause mortality.

In Kaiyan medical, we believe in the benefits of light. We believe in healing without chemicals. With our lights, we want you to have the best version of yourself. More at kaiyanmedical.com

References:

Holick MF (March 2006). “High prevalence of vitamin D inadequacy and implications for health”. Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 81 (3): 353–73. doi:10.4065/81.3.353. PMID 16529140.

Holick MF (December 2004). “Sunlight and vitamin D for bone health and prevention of autoimmune diseases, cancers, and cardiovascular disease”. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 80 (6 Suppl): 1678S–88S. doi:10.1093/ajcn/80.6.1678S. PMID 15585788.

Weick MT (November 1967). “A history of rickets in the United States”. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 20 (11): 1234–41. doi:10.1093/ajcn/20.11.1234. PMID 4862158.

Aghajafari F, Nagulesapillai T, Ronksley PE, Tough SC, O’Beirne M, Rabi DM (March 2013). “Association between maternal serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level and pregnancy and neonatal outcomes: systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies”. BMJ. 346: f1169. doi:10.1136/bmj.f1169. PMID 23533188.

Palacios C, De-Regil LM, Lombardo LK, Peña-Rosas JP (November 2016). “Vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy: Updated meta-analysis on maternal outcomes”. The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. 164: 148–155. doi:10.1016/j.jsbmb.2016.02.008. PMC 5357731. PMID 26877200.

Roth DE, Leung M, Mesfin E, Qamar H, Watterworth J, Papp E (November 2017). “Vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy: state of the evidence from a systematic review of randomised trials”. BMJ. 359: j5237. doi:10.1136/bmj.j5237. PMC 5706533. PMID 29187358.