Half a Trillion-Dollar Market  —  Men.

There’s an emerging disruptor in the beauty industry as companies target a different consumer type to expand the half a trillion-dollar market — men.

Across the globe, men’s adoption of beauty use is already starting to take off. But the trend comes in many different shapes and forms. For beauty companies struggling to find new avenues of growth, it’s a huge opportunity to see whether men are looking for traditional grooming products, discreet moisturizers, beauty balms, or popular light therapy.

According to Allied Market Research, the men’s personal care industry is predicted to hit $166 billion by 2022. According to market researcher NPD Group, just last year, men’s skin-care products alone saw a more than 7% jump in sales and with the category currently valued at $122 million.

“In recent years, the notion that men can’t or shouldn’t be using skin-care products or caring more in general about all aspects of their appearance has been receding,”

Said Andrew Stablein, a research analyst at Euromonitor International, in a research note.

The success of digitally native brands catered directly to men such as Harry’s and popular subscription service Dollar Shave Club reveal

“the average men’s grooming routine isn’t about just shaving, but can be aided by using skin-care products,”

Stablein said.

Even high-end designers like Chanel have jumped on the trend, launching its first made-for-men skincare and cosmetics line known as “Boy De Chanel” last September.

“It seems that mass players are trying to expand their market and gain share in a slowing market by growing their user base,”

Said Alison Gaither, beauty and personal care analyst at Mintel.

This includes tutorials from U.K. makeup artist Charlotte Tilbury and Rihanna’s Fenty brand, which have both put out instructions for guys who want to use makeup subtly for a more groomed appearance.

According to Coresight Research, the Asia Pacific market is now one of the fastest-growing regions for men’s grooming and cosmetic product use. Jason Chen, general manager for Chinese online retail site Tmall, told Coresight that “supply cannot meet the demand for male make-up products across China.”

However, recent data suggests the new generation of beauty consumers prefer a non-binary approach altogether. According to NPD’s iGen Beauty Consumer report, nearly 40% of adults aged 18–22 have shown interest in gender-neutral beauty products and holistic products.

“There are so many … [people] growing up with the idea that you’re not tied to the gender you’re born with,”

Said Larissa Jensen, a beauty industry analyst at NPD.

“Beauty is no longer what you’re putting out as ‘ideal beauty.’ Beauty can be anything, anyone, and any gender.”

In 2016, shortly after Coty acquired CoverGirl, the brand made history with its first-ever “CoverBoy” featuring popular YouTube makeup artist James Charles.

Charles recently found himself in a very public spat with Tati Westbrook, another YouTube beauty vlogger. Coverage of the feud, which began after Charles backed a vitamin brand that was a rival to Westbrook’s own, has been widespread and shows the influence these internet personalities have and how the business has evolved over the past two years.

While Charles may be having his struggles now, as he has lost millions of subscribers, the attention he originally received from CoverGirl sparked similar collaborations by major brands including L’Oreal, who featured beauty blogger Manny Gutierrez, known under the moniker Manny MUA, as the face of its Maybelline Colossal mascara campaign in 2017.

“I think a lot of people misconstrue a man wearing makeup as someone that is transgender or someone that wants to be a drag queen, but it’s not that,”

Guitterez, founder and CEO of Lunar beauty told CNBC.

“I think right now people are still intimidated by the aspect of it.”

Gutierrez’s makeup tutorials and product reviews have attracted nearly 5 million subscribers to his YouTube page. According to a note by the NPD Group, one setting powder product saw a 40% surge in sales after Gutierrez promoted it on his YouTube channel.

“It’s all about inclusivity and encouraging people to be a little more inclusive with both men and women,”

Said Gutierrez.

“I think that as time progresses and you see more men in beauty, it’ll get a little bit better and better.”



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Light Therapy Proves Effective in COVID-19 Treatment Once Again

Even though we’ve been in the pandemic for over a year now, we are still collecting knowledge on the disease. No one could’ve prepared us for the impact of this virus, and COVID-19 has changed our lives forever. 

It is a disease caused by the coronavirus, and the symptoms are similar, but people react differently. It isn’t a virus that gives the same outcome, which is why we have to be so cautious with it. Most common symptoms include fever and dry cough, and extreme fatigue. Apart from those, the other major symptoms are a loss of smell and taste, joint pain, diarrhea, conjunctivitis, and headaches.

Scientists and doctors have learned that respiratory problems are the biggest issue while having the disease. The downfall of our immune system during COVID-19 is what gives a chance for pneumonia to develop. Apart from those symptoms and the dangers of getting pneumonia, there’s also potential long-term effects. 

So far, only one peer-reviewed study has reported results on the long-term symptoms of COVID-19 infection: a single group of 143 survivors from Rome. Most of them did not need hospitalization and were assessed at least 60 days after infection. They reported a worsened quality of life in 44.1% of cases, including symptoms of persistent fatigue (53.1%), breathlessness (43.4%), joint pain (27.3%), and chest pain (21.7%).

Treatment has evolved within this short period, and now with the vaccine in power, it poses a question: is it the only solution? It's still necessary to nourish our immune system no matter what; intake of vitamins and supplements is still highly advised. But naturally, aside from the vaccine, you would want a non-invasive alternative as well, which is where light therapy comes into play.

Red light therapy is a non-invasive and non-pharmaceutical method of treatment. It works with light that emits at a close, safe distance, penetrating into the cells. Once it reaches cell level, it helps reproduce ATP, which gives a higher and better cell turnout. 

Our cells rejuvenate and reproduce themselves; light therapy only aids in this natural process. With light therapy, we get a better and higher count of cells that are genetically improved over time with treatment. 

The ways in which light therapy can help with COVID-19 have been studied for a while now, and we shared some information on early clinical trials with you previously. 

Light therapy can help with COVID-19 in reducing severity and prominence of symptoms; it works so that light therapy generates the activation of mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS), thus resulting in the reduced expression of viral spike protein and restores the proliferation of infected cells.

Your cells are healing your body by using light therapy––similar to how UV light therapy aids wound healing––and it is there to provide you with more vital cells for your system. A significant reduction of viral infection in the trachea was noticed, the spots where we notice symptoms first, such as our nose and our throats. This means that light therapy helps regulate and decrease the possibility of getting a respiratory disease like pneumonia. 

A significantly smaller level of C-reactive protein was observed within seven days of UVA therapy regarding biochemical parameters. It proves that light therapy helps with the deconstruction of damaging proteins in our cells. 

Photo-disinfection is used to get rid of harmful bacteria from surgical patients; this is only another form of that. There's also a method where a non-toxic dye is inserted into the nose. It is one that is triggered by light, and then it is measured whether or not the light therapy device has successfully inactivated the virus. This method is used in the early stages of COVID-19.

The one used in the beforehand mentioned study included a light therapy device equipped with a multi-LED UVA light catheter connected to the nasal tube to deliver UVA light to the patients. Our devices are created with multi-LED, so the type of light therapy is your choice, depending on your needs.

The UVA therapy was administered for 20 minutes to all patients once daily for 5 consecutive days. Before the treatment, all patients received oxygen supplementation for 30 minutes. The regimen varies however light therapy should be done consecutively and 10 to 15 minutes.

The coronavirus is still here, but you’re not defenseless. Kaiyan Medical works to develop the best high-quality light therapy devices, with FDA-approved and MDA-certified light therapy devices perfect for at-home treatments. Whether you’re looking to bolster your immune system or wish to provide non-invasive treatment to patients with COVID-19, light therapy is an incredibly powerful and effective tool in fighting the serious symptoms of this virus.

Beard Growth & Light Therapy

Beard Growth & Light Therapy

“The benefit of having a beard is protection, as well as aesthetics,” says Dave Harvey, M.D. “It's good protection against wind, chafing, and traumatic injury. It’s also a trend, so we see a lot of men with some form of facial hair.”

The Health Benefits of Beards

Beards can:

  • Protect skin from sun damage. Beards can help protect the skin from harmful UV rays, though the degree of protection may depend on hair density and thickness. “You’re going to have some protection because hair is a reflective medium,” says Dr. Harvey. “Even though some UV rays get through, there is some scattering of the light, and that’s how it helps protect against sun damage.”
  • Keep you warm. Beards can add a layer of protection to your chin and neck, thus keeping you warm in colder weather. The longer and fuller the beard, the better it will insulate your face.
  • Make you feel more attractive. A study conducted by the Official Journal of the Human Behavior and Evolution Society found that men with a moderately full beard are most attractive. Men with full beards may be perceived as better fathers who could protect and invest in their children. “Men with beards have a powerful look,” says Dr. Harvey. “And that’s an attractive thing.”

Common Problems for Beard Growers

Growing a beard is not always easy. And if your beard is not properly cared for, it can become a harbinger for bacteria.

“If you don’t clean your beard well, and you let it just do its own thing, sometimes you can accumulate yeast and get dandruff within the beard,” says Dr. Harvey. “With that, you’ll get a reactive scaling on the face and flaking like you would with dandruff. So those patients need to be put on antifungal shampoo.”

Beard growers also face the challenge of ingrown follicles that result in bumps known as acne keloidalis.

“Some men will get a raised scarring type of bump called an acne keloidalis of the neck,” he says. “So we offer them topical antibiotics or Retin A for those particular reasons.”

Low-Level Laser Therapy for Beards

Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is an FDA-approved treatment using laser light energy to circulate blood flow to hair follicles. Laser therapy for hair growth can be used to stop hair loss in men and women. The non-invasive lasers stimulate hair follicles to induce regrowth, resulting in a thicker beard in several weeks of treatments.

Laser hair therapy is also called red light therapy. The process irradiates photons in skin tissue, resulting in photons being absorbed into weaker hair follicles and promoting hair growth.

How Successful Is Laser Hair Restoration?

Laser treatment for hair loss works because photons amp up circulation and stimulation, which brings back hair follicles that may have died off.

Clinical Study

Laser hair restoration therapy is continuing to develop. Still, the National Institutes of Health has conducted multiple studies on laser hair growth therapy to see if it works for those with alopecia and male pattern baldness.

The NIH study used a controlled clinical trial that found laser hair therapy works for men and women, and it’s safe.

Another study from 2013 included male participants aged 18 to 48. The result of laser hair therapy treatment included a 39 percent increase in hair growth for participants over four months.

However, laser therapy is just one piece of the puzzle. Many factors contribute to repeated hair loss, including:

  • Age.
  • Genetics.
  • Medical conditions like diabetes and lupus.
  • Hormones.
  • Poor diet.
  • Side effects of medications, such as chemotherapy.
  • Stress.

How Long Does Laser Hair Therapy Take To Work?

From your first treatment, it can take several weeks to see a noticeable difference. This is because red light therapy for hair loss must be administered multiple times over 4 to 6 weeks to begin working.

If you don’t see any growth after 90 days, it’s probably unlikely you’ll regrow hair with this method. You should consult your doctor about the growth cycle and see how long it will take.

All About Fascia and Light Therapy

Fascia is a layer of fibrous tissue – or the connective tissue structure that covers muscles, muscle groups, blood vessels, and nerves, joining some structures while allowing others to slide over each other gently. It’s essentially a band or sheet of connective tissue, mainly collagen, under the skin that attaches, stabilizes, encloses, and separates muscles and other internal organs. We classify it by layer as superficial fascia, deep fascia, visceral or parietal fascia.

And its function is significant in the human body. Fascia is what distributes water equally into our carefully structured skin system. It's mainly made up of collagen and ground substance. So how can fascia be harmful?

In itself, fascia isn’t something bad – in fact, is essential to a healthy body; but if it isn't functioning optimally, things can take an ugly turn. The dysfunction of our fascial system can cause great discomfort and pain. Fascia is ideally supposed to move around as we do, and yet there are many things that cause problems with this tissue. 

When fascia is in a shortened position for prolonged periods due to such a lifestyle and overall poor posture, it will adapt – shortening and tightening. Fascial restrictions can also occur from trauma, infection, inflammation, or surgery. These changes affect our fascia's regular movement, creating tension points in our body, pain, applying pressure to surrounding tissues. Therefore, it causes restriction of movement due to the pain and tightening that occurs. So – how can light therapy help?


Light Therapy for Fascia Treatment

Light therapy consists of exposure to a filtered light with an intensity of up to 10,000 lux emitted by a particular lamp. Through light, it can help with a number of problems and specifically offers great benefits to the skin. 

Light therapy treatment for fascia can be done any time of the day; however, it is best done in the early hours of the morning, with a duration of up to 30 minutes, and must be repeated for long-term effect. 

Next to doing stretches and trying other forms of relaxation methods to release tension, fascia can be treated with light therapy. The skin reacts biochemically to light therapy, directly improving cell functions. ATP, our energy source, increases in production with light therapy treatment, resulting in improved cell rejuvenation. Light therapy benefits are that they reduce the discomfort of pain and inflammation by increasing blood flow and tissue repair mechanisms in the body.

Apart from a healthy functioning body, keeping your fascia rejuvenated also helps with appearance. Body symmetry and alignment improve, the blood flow increases, which gives faster exercise recovery, stretch marks and cellulite get reduced, scar tissue breaks down easier, and overall less pain and better performance in the day-to-day tasks. 

Repairing connective tissue such as fascia helps with muscle recovery, which is why light therapy is also used in sports. In the release of ATP, our muscles gain their power back. With light therapy, the recovery is sped up; sessions improve the time it usually takes for our cells to do it themselves. 

Plantar fasciitis is often created from strain at the ligament of the sole of the foot. It's a pain in our heels, and with light therapy, tissue repair is accelerated. Light therapy is an overall regenerating way of treating any issue related to connective tissues. 

Light therapy can also help with cellulite. In itself, cellulite isn't a health issue, but since light therapy helps collagen production, in the same way it helps fascia, it can also be effective with cellulite. With higher collagen levels, skin appears smoother and tightens, which can reduce the appearance of cellulite. 

Light therapy, while treating fascia, can also treat other issues. There are different ways to use light therapy and different settings for different outcomes. Infrared light is used for tissue repair, pain reduction, and similar problems. Red light resolves problems such as inflammation, tissue repair at the surface level, general pain relief as well. Blue light is ideal for combating bacterial issues that lead to our skin becoming acne-prone even when we're past that stage. 

That said, you want to make sure you are using the right red light device. At Kaiyan Medical, we have MDA-certified and FDA-approved laser light therapy devices that will make sure you’re receiving medical-grade light therapy treatment for your fascia and other issues. 

Green Light for Migraines: Does This Therapy Work?


“Migraine is one of the most common neurological conditions in the world, and it’s debilitating,” said Dr. Ibrahim

Green Light

The noninvasive nature of green light exposure makes it an ideal therapeutic candidate for other neurological conditions, such as fibromyalgia or HIV-related pain. Dr. Ibrahim and his team recently completed another clinical study in which people with fibromyalgia tried green light therapy. Like the migraine study, those results are similarly encouraging.

Clinical Study

Pharmacological management of migraines can be ineffective for some patients. Studies previously demonstrated that exposure to green light resulted in antinociception and reversal of thermal and mechanical hypersensitivity in rodent pain models. Given green light-emitting diodes' safety, they evaluated green light as a potential therapy in patients with episodic or chronic migraines.

For the study, they recruited (29 total) patients, of whom seven had episodic migraines, and 22 had chronic migraines. They used a one-way cross-over design consisting of exposure for 1–2 hours daily to the white light-emitting diodes for 10 weeks, followed by a 2-week washout period followed by exposure for 1–2 hours daily green light-emitting diodes for 10 weeks. Patients were allowed to continue current therapies and to initiate new treatments as directed by their physicians. Outcomes consisted of patient-reported surveys. The primary outcome measure was the number of headache days per month. Secondary outcome measures included patient-reported changes in the headaches' intensity and frequency over a two-week period and other quality of life measures, including the ability to fall and stay asleep and ability to perform work. Changes in pain medications were obtained to assess potential reduction.

When seven episodic migraine and 22 chronic migraine patients were analyzed as separate cohorts, white light-emitting diodes produced no significant change in headache days in either episodic migraine or chronic migraine patients. Combining data from the episodic migraine and chronic migraine groups showed that white light-emitting diodes produced a small but statistically significant reduction in headache days (days ± SEM) 18.2 ± 1.8 to 16.5 ± 2.01 days. Green light-emitting diodes resulted in a significant decrease in headache days from 7.9 ± 1.6 to 2.4 ± 1.1 and 22.3 ± 1.2 to 9.4 ± 1.6 in episodic migraine and chronic migraine patients, respectively. While some improvement in secondary outcomes was observed with white light-emitting diodes, more secondary outcomes with significantly greater magnitude, including assessments of the quality of life, Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire, Headache Impact Test-6, and Five-level version of the EuroQol five-dimensional survey without reported side effects, were observed with green light-emitting diodes. Conclusions regarding pain medications reduction with green light-emitting diode exposure were not possible. No side effects of light therapy were reported. None of the patients in the study reported initiation of new therapies.

Green light-emitting diodes significantly reduced the number of headache days in people with episodic migraines or chronic migraines. Additionally, the green light-emitting diodes significantly improved multiple secondary outcome measures, including quality of life, intensity, and headache attack duration. As no adverse events were reported, the green light-emitting diodes may provide a treatment option for those patients who prefer non-pharmacological therapies or may be considered in complementing other treatment strategies. The limitations of this study are the small number of patients evaluated. The positive data obtained support the implementation of larger clinical trials to determine the possible effects of green light-emitting diode therapy.


This study is registered with clinicaltrials.gov under NCT03677206.

https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0333102420956711

Infographic: What is Red Light Therapy?

Work from Home, Light Therapy Style

This past year has shaken us up, leaving many of us in new routines that we’re still adjusting to. Unless you’re an essential worker, many of us are now working from home to reduce contact with others. Though working from home was a dream for many, it’s safe to say we didn’t imagine things working from home looking like this.  

The quick transition from in-office to working from home has left many unprepared. Aside from working under stressful conditions, most people simply brought home their laptop, thinking this would be a short-term situation. But things didn’t go as planned.

A year has passed, and those same people are still working from their kitchen table. The problem? Working from home can do more harm than good when it comes to our mental and physical health. And with that, there’s an increased risk of burning out, injuring yourself from a lack of proper office equipment, and the blurred lines between one’s personal and work life. 

So how do you divide work life from home life if your home has become your workplace? 

When all these issues compile on top of each other, it’s a recipe for disaster. More people who work from home are experiencing neck and joint pain, increased screen time, poor sleep, eye strain, and heightened stress and fatigue levels. 

Naturally, most doctors will say the remedies for these symptoms is to reduce stress by working out, meditating, going into nature, taking more breaks, massaging sore muscles, or working with proper equipment. But with lockdowns and quarantines implemented, those solutions aren’t necessarily available. 

However, red light therapy is an all-in-one treatment therapy that can promote quality sleep, reduced stress, and alleviate neck and joint pain. 

But how does red light therapy work? 

Let’s take a look at how light therapy treats neck and shoulder pain.

Most treatments for neck and shoulder pain consist of physical therapy, massage, or pain relief medication. But red light therapy has proven to be a non-invasive option for significantly reducing neck and shoulder pain. 

Red light therapy works by reducing inflammation, which is usually both the cause and symptom of neck and shoulder pain. Red and infrared light penetrates through the skin, reaching the cells that produce energy (adenosine triphosphate) in the mitochondria. By increasing the function of the mitochondria, cells make more adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and begin the process of rejuvenating and repairing themselves.

When inflammation occurs in the body, red light therapy repairs those damaged cells in the muscles, tendons, and ligaments, reducing the pain felt in the neck and shoulders.

However, as we stated earlier, red light therapy isn’t only for neck and joint pain. When it comes to inflammation, it occurs everywhere in the body, including the eyes. 

When working from home, we are typically spending three more hours per day in front of our electronic devices. This has a serious impact on eyesight and overall well being. Research has shown that red light therapy treatments can help heal the eyes from injury, reduce inflammation, and protect against vision loss. 

As we spend more time in front of our devices, we experience more fatigue and reduced quality of sleep. Red light therapy helps trigger our natural circadian rhythm and promotes improved sleep, thus reducing fatigue. 

Working from home hasn’t been the dream we’ve all hoped for. In fact, it’s negatively impacted our mental and physical health. However, there’s a solution to your symptoms and it’s red light therapy. 

Kaiyan Medical manufactures MDA-certified and FDA-approved laser light therapy devices, ideal for people who are experiencing symptoms from working from home, including eye strain, fatigue, stress, and neck and shoulder pain. 




The Perfect Pair: Light Therapy & PRP

Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) Injections

In recent years, doctors have learned that the body has the ability to heal itself. Platelet-rich plasma therapy is a form of regenerative medicine that can harness those abilities and amplify the natural growth factors your body uses to heal tissue.

What is Plasma, and what are Platelets?

Plasma is the liquid portion of whole blood. It is composed largely of water and proteins, and it provides a medium for red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets to circulate through the body. Platelets, also called thrombocytes, are blood cells that cause blood clots and other necessary growth healing functions. Platelet activation plays a key role in the body’s natural healing process.

What is Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP), and what are PRP injections?

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) therapy uses injections of a concentration of a patient’s own platelets to accelerate the healing of injured tendons, ligaments, muscles, and joints. In this way, PRP injections use each patient’s own healing system to improve musculoskeletal problems.

PRP injections are prepared by taking anywhere from one to a few tubes of your own blood and running it through a centrifuge to concentrate the platelets. These activated platelets are then injected directly into your injured or diseased body tissue. This releases growth factors that stimulate and increase the number of reparative cells your body produces.

Ultrasound imaging is sometimes used to guide the injection. The photographs below illustrate a PRP injection into a patient’s torn tendon. The ultrasound guidance is shown at the left, and the injection is shown at the right.

PRP harnesses the body’s own rejuvenating powers to stimulate hair growth naturally. The treatment involves drawing a small amount of blood from the patient’s arm. This blood is then spun in a centrifuge until the plasma is separated and growth factors and stem cells are extracted. This plasma, complete with growth factors and stem cells, is then injected into the patient’s scalp, stimulating hair growth.

Light Therapy

Red Light/Blue Light therapy uses light energy to stimulate hair growth. Red light/Blue Light therapy works using light delivered at specific therapeutic wavelengths within infrared and red-light spectrums. The energy from these lights stimulates the hair follicles so that they are constantly in the growth, or anagen, stage. This results in thicker, longer, and healthier hair.

Red light (630 nm) therapy stimulates ATP (cellular energy) production to stimulate hair follicle cells. It also increases blood flow to the hair root, which delivers more nutrients to the hair follicle cells. The increased blood flow is also thought to help flush away the damaging waste products that may affect hair growth.

Near-Infrared light (880 nm) therapy, which is an invisible light energy, promotes collagen and elastin production. It penetrates deeper into the scalp to help reduce inflammation, which causes thinning of hair.

Blue light (420 nm) therapy is especially effective for acne, penetrating molecules within the skin that cause P. acnes bacteria to form. These molecules react

Light Therapy & C-sections

The experience of transformation from womanhood into motherhood is a privilege reserved exclusively for women. Pregnancy and childbirth are wonderful and remarkable moments of life. Giving birth to a child can be one of the most joyful experiences too. Naturally, expectant mothers spend a lot of time thinking about how they will give birth. Although most people believe that vaginal birth is the best way to deliver, sometimes a Caesarean section cannot be avoided. As well, labor pain is one of the most intense pains experienced by women, which leads to an increase in the number of women opting to undergo a cesarean delivery. Pharmacological and nonpharmacological analgesia methods are used to control labor pain. Epidural analgesia is the most commonly used pharmacological analgesia method. However, it may have side effects on the fetus and the mother. Light-emitting diode (LED) photobiomodulation is an effective and noninvasive alternative to pharmacological methods.

Caesarean section was introduced in clinical practice as a lifesaving procedure both for the mother and the baby. It is a surgical procedure in which the incision is made on the products of conception. Caesarean birth is often used as a prophylactic measure to alleviate the problems of birth, such as cephalo pelvic disproportion, failure to progress in labor or fetal distress. A major concern in maternal and child health nursing is the increasing number of caesarean birth being performed annually. In India, primary caesarean birth is about 30.2% of births. The majority of the states are within the WHO specified range of Caesarean section (5 to 15%). Among that, five states are above the range and 12 states below the specified range. Reports also say that the prevalence of Caesarean section is generally more in the southern states. After the baby is born via C-section, the result is a wound that must heal, and pain is common during this healing process.

Wound healing acceleration and pain management in women who underwent the cesarean surgery could help them to return to their normal functioning, especially to begin breastfeeding their newborns as one of the most important aspects of newborn care. Failure incomplete healing of the wound is one of the probable complications of caesarean section. Post caesarean wound infection due to delayed wound healing and pain are not only a leading cause of prolonged hospital stay but a major cause of the widespread aversion to caesarean delivery in developing countries. Management of those problems is essential to decrease infection, length of the hospital stay, pain, and help to return for normal function.

Mothers who undergo caesarean section should achieve immediate recovery than other surgical patients because of maternal and neonatal wellbeing. Several studies have investigated many approaches and protocols of wound healing and pain management in women undergoing caesarean section. Though different approaches have been introduced, these approaches are still inadequate and unsatisfactory in many patients. Thus it seems that postoperative management in this group of people is more challenging than other surgical patients. Infrared Rays have a therapeutic effect of increasing the blood supply and relieving the pain. This will increase the supply of oxygen and nutrient available to the tissues, accelerate the removal of the waste products, and bring about the resolution of inflammation. When the heat is mild, pain relief is probably due to the sedative effect on the superficial sensory nerve endings. It also helps to achieve muscular relaxation. Infrared rays also have a physiological effect on cutaneous vasodilation due to the liberation of chemical vasodilators, histamine, and similar substance, and a possible direct effects on the blood vessels. Stronger heating of infrared stimulates the superficial nerve endings. It has been noticed that pain is due to the accumulation of waste products, and because of stronger heating, the blood flow increases and removes that waste product, and the pain is relieved. In some cases, the relief of pain is probably associated with muscle relaxation. The muscle relaxes most readily when the tissue is warm. The relief of pain itself facilitates muscle relaxation. So the infrared radiation is considered a choice of Electro Therapy Modality for wound healing and pain among mothers who underwent caesarean.

References

Hopkins K (2000) Are Brazilian women really choosing to deliver by cesarean? Soc Sci Med 51:725–740

https://doi.org/10.1590%2F1806-9282.64.11.1045

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=16192541

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=10594500

Light & Water: The Fourth Phase

Water has three phases — gas, liquid, and solid; but inside Dr.Pollack’s lab, findings imply the presence of a surprisingly extensive fourth phase that occurs at interfaces. The formal name for this fourth phase is exclusion-zone water, aka EZ water. This finding may have profound implications for chemistry, physics, and biology.

The impact of surfaces on the contiguous aqueous phase is generally thought to extend no more than a few water-molecule layers. However, Dr.Pollack found that colloidal and molecular solutes are profoundly excluded from hydrophilic surfaces' vicinity to distances up to several hundred micrometers. Such large exclusion zones have been observed next to many different hydrophilic surfaces, and many diverse solutes are excluded. Hence, the exclusion phenomenon appears to be quite general.​​

Multiple methods have been applied to test whether the exclusion zone's physical properties differ from those of bulk water. NMR, infrared, and birefringence imaging, as well as measurements of electrical potential, viscosity, and UV-VIS and infrared-absorption spectra, collectively reveal that the solute-free zone is a physically distinct, ordered phase of water. It is much like a liquid crystal. It can co-exist essentially indefinitely with the contiguous solute-containing phase. Indeed, this unexpectedly extensive zone may be a candidate for the long-postulated “fourth phase” of water considered by earlier scientists.​

The energy responsible for building this charged, low entropy zone comes from light. We found that incident radiant energy, including UV, visible, and near-infrared wavelengths, induce exclusion-zone growth in a spectrally sensitive manner. IR is particularly effective. Five-minute radiation exposure at 3.1 µm (corresponding to OH stretch) causes an exclusion-zone-width increase of up to three times. Apparently, incident photons cause some change in bulk water that predisposes constituent molecules to reorganize and build the charged, ordered exclusion zone. How this occurs is under study.​

Photons from ordinary sunlight, then, may have an unexpectedly powerful effect that goes beyond mere heating. It may be that solar energy builds to order and separates charge between the near-surface exclusion zone and the bulk water beyond — the separation effectively creating a battery. This light-induced charge separation resembles the first step of photosynthesis. Indeed, this light-induced action would seem relevant not only for photosynthetic processes but also for all realms of nature involving water and interfaces.​

In conclusion, you can think of water as a battery. It’s excellent to absorb and store energy, and it’s good to transfer that energy from water molecule to water molecule (picture the ripples that happen when you drop a rock in a pond). The water molecules end up moving closer together to stabilize themselves; they become denser and more viscous and store energy in the form of a negative charge. This is EZ water. It’s like a charged battery — it’s carrying that valuable vibrational energy and is ready to deliver it. Using light therapy infrared devices from Kaiyan Medical, you can make your EZ water. The other alternative is to sunbathe naked under the sun, but that can lead you to sunburns, so we suggest our devices.

How Light Therapy Enhances Physical Therapy Treatment

Though laser technology started with Albert Einstein, the technology didn’t evolve until the 1960’s when a laser prototype at Hughes Research Laboratories in Malibu, California, was first built. However, its purpose wasn’t for the medical industry; instead, for the military.

It eventually trickled down into Hollywood when Sci-Fi directors realized its potential for visual effects. But, of course, it didn’t take long for other fields to jump on the laser light bandwagon, including the medicine and rehabilitation industries. From there, the medical industry began to understand laser light’s impact on the human body when it came to healing and recovery.

Low-level (light) laser therapy (LLLT) is used to treat various conditions, including pain relief and inflammation. Over the past ten years, research and technological advancements have fine-tuned low-level light therapy, making the treatment highly effective in providing pain relief and healing treatment.

What is Low-Level Laser Light Therapy?

Before we talk about its capabilities, it’s essential to understand how it functions. Low-level laser light therapy is a non-invasive technique that gives the body a low dose of light to stimulate cellular healing. Laser light therapy targets the specific area in need to increase mobility by reducing pain and inflammation.

Low-level laser light therapy works through a process called photobiomodulation. During this process, the light is absorbed by the body’s tissue, where the cells respond with a physiological reaction, promoting cellular regeneration. The light stimulates cellular metabolism to promote cell growth and the healing of damaged cells.

How Laser Light Affects the Body

There are a couple of ways laser light therapy affects the body. Here’s what laser light therapy does for the body:

  1. Light energy is absorbed by melanin, hemoglobin, and water. The energy dissolves into heat, creating a soothing and warm sensation. The warming sensation helps patients feel relaxed.
  2. There’s an increase in ATP production in the mitochondria through light energy, the cell’s powerhouse. With increased ATP production, more energy is available for the healing process.
  3. Light energy aids with the release of nitric oxide, which enhances the circulation of damaged tissue. Increased circulation allows for improved oxygen exchange, nutrient exchange, and waste removal.
  4. Light energy releases crucial chemicals that help reduce inflammation.

So can laser light therapy be used alongside physical therapy? The answer is yes. In fact, the two treatments complement each other perfectly.

The Perfect Pair: Laser Light Therapy and Physical Therapy

With patients experiencing chronic or acute pain, the feeling of pain isn’t the main issue. However, patients can reduce pain and inflammation symptoms through laser light therapy while undergoing physical therapy treatments. Laser light therapy is ideal for pre and post-surgical procedures and during rehabilitation.

Patients undergoing laser light therapy will feel warm and soothing healing sensations as well as an immediate reduction in pain after treatment. By reducing pain, patients will improve their physical therapy performance and reduce their healing time. Ideally, four to six laser light therapy sessions are recommended to patients to receive the best results.

Whether you’re looking to improve your chiropractic, dermatology, medical or physical therapy practice, laser light therapy can provide your patients with the extra care they need to reduce chronic or acute pain and inflammation symptoms.

With many laser light products on the market, you want to make sure you’re investing in a medical-grade laser light device for your practice. Kaiyan Medical manufactures MDA-certified and FDA-approved laser light therapy devices, ideal for various medical and rehabilitation industries.

Sinus Infections & Low-level Laser Therapy

Sinus infections are inflammation based. Sinusitis is when inflammation is chronic, and the body is unable to overcome it. Sinusitis or sinus infections may be acute (coming on suddenly) or chronic (long-lasting & nothing seems to fix it.

There are sinus cavities above the eyebrows, behind the nose, and under the cheekbones. When the mucus membranes within the sinuses become inflamed, mucus is generated. Sometimes even air is trapped, which puts pressure on the walls of the sinus cavities, making our face hurt, causing difficulty in breathing thru the nose — this is called sinusitis.

Studies have shown that 37 million people per year in the US are affected with sinusitis at one time or another involving all age brackets.

Is There a Natural, Safer Treatment Option?

Some people immediately run to a doctor wanting antibiotics, which may not help since not all sinusitis is due to bacteria. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been proven effective in enabling the body to overcome inflammation. Many of our patients find that when they use low light Laser Therapy to treat their sinus infections, they experience two things: First — patients notice a significant difference after 1 treatment (breathing easier and sinus drainage); Second — they are less likely to get recurring infections, as is often the case when taking antibiotics.

Irradiation of red light penetrates several millimeters into tissue; in the infrared part of the spectrum, the penetration goes up to several centimeters, usually 4–6 cm. This is a very advantageous fact for treating sinusitis, for laser irradiation can be applied externally. However, when applying a red laser, it is necessary to introduce a light guide in the sinus.

Laser therapy is a safe, painless, non-invasive, and effective therapy to reduce pain and swelling, allowing the body to restore damaged tissue. Laser therapy uses red and infrared light to relieve pain and accelerate healing and decrease inflammation. When the light source is placed against the skin, the photons penetrate several centimeters and get absorbed by the mitochondria, the cell’s energy-producing cells part. This energy fuels many positive physiological responses resulting in the restoration of normal cell function. Laser therapy offers our bodies the opportunity to heal with no side effects and no long term damage.

Long Term/Cumulative Effects of Laser Therapy:

  • Improved resistance to infections
  • The immune response is stimulated
  • Reduction in swelling
  • Lymphatic drainage is improved
  • The body’s natural healing process is enhanced

LLLT irradiation is a benefit for the treatment of acute sinusitis. External irradiation with a laser with 830 nm wavelength, enabling the beam to penetrate 4–6 cm deep, is recommended. Irradiation with red light-emitting lasers is also effective. Still, due to the need for application through a light guide inserted into the cavity, this method has been discarded from clinical practice.

Laser irradiation works through its analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and biostimulation effects on ease of pain or elimination. It also causes a quicker withdrawal of inflammation and edema of the mucosa. It thus brings restoration of drainage of sines as well as normalization of mucociliary function. Immunomodulatory effect — improvement of both specific and non-specific immunities by stimulation of T and B lymphocytes, lysozyme, and phagocytosis — is also significant. Stimulation of Langerhans cells of the mucose of sines is presumed, too.

Laser irradiation in treating sinusitis has no contraindications (except for general contraindications, i.e., malignant tumors in the irradiation area or epilepsy). As physiotherapy, it can suitably complement therapy with antibiotics, mucolytics, and antihistaminics. The use of a laser with 830 nm wavelength appears to be the most beneficiary on diagnosis sinusitis acute with liquid levels in paranasal sinuses, the treatment of which was cut down by 59 percent in average, and on a group of patients with plain catarrhal obscure and decreased transparency (the most frequent) where the duration of therapy was shortened by 39 percent.

By using red light therapy devices from Kaiyan Medical, you’re able to reduce sinus inflammation and improve your immune system by investing a few minutes using a red light device.

Pro Athletes Harnessing the Power of Red Light

Originally from https://www.lunaspanel.com/post/pro-athletes-harnessing-the-power-of-red-light


Being a professional athlete is no joke, and when your body is a central part of your job, it needs to be very well taken care of. And even when athletes are doing all the right things to take care of their body, injuries are still widespread in professional sports; but it used to be that their career was over if an athlete was injured. But now, athletes can undergo surgery and pop back up on the court or field months later. How is that possible?

As most athletes know, a large portion of time is dedicated to repairing muscles and alleviating inflammation for the next game. Regardless of the sport, teams spend millions of dollars on professional physical therapists to guarantee their athletes receive the highest physical treatment standard.

The recovery process for an athlete is essential and a determining factor of how well they’ll perform during their careers. You’ll often hear the words “optimizing performance” when discussing the recovery process for athletes. Today, the recovery process isn’t just to heal an athlete but to naturally enhance their performance.

So, how do professional therapists optimize professional athletes’ performance and recovery? Well, red light therapy is turning out to be one of the most effective treatments for these high-performing individuals.

Professional trainers are always looking for natural ways to enhance their player’s performance. With light has proven to be a lead modality, many trainers and athletes use light therapy to enhance the body’s natural healing process. But how does it work?

When used, natural red light penetrates the skin and cells. When the light reaches the mitochondria, it stimulates the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). ATP is a natural energy currency in the human body. With an enhanced ATP production, cells in the muscle are optimized and repaired faster.

Hundreds of peer-reviewed clinical trials have backed up the results athletes see on the courts and fields. In 2015, researchers conducted a meta-analysis of placebo-controlled trials, and the results were astounding. They found that most clinical trials showed “significant improvement for the main measures related to performance,” including endurance and speed. And through this meta-analysis, it was concluded that “phototherapy (with lasers and LEDs) improves muscular performance and accelerates recovery when applied before exercise.”

However, red light therapy does more than recover muscle tissue. It also increases muscle strength, ultimately improving physical performance.

A 2016 study researched red light therapy on elite athletes and trained and untrained athletes. What was found was that red light therapy after training could increase muscle mass. So, not only does red light therapy accelerate the recovery process, but it also improves muscle strength.

But what about endurance? Being strong is only one aspect of being an athlete. Endurance is crucial when competing against an opponent. A triple-blind, placebo-controlled trial published in 2018 studied the effects of red light therapy on men and women undergoing endurance training on treadmills. It was found that red light therapy pre-exercise can “increase the time-to-exhaustion and oxygen uptake and also decrease the body fat in healthy volunteers when compared to placebo.”

Another study from 2018 completed by Brazilian researchers found that after their randomized, triple-blind, placebo-controlled trial on pro soccer players, those who underwent red light therapy stayed longer on the playing field. It was concluded that light therapy “…had a significant improvement in all the biochemical markers evaluated…pre-exercise [light] therapy can enhance performance and accelerate recovery…”.

Peer-reviewed clinical trials worldwide have all concluded the same thing: red light therapy works for increasing athletic performance levels. Luna’s red light therapy device can help professional athletes and the rest of us exercise regularly, recover from injuries, and improve our physical and muscular health.

Laser Acupuncture Treatment?

Acupuncture under traditional Chinese medicine is an alternative medicine that treats patients by needle insertion and manipulation at acupoints (APS) in the body. Acupuncture causes collagen fiber contraction, resulting in soluble actin polymerization and actin stress fiber formation, affecting the nervous and immune systems. Besides, acupuncture leads to molecular changes at APs in tissues at the cellular level. The local physicochemical reactions at the APs send signals to the organs via the tissue fluid and blood circulatory systems for optimal adjustment of the body’s organs.

It is believed to have been practiced for more than 2500 years, and this modality is among the oldest healing practices in the world. Acupuncture is based on the idea that living beings have Qi, defined as inner energy, and that it is an imbalance in Qi or interruption in the flow of Qi that causes illness and disease. Acupuncture therapy is focused on rebalancing the flow of Qi, and the practice is progressively gaining credibility as a primary or adjuvant therapy by Western medical providers.

Laser Acupuncture

Kaiyan Medical has been working to create ergonomic laser pens to simulate the acupuncture process. Laser acupuncture (LA) — non-thermal, low-intensity laser irradiation to stimulate acupuncture points — has become more common among acupuncture practitioners in recent years. LA is a safer, pain-free alternative to traditional acupuncture, with minimal adverse effects and greater versatility. LA has many features that make it an attractive option as a treatment modality, including minimal sensation, short duration of treatment, and minimal risks of infection, trauma, and bleeding complications.

What is the Difference

In acupuncture, needles are inserted at specific acupoints, which may be manually stimulated in various ways, including gentle twisting or up-and-down movements. Besides, the depth of needle penetration is also manipulated by the acupuncture practitioner. The patient may report sensations of De Qi, which are feelings of pressure, warmth, or tingling in the superficial layers of the skin. Many theories to explain how acupuncture works have been proposed, including the gate-control theory of pain and the endorphin-and-neurotransmitter. Others have postulated that acupuncture modulates the transmission of pain signals and alters the release of endogenous endorphins and neurotransmitters, resulting in physiologic changes.

One clear difference between needle acupuncture and LA is that LA does not physically penetrate the skin. Despite a greater understanding of LA, it is unclear how non-thermal, low-intensity laser irradiation stimulates acupoints. The mechanism of LA may be entirely separate from our present understanding of acupuncture. Current theories postulate that LLLT could positively affect modulating inflammation, pain, and tissue repair, given appropriate irradiation parameters.

Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Lasers

Inflammation reduction comparable to that of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has been reported with animal studies that used red and near-infrared LLLT, with laser outputs ranging from 2.5 to 100 mW and delivered energy doses ranging from 0.6 to 9.6 Joules. Human studies have shown similar anti-inflammatory effects with LLLT, which may account for many associated positive clinical results.

Cellular Effects of LLLT

LLLT improves cell physiology by increasing the overall cell redox potential toward greater oxidation and increased reactive oxygen species while simultaneously decreasing reactive nitrogen species. These redox state changes activate numerous intracellular-signaling pathways, including nucleic acid synthesis, protein synthesis, enzyme activation, and cell cycle progression.17 LLLT also alters the expression of genes that can enhance cell growth and inhibit cell apoptosis.16 These cellular effects of LLLT might reflect its ability to induce long-term changes in cells and LLLT’s benefits for wound healing, nerve regeneration, and inflammation reduction.

LLLT Characteristics

Red and infrared laser wavelengths are absorbed by cytochrome C oxidase protein in the mitochondrial cell membranes. This absorption is associated with increased adenosine triphosphate production by the mitochondria, which. In turn, it increases intracellular calcium (Ca2+) and cyclic adenosine monophosphate, which serve as secondary messengers that aid in regulating multiple body processes, including signal transfer in nerves and gene expression.

The power density of a laser, defined as laser energy supplied per area (W/cm2), influences its energy penetration depth. A 50-mW laser with a beam size of 1 cm2 has an energy density of 0.05 W/cm2. In contrast, the same power laser with a beam size of 1 mm2 has an energy density of 5 W/cm2 — a higher energy density results in deeper energy penetration through the skin.

Energy transmission through the skin is also affected by the absorption of light energy by skin structures. Light wavelengths from 650 to 900 nm have the best penetration through the skin. Lower wavelengths are absorbed by melanin and hemoglobin, and wavelengths longer than 900 nm are absorbed by water. With a well-focused laser beam, red wavelengths (~ 648 nm) can penetrate 2–4 cm beneath the skin surface, and infrared wavelengths (~ 810 nm) can penetrate up to 6 cm.

Now Kaiyan has made LLLT easier to use. Kaiyan medical devices can treat multiple acupoints simultaneously at the same time.


Red Light Therapy and Sun Damage

When summer rolls around, we all head outside, absorbing as many rays as we can. And the proof is in the numbers, with the top five summertime activities being barbeques, going to the beach, attending festivals, going for a hike, and exploring nature. When the sun comes out, people flock to the outdoors with good reason. We need the sun’s rays to survive.

However, many of us go a little overboard. Some lather on tanning oil or skip sunscreen to make sure we receive as much pigmentation as possible. And yes, we need vitamin D, but overexposure leads to sun damage, including sunspots and wrinkles.

However, it doesn’t end there. Neglectful sun exposure can also lead to skin cancer. While the damage has already been done from years of sunbathing and tanning oils, there are ways we can repair sun-damaged skin, reduce wrinkles and sunspots.

It can help repair the sun damage done to our skin and turn back the clock with red light therapy.

What is Sun Damage?

In the end, skin damage comes from overexposure to ultraviolet (UV) light. When we sunbathe, our skin naturally responds to the sun by protecting itself from UV light. What does our body do? Well, it produces melanin, which darkens the skin to reflect the UV light. So your summer tan is actually a defense mechanism. There are a few different types of sun damage to be aware of:

Melasma: It’s an overproduction of melanin that causes brown or gray patches to form on the skin.

Wrinkles: UV light breaks down the collagen and elastin in the skin, losing its firmness and causing wrinkles.

Sunburn: Sunburns are an inflammatory reaction to UV radiation damage to the skin. The body responds by repairing or removing the damaged cells, which results in redness and peeling.

Sun Spots: Overexposure to UV rays causes an increase of melanin production that builds up in clusters, producing dark spots on the skin.

Actinic Keratosis (AK): Causes a scaly patch of skin on the body from overexposure to UV light. This is particularly dangerous as around 10% of actinic keratosis becomes cancerous.

How Red Light Therapy Reverses Sun Damage

If you’re wondering whether sun damage is reversible or not, the answer is yes. Red light therapy uses infrared and red light to enhance the body’s healing process. Red light therapy increases the body’s collagen, elastin, and immune response; it can remove and repair dead or damaged skin cells.

By increasing collagen production, it’ll help smooth and firm the skin, reducing the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles. Besides, red light therapy also protects existing collagen, which helps keep the skin’s elasticity.

However, red light therapy doesn’t only reduce fine lines and wrinkles. It can also help with more serious skin conditions such as actinic keratosis. It can aid in removing actinic keratosis spots from the skin with photosensitizing medication and red light therapy.

Sun damage is the main cause of aging skin and can lead to serious health issues. Naturally, some sun damage forms cannot be treated, especially for those who work consistently outdoors. However, tackling sunspots, wrinkles, sunburns, and actinic keratosis is achievable through red light therapy treatment.

It’s important to point out that while red light therapy does reverse sun damage, it can prevent future damage — but you should always wear a broad-spectrum sunscreen when outdoors and reapply after swimming or sweating.

Reversing past mistakes are possible with light therapy, but we also want to look at the future. Luna’s red light therapy will tackle previous sun damage and rejuvenate the skin, while sunscreen will prevent future damage.

We hope you continue to enjoy the sun’s incredible rays safely while enjoying the incredible skincare results of Lunas light panels.

Lighting the Way Back for Astronauts - Light Therapy & NASA

In 1993, Quantum Devices, Inc. (QDI), of Barneveld, Wisconsin, began developing the HEALS (High Emissivity Aluminiferous Light-emitting Substrate) technology high-intensity, solid-state LED lighting systems for NASA Space Shuttle plant growth experiments. The company evolved out of cooperative efforts with the Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics (WCSAR) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison — a NASA center for the Commercial Development of Space. Ronald W. Ignatius, QDI’s president, and chairman represented one of WCSAR’s industrial partners at the time. WCSAR was conducting research on light sources for promoting food growth within closed environments where humans would be present for a long duration, such as the Space Shuttle and the International Space Station.

With the support of WCSAR, Ignatius experimented with LEDs, which provide high-energy efficiency and virtually no heat, despite releasing waves of light 10 times brighter than the Sun. Ignatius admits that some scientists involved in the project were skeptical at first, thinking that the idea of using LEDs to promote plant growth was far-fetched. However, the experiments demonstrated that red LED wavelengths could boost the energy metabolism of cells to advance plant growth and photosynthesis. This finding prompted Ignatius to develop a line of LED products that emit the exact wavelength of light that plants use in photosynthesis.

“Our company gives credit to Dr. Ray Bula, the director of WCSAR, for having the foresight to go against the prevailing dogma of the time and design the first plant experiment using monochromatic light to grow lettuce plants,” Ignatius proclaims.

In 1989, Ignatius formed QDI to bring the salt grain-sized LEDs to market. In October 1995, the light sources made their Space Shuttle flight debut on the second U.S. Microgravity Laboratory Spacelab mission (STS-73, Columbia).

Growing

When NASA determined that red LEDs could grow plants in space, Marshall Space Flight Center awarded QDI several Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts to investigate the broad-spectrum diodes' effectiveness in medical applications. The contracts, issued from 1995 to 1998, focused on increasing energy inside human cells. NASA hoped that the LEDs would yield medical benefits on Earth and stem bone and muscle mass loss in astronauts, which occurs during long periods of weightlessness. (In space, the lack of gravity keeps human cells from growing naturally.) Furthermore, since wounds are slow to heal in a microgravity environment, LED therapy could accelerate healing and keep what would be termed as minor wounds on Earth from becoming mission-catastrophic in space.

In addition to promoting cell growth, the red LEDs are capable of activating light-sensitive, tumor-treating drugs that, when injected intravenously, could destroy cancer cells while leaving surrounding tissue virtually untouched. The technique, approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in laboratory and human trials, is known as Photodynamic Therapy.

With the SBIR assistance from NASA, QDI set out to alter a surgical probe that could emit long waves of red light to stimulate a Benzoporphyrin-derivative drug called Photofrin, which delivers fewer post-operative side effects than comparable drugs. Ignatius also developed a friendly and successful working relationship with Dr. Harry Whelan, pediatric neurology and director of hyperbaric medicine at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. The two had met after Ignatius came across a newspaper article highlighting Whelan’s ground-breaking brain cancer surgery technique, which uses drugs stimulated by laser lights to accelerate healing. Accordingly, QDI provided more than $1.25 million from its SBIR contracts to support Whelan’s pioneering photobiomodulation research and bring him on board to help improve the surgical probe.

Collectively, Ignatius, Whelan, and researchers from NASA successfully altered the probe for pediatric brain tumors and the prevention of oral mucositis (a common side effect of chemotherapy and radiation treatments) in pediatric bone marrow transplant patients at the Medical College of Wisconsin. In May 1998, a 20-year-old female became the first patient to undergo surgery with the modified probe. The young woman had endured six brain surgeries and chemotherapy and radiation treatments over a span of 10 years, but her aggressive cancer kept coming back. Having exhausted all of her conventional treatment options, she turned to the NASA-sponsored Photodynamic Therapy technology.

During the procedure, surgeons excised as much of the recurring brain tumor as they could then injected the light-activated Photofrin into her bloodstream and inserted the LED probe into the remaining tumor tissue. The probe, which casts long wavelengths that generate less heat and penetrate deeper into tissue than the shorter wavelengths of traditional medical lasers, proved to be both safe and effective, as the tumor never returned, and the patient recovered with no complications. A second operation that took place 3 months later on a male patient was also deemed successful by Whelan and his Medical College of Wisconsin surgeons' team.

FDA-approved clinical trials continued at several other facilities over the next 3 years, including the Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, New York; Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke’s Medical Center in Chicago; and the Instituto de Oncologia Pediatrica in Sao Paulo, Brazil. QDI became recognized as a U.S. Space Foundation “Space Technology Hall of Fame” award recipient in 2000 and a Marshall Space Flight Center “Hallmark of Success” in 2004.

Product Outcome

The positive clinical trial results and continued support from NASA and follow-on research grants from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency helped QDI and the Medical College of Wisconsin fully transition space technology into a new, non-invasive medical device. The WARP 10 (Warfighter Accelerated Recovery by Photobiomodulation) is a high-intensity, hand-held, portable LED unit intended for the temporary relief of minor muscle and joint pain, arthritis, stiffness, and muscle spasms. It also promotes the relaxation of muscle tissue and increases local blood circulation. Unlike the surgical probe, the WARP 10 does not require intravenous medicine; instead, the unit can be placed directly on the skin where treatment is to occur.

The WARP 10 was designed to aid armed forces personnel on the front lines with immediate first aid care for minor injuries and pain, thereby improving combat endurance. The “soldier self-care” device produces 80 times more photon energy than a 250-Watt heat lamp, yet it remains cool to the touch. The power advantage reduces the time required for each therapeutic dose and provides for faster multi-dose exposures when needed, without the harmful effects of ultraviolet solar radiation. The U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. Navy are currently issuing WARP 10 to crews on submarines and Special Forces operations.

QDI has introduced an FDA-approved consumer version sharing the same power and properties of the military model as an alternative to the cost and complications associated with the overuse of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for persistent pain relief. According to a Mayo Clinic study, adverse events associated with the use of NSAIDs are reported more frequently to the FDA than such events associated with any other group of drugs. Furthermore, conservative calculations for the United States estimate that approximately 107,000 patients are hospitalized each year for NSAID-related gastrointestinal complications. At least 16,500 NSAID-related deaths occur annually among arthritis patients alone, according to compiled research.

References

Beauvoit B., Evans S.M., Jenkins T.W., Miller E.E., Chance B., “Contribution of the Mitochondrial Compartment to the OpticalProperties of the Rat Liver: A Theoretical and Practical Approach,” Analytical Biochemistry 226, 167-174 (1995).Beauvoit B., Kitai T., Chance B., “Correlation between the Light Scattering and the Mitochondrial Content of Normal Tissues andTransplantable Rodent Tumors,” Biophysical Journal 67, 2501-25 10 (1994).Chance B., Nioka S., Kent J., McCully K., Fountain M., Greenfield R., Holtom G., “Time-Resolved Spectroscopy of Hemoglobin andMyoglobin in Resting and Ischemic Muscle,” Analytical Biochemistry 174, 698-707 (1988)Conlan M.J., Rapley J.W., Cobb C.M., “Biostimulation of wound healing by low-energy laser irradiation,” J.Clin. Periodont. 23, 492-496 (1996).Eggert H.R., Blazek V., “Optical Properties of Normal Human Brain Tissues In The Spectral Range of 400 to 2500 nm,” Advances inExperimental Medicine & Biology 333, 47-55 (1993).Karu T., “Photochemical Effects Upon the Cornea, Skin and Other Tissues (Photobiology Of Low-Power Laser Effects,” HlthPhysics 56, 69 1-704 (1989).Lubart R., Friedman H., Sinyakov M., Cohen N., Breitbart H., “Changes in Calcium Transport in Mammalian Sperm Mitochondriaand Plasma Membranes Caused by 780 nm Irradiation,” Lasers in Surg & Med 21, 493-499 (1997).Lubart R., Wollman Y., Friedman H., Rochkind S. Laulicht L., “Effects of visible and near-infrared lasers on cell cultures,” Journalof Photochemistry & Photobiology 12(3), 305-3 10 (1992).Salansky N., “Low energy photon therapy for wound healing.” Intnl Med Instr, Canadian Defense Ministry, PersonalCommunication. (1998).Schmidt M.H., Bajic D.M., Reichert K.W. II, Martin T.S., Meyer G.A., Whelan H.T., “Light –emitting diodes as a light source forintra-operative photodynamic therapy.” Neurosurg 38(3), 552-556 (1996).Schmidt M.H., Reichert K.W. II, Ozker K., Meyer G.A., Donohoe D.L., Bajic D.M., Whelan N. T., Whelan H. T., “PreclinicalEvaluation of Benzoporphyrin Derivative Combined with a Light-Emitting Diode Array for Photodynamic Therapy ofBrain Tumors.” Pediatr Neurosurg 30, 225-231 (1999).Whelan H.T., Schmidt M.H., Segura A.D., McAuliffe T.L., Bajic D.M., Murray K.J., Moulder J.E., Strother D.R., Thomas J.P., MeyerG.A., “The role of photodynamic therapy in posterior fossa brain tumors: A pre-clinical study in a canine glioma model.”Journal of Neurosurgery 79(4), 562-8 (1993).5Whelan H.T., Houle J.M., Donohoe D.L., Bajic D.M., Schmidt M.H., Reichert K.W., Weyenberg G.T., Larson D.L., Meyer G.A.,Caviness J.A., “Medical Applications of Space Light-Emitting Diode Technology—Space Station and Beyond.” SpaceTech. & App Int’l Forum 458, 3-15 (1999).Yu W., Naim J.O., Lanzafame R.J., “The Effect Of Laser Irradiation On The Release Of bFGF From 3T3 Fibroblasts.”Photochemistry & Photobiology 59, 167-70 (1994).

How Red Light Therapy Combats Arthritis Pain & Stiffness

When it comes to muscle and joint stiffness, osteoarthritis, and arthritis, the one thing in common is pain and inflammation. When suffering from joint and muscular conditions, a person’s range of motion decreases, and swelling and skin redness increase, making everyday tasks a struggle.

Many young to middle-aged people are unaware of these conditions as they’ve been labeled as conditions mainly for the elderly; however, things have changed.

Though these conditions are common within the elderly community, we’re seeing an increase among young adults. In the United States alone, 23% of adults — over 53 million people — have arthritis, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In other words, joint pain isn’t just for old age, as we once thought.

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) appears in every 8 in 100,000 people between 18 and 34 years old. Of course, no one — young or old — wants to wake up feeling joint stiffness, swelling, or pain every morning.

However, the old myth that arthritis is untreatable is about to be debunked with light therapy.

Naturally, a medical professional will have to make a conclusive arthritis diagnosis. However, once diagnosed, many people find home treatments to deal with the pain — like light therapy. And the people who are undergoing light therapy are receiving incredible pain relief from their treatment. For example, a study published in the Turkish Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation found that infrared light treatment on inflammatory arthritis of the spine (spondylitis) encouraged increased function and improved quality of life for participants.

But what’s the science behind red light therapy treating joint conditions? Red light therapy uses low levels of red light to stimulate a natural response to cell performance. The light penetrates through the layers of the dermis, entering the muscles and nerves. As the cells absorb the energy, they become more active, with increased blood flow to the treated area, promoting cell regrowth and regeneration. Through this combination of increased blood flow and cellular activity, it rapidly reduces inflammation and pain.

With the recent advancements in modern technology, those who have arthritis or other joint conditions no longer need to opt for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or corticosteroids. These forms of the medication come with serious side effects such as edema, heartburn, stomach ulcers, cataracts, bone loss, and elevated blood clots. This alternative non-invasive treatment allows people to choose a drug-free treatment that reduces swelling, inflammation, and pain through red light therapy.

A study published in the National Library of Medicine found that elderly patients who underwent red and infrared therapy treatment had reduced their pain by 50%. Besides, they found participants who underwent red and infrared light therapy had a significant improvement in function. Another study from 2016 saw a substantial reduction in pain and an increased range of motion after five to seven red light therapy treatments for Bouchard’s and Heberden’s osteoarthritis. These studies are only a few examples of how red light therapy shows results as an effective treatment.

A little red light can go a long way for your body, mind, and soul. More and more people recognize the benefits of red light therapy as a natural home treatment. For people suffering from any joint condition, red light therapy will reduce inflammation, eliminating joint and muscle pain.

But there’s more to red light therapy than this. It’s important to be reminded that light therapy also heals other ailments in the body. Red light therapy is effective for injuries, muscle recovery, cancer side effects, skincare, and depression.

With an FDA-approved and MDA-certified Lunas red light therapy device, users can achieve optimal therapeutic results by merely exposing their bare skin to the light for a few minutes per day. Healing yourself doesn’t need a lot of time or money; you need the right tools. Lunas light therapy devices have the power to heal bodies and minds all around the world.

Red Light Therapy and Quarantine

If there’s one thing most of us likely haven’t had enough of in 2020, it’s natural light. The pandemic has changed our lives in so many ways, particularly concerning the drastic increase in the amount of time spent indoors and home. Most of us are stationed at our computers all day, only to log off just in time for dinner. At that point, it’s already dark, and we’re likely ready to decompress and relax.

Throw a lockdown on top of this, and we’re lucky if we even get to see the sky that day.

Our current lifestyle, specifically in quarantine, makes natural daylight a rare sight, and this can be extremely detrimental to our mental and physical health — but why?

Without a sufficient amount of light, your circadian rhythm becomes out of sync, as does our hormone production levels. And if you’ve been experiencing poor sleep, lack of light is likely the reason why. A study from the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine found that employees who work near windows receive twice as much sunlight as those who don’t receive natural light — they also receive 46 more minutes of sleep on average.

So: darkness isn’t the determiner of sleep; rather, light is.

It’s clear how our daily routines have become more indoors-bound, yet there seems to be no way to reduce these light-limiting circumstances. The lack of sleep disrupted hormones, and constant uncertainty has a severe effect on our bodies, which we’re all experiencing during this time. So, how do we overcome these health concerns with limited options?

This is where red light therapy plays a crucial role in improving health. With the average American spending 90 percent of their time indoors, red light therapy allows you to receive light in your own environment. But just because we’re staying at home due to quarantine doesn’t mean we can’t supplement the natural light we need.

Red light therapy works by increasing energy production at a cellular level. The more energy our cells produce, the better our bodies feel as there’s sufficient blood flow. However, there’s more to it than just feeling good.

For people working in front of the computer all day, carpal tunnel syndrome, muscle fatigue, and arthritis are serious concerns. And since we’re working from home, our screen time has significantly increased. Red light therapy can also alleviate these issues by increasing circulation, repairing tissue, and relieving stiffness.

And while some may have received more natural light during quarantine in the summer, winter is right around the corner. During the winter months, Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) affects around 5% of people in general. However, with quarantine, these numbers are increasing. Thankfully, SAD symptoms can be significantly reduced, as light therapy mimics the sun’s light.

With COVID-19, it’s also incredibly difficult to manage mental and emotional health with the current circumstances. Before quarantine, if someone was stressed, they could reduce their symptoms by working out, going to yoga class, or enjoying nature with friends. But these activities have been either eliminated or significantly reduced. So, the reality is that we’re sitting at home all day, stressed, overworked, and fatigued.

Red light therapy is a game-changer for mitigating stress levels, as light cultivates calmness within the body. And since light therapy aids with cell production, it helps the body bounce back after experiencing stress or illness. In these times, red light therapy can aid with stress and help people recover from COVID-19 by reducing lung inflammation, pneumonia, and other acute respiratory disorders.

So although the quarantine presents many new challenges, we can be empowered to control our own health and wellness during these times. At Lunas, we’re passionate about helping people achieve their balance and intend to have our light panels in homes around the world, particularly during this challenging period. We hope to help everyone around the world find their light — literally!



The Sun and Us

Nothing is more important to us on Earth than the Sun. Without the Sun’s heat and light, the Earth would be a lifeless ball of ice-coated rock. The Sun warms our seas, stirs our atmosphere, generates our weather patterns, and gives energy to the growing green plants that provide the food and oxygen for life on Earth.

We know the Sun through its heat and light, but other, less obvious aspects of the Sun affect Earth and society. Energetic atomic particles and X-rays from solar flares and other disturbances on the Sun often affect radio waves traveling the Earth’s ionosphere, causing interference and even blackouts of long-distance radio communications. Disturbances of the Earth’s magnetic field by solar phenomena sometimes induce huge voltage fluctuations in power lines, threatening to blackout cities. Even such seemingly unrelated activities as the flight of homing pigeons, transatlantic cable traffic, and the control of oil flow in the Alaska pipeline apparently are interfered with by magnetic disturbances caused by events on the Sun. Thus, understanding these changes — and the solar events that cause them — is important for scientific, social, and economic reasons.

We have long recognized the importance of the Sun and watched it closely. Primitive people worshiped the Sun and were afraid when it would disappear during an eclipse. Since the early seventeenth century, scientists have studied it with telescopes, analyzing the light and heat that manage to penetrate our absorbing, turbulent atmosphere. Finally, we have launched solar instruments and ourselves-into space to view the Sun and its awesome eruptions in every aspect.

Once we looked at the Sun by the visible light that reached the ground, it seemed an average, rather stable star. It was not exactly constant, but it seemed to vary in a fairly regular fashion, with a cycle of sunspots that comes and goes in about eleven years. Now the Space Age has given us an entirely different picture of the Sun. We have seen the Sun in other forms of light-ultra violet, X-rays, and gamma rays that never reach the ground from space. This radiation turns out to be far more responsive to flare eruptions and other so-called solar activity.

We now see the Sun as a place of violent disturbances, with wild and sudden movements above and below its visible surface. Besides, solar activity's influence seems to extend to much greater distances than we had believed possible. New studies of long series of historical records reveal that the Sun has varied in the past in strange and unexplained ways. Scientists wonder how such variations might affect the future climate on Earth.

We have obtained a clearer picture of the scope of the Sun’s effects. Its magnetic field stretches through interplanetary space to the outer limits of the solar system. Steady streams and intense storms of atomic particles blow outward from the Sun, often encountering our Earth's atmospheres and the other planets. The spectacular photos of the Earth from space show only part of the picture. Instruments carried on satellites reveal a wide variety of invisible phenomena — lines of magnetic force, atomic particles, electric currents, and a huge geocorona of hydrogen atoms — surrounding the Earth. Each is as complex and changing as the visible face of the globe. The Earth’s magnetic field extends tens of thousands of miles into space, and many different streams of electrons and protons circulate within it. Huge electric currents flow around the Earth, affecting their high-altitude surroundings as well as our environment at ground level.

Space observations have greatly expanded our ability to look at the Sun, interplanetary space, and the Earth's immediate surroundings. We can now “see” many phenomena that are completely undetectable from the Earth’s surface, and we now have a much better, more complete, and more coherent picture of how events in one part of our solar system relate to activity in another.

The Sun as a Star

We sometimes forget that there is one star that is easily visible in the day time: our Sun. The Sun is the only star close enough to be studied in detail, but we are confident that all the processes in the Sun must also occur in billions of distant stars throughout the universe. To understand the nature and behavior of other stars, we must first understand our own. At the same time, observations of other kinds of stars help put the Sun in perspective.

The Sun is a relatively typical star among the approximately 100 billion stars in our Milky Way galaxy. The masses of most other stars that we see range from approximately one-tenth of the mass of the Sun to about 30 solar masses. The surface temperatures of most stars range from about 2000° C to 40,000° C. Although the Sun is somewhat on the cool side at about 6000° C, hot stars are rare, and most normal stars are cooler than the Sun. Compared to some of the explosive stars — novae, and supernovae — which sometimes appear in the sky, the Sun is stable and ordinary.

This long-term stability of our Sun probably was crucial for the development of life on Earth. Biologists believe that a relatively stable average temperature had to prevail on Earth during the past 3 billion years for life to evolve to its present state. The relative stability of the Sun is also important to astronomers trying to understand the basic nature of it and other stars. Violent activity in the Sun could mask the more subtle and long-enduring processes, which are the basic energy transport mechanisms of our star. Fortunately, they are not hidden, and we have been able to map the trend in solar properties with height above the visible surface.

Above the minimum temperature region in the photosphere, we have measured how the gas gets hotter as it thins out with height. The chromosphere and corona, each hotter than the layer below, are warmed by the transfer of energy from below through processes that are still not well understood.

Until space observations became possible, we knew nothing about coronae in any other stars and had only marginal information about stellar chromospheres' properties. Now, space observations have shown us that a large fraction of the stars in the sky have chromospheres and coronae.

On several dozen stars, we have even detected activity that may be connected with sunspot (or “starspot”) cycles like those of our own Sun. X-ray telescopes carried on satellites have recorded flares in other stars that are far more powerful than the already impressive flares of the Sun. By observing the strength and frequency of these events on stars with masses, ages, and rotation rates which differ from those of the Sun, we search for answers to such basic questions as: “How does the sunspot cycle period depend on the star’s rotation rate?” or “What is the relation between the temperature of a star’s corona and the strength of its magnetic field?” By deciphering the general pattern of stellar properties, we can better understand what makes things happen on the Sun.

The Sun presents us with a bewildering variety of surface features, atmospheric structures, and active phenomena. Sunspots come and go. The entire Sun shakes and oscillates in several different ways at the same time. Great eruptions called prominences hang high above the Sun’s surface for weeks, suspended by magnetic force, and sometimes shoot abruptly into space from the corona. The explosions called solar flares emit vast amounts of radiation and atomic particles in short periods of time, often with little or no warning.

Space observations have discovered many new aspects of solar events hidden from ground-based observatories—the Sunshine's hottest spots primarily in ultraviolet and X-rays, rather than in visible light. Thus, only from space can we map high-temperature solar flares' true structure and determine their physical conditions. Space observatories have shown us the higher, hotter layers of the Sun’s atmosphere that normally are invisible from the ground. Instruments on satellites revealed that in flares and other violent disturbances, the Sun acts like an atomic accelerator, driving electrons and protons to velocities approaching the speed of light. At such high speeds, the particles emit the high-energy X-rays and gamma rays measured by our satellites. Sometimes they even induce nuclear reactions on the surface of the Sun.

Two aspects of our improved knowledge of the Sun deserve special attention. One is the role of magnetic fields in determining virtually all aspects of the Sun’s upper atmosphere's structure and behavior. The other is discovering the solar wind, a stream of atomic particles that constantly evaporate from the Sun’s atmosphere and are accelerated to speeds of hundreds of kilometers per second, escaping into space in all directions.

The Earth-Sun Battle

For any solar particle to reach the Earth, it must first pass through the Earth’s magnetic field. Before the solar wind was discovered, the Earth’s field was thought to be symmetrical, resembling a huge bar magnet, fading off indefinitely into space. However, we now know that the solar wind shapes the Earth’s magnetic field's outer regions and is sharply bounded. Outside the boundary, space is dominated by the solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field. Inside the boundary is the region or magnetosphere dominated by the Earth’s magnetic field. The measurements from many space missions have been combined to reveal that the solar wind blows out the Earth’s magnetosphere into a teardrop shape. The head of the drop extends only about 10 Earth radii, or about 65,000 kilometers (40,000 miles) “upwind” toward the Sun. The tail of the drop stretches away in the direction opposite the Sun, actually reaching beyond the Moon’s orbit. This long magnetotail extends more than 600,000 kilometers (370,000 miles) from the Earth.

At the boundary of the magnetosphere, there is a constant struggle between the Earth's magnetic field and the forces of the Sun. Buffeted by fluctuations in the solar wind velocity and density, the magnetosphere’s size and shape are continuously changing. When the solar wind strikes the magnetosphere, shock waveforms are analogous to the sonic boom preceding a supersonic airplane. Inside the boundary with the solar wind, the magnetosphere remains an active region. It contains two belts of very energetic charged atomic particles trapped in the Earth’s magnetic field hundreds of miles above the atmosphere. These belts were discovered by Professor James Van Allen of the University of Iowa and his colleagues in 1958, using simple radiation detectors carried by Explorer 1, the first U.S. satellite.

The Northern and Southern Lights: Gifts from the Sun

The structure of the Earth’s magnetosphere also controls aurorae's behavior, seen in our night skies. Pre-Space Age textbooks stated that aurorae are produced by photons emitted from the Sun and reach the Earth’s upper atmosphere through gaps in the Earth’s magnetic field at the north and south magnetic poles. According to the theory, these protons strike oxygen atoms in the atmosphere, and the collisions cause the glow, which we call the Northern Lights.

This view has changed in the Space Age. The data collected by many spacecraft showed that the situation is more complicated. Particles from both the solar wind and from the Earth’s atmosphere apparently are stored in the magnetotail. From there, they periodically are violently ejected into the northern and southern polar regions of the atmosphere along the Earth’s magnetic field. They are accelerated to high speeds by a process not yet fully explained. The magnetotail is, in effect, a reservoir of particles that is periodically refilled. When the Sun is active during maximum sunspot years, this process is especially intense and frequent, and the aurorae are brighter and move closer to the equator.

Stroke Incidents & Red Light Therapy

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 800,000 stroke incidents occur every year. No two-stroke incidents are the same. Stroke patients suffer complications such as loss of motor skills or partial paralysis on one side of the body.

A person can feel excruciating muscle pain, contractions for long periods of time, or spasms during the recovery process. This muscle tightness is known as spasticity or hypertonia. Sometimes patients experience muscle weakness down one side of the body, known as hemiparesis. One of the best treatments for muscle spasticity and strengthening muscle function is physical therapy.

The recovery process is dependent on the continued movement of the affected muscles. For example, some patients are known to keep their affected shoulder tense due to pain from the arm remaining relaxed and hanging. This leads to more complications, pain, and tightness. Everyday tasks such as lifting a fork, sweeping a floor, or driving a car can feel impossible for some. While pain is felt in the shoulder, arm, or leg muscles — these muscles are mostly healthy. It is the brain circuits and nerves between the brain's connection to these body parts that are damaged and need to be strengthened. Often, stroke patients do not find relief from even the strongest pain medication. Regardless, stimulating the muscles and pained areas with physical therapy strengthens the brain's connection and generates the healing process.

The National Library of Medicine has shared a study conducted in 2016 on stroke patients and red light therapy. The study concluded that red light therapy “may contribute to increased recruitment of muscle fibers and, hence, to increase the onset time of the spastic muscle fatigue, reducing pain intensity in stroke patients with spasticity, as has been observed in healthy subjects and athletes.” Another study from The National Library of Medicine on the effect of Photobiomodulation by red light-emitting diodes (LEDs) on nerve regeneration concluded with positive results. It was found in 2010 that “red to near-infrared LEDs have been shown to promote mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. In this study, LED irradiation improved nerve regeneration and increased antioxidation levels in the chamber fluid. Therefore, we propose that antioxidation induced by LEDs may be conducive to nerve regeneration.” Red light therapy works well to stimulate mitochondrial functions in cells and nerves. It can stimulate recovery 4 to 10 times faster than your body’s natural healing process.

Physical therapy is necessary for stroke patients, and when paired with full-body red light therapy, there is the potential to assist efforts towards pain reduction significantly. Photobiomodulation or red light therapy stimulates cells and helps repair the myelin sheath covering nerve fibers to accelerate their healing process and can have a positive effect on repairing broken neural pathways in the brain disrupted by stroke incidents.

In Kaiyan Medical, we develop all types of light therapy devices. We believe in the holistic approach to balance your body.

References

https://www.stroke.org.uk/sites/default/files/pain_after_stroke.pdf

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27299571/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20358337/#:~:text=Red%20to%20near%2Dinfrared%20LEDs,be%20conducive%20to%20nerve%20regeneration.

Story - Green Light for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

Paul Hamernik says that “green light” laser surgery has meant he can enjoy his life again. As a stock car racer, Paul Hamernik thought his frequent restroom breaks were an occupational hazard. He accepted that his bladder was small, and his nerves ran wild — until he learned his PSA level was increasing.

“PSA, or prostate-specific antigen, is a normal substance produced by the prostate, usually found in an increased amount in the blood of men who have prostate cancer, infection or inflammation of the prostate, and benign prostatic hyperplasia,” explains Lance Mynderse, M.D., a urologist at Mayo Clinic in Rochester.

“My local doctor suggested I go to Mayo and be evaluated,” says Paul. “He said Mayo had advanced tests and procedures to diagnose and treat prostate conditions that weren’t widely available.”

Fortunately, Paul didn’t have prostate cancer. But, because of his age and PSA level, the clinic invited him to participate in a pharmaceutical trial studying the effect of dutasteride in preventing prostate cancer in men with elevated PSA levels.

“I didn’t know anything about the drug, but I wanted to help advance medical science, so I decided to enroll,” says Paul. “I’ve always been proactive with my health. That’s why I started having my PSA tested early.”

During the four-year, double-blind study, Paul took a medicine — the drug or a placebo — every day. Half-way through the study, he had a prostate biopsy and urine flow analysis.

“I remember having an ultrasound on my bladder after emptying it,” recalls Paul. “The technician thought the ultrasound machine wasn’t working, and she went to get help.”

The equipment was working, and what the technician initially saw proved accurate. Paul’s bladder was holding three times the amount of urine that it should. It had become distended, and he was unable to empty it.

“If I hadn’t been in this clinical trial, being monitored the way I was, this urine flow problem probably would not have been diagnosed until after my kidneys were involved,” says Paul.

“Paul’s bladder problem was caused by an enlarged prostate, which often leads to bladder outlet obstruction and restriction of urine flow,” says Dr. Mynderse. “Paul’s condition was benign prostatic hyperplasia or BPH — a natural aging process that happens in all men.” While all men experience BPH, not all have symptoms — and certainly not as severe as Paul.

This clinical trial identified a problem that normal healthcare wouldn’t have found since Paul didn’t have any complaints, and a urine flow analysis wouldn’t normally be done. Unfortunately, Paul wasn’t a candidate for surgery when his enlarged prostate was diagnosed because his bladder had lost function. “When the bladder becomes that enlarged, it loses much of its elasticity and squeeze,” explains Dr. Mynderse.

At that point, reducing the size of the prostate might not help, as the bladder still can’t empty if it’s not capable of squeezing, even when you eliminate the prostate obstruction. “Therefore, we needed to ensure bladder function would return before scheduling surgery,” says Dr. Mynderse.

What this meant for Paul was regular self-catheterization five times per day. “I was terribly bummed,” says Paul. “First, it’s challenging to find a sterile environment & many places aren’t accommodating.” Paul’s employer offered a special restroom, and he learned some other tricks that helped but didn’t change his situation.

“I ended up clinically depressed because the catheter interfered with my ability to race stock cars, which I’ve done almost all my life,” says Paul. “There’s no support group for catheters, and I felt alone and very odd.”

“Going green” with surgery.

Paul’s diligence paid off. “His bladder function returned, and we were able to schedule a special surgery called photoselective vaporization of the prostate or PVP,” says Dr. Mynderse.

This surgery is often called green light laser surgery because it emits a highly visible green light. “The green light is created by lithium triborate, a chemical used as the lasing medium,” says Dr. Mynderse.

Mayo Clinic urologists pioneered the use of laser energy to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia in the 90s. In fact, Mayo’s Department of Urology is the” green light” laser's birthplace to treat BPH. Today, Mayo Clinic is only one of a handful of medical centers in the U.S. that are considered “Centers of Excellence” using PVP laser therapy to treat BPH.

“During the surgery, we vaporize the prostate through an instrument placed down the urethra, called transurethral — and there’s no cutting,” explains Dr. Mynderse. “We direct the light on the inner surface of the prostate, and there’s minimal bleeding. The by-products of the light energy interaction with the prostate and hemoglobin are bubbles and fine debris.”

Imagine the prostate as an orange. The laser vaporizes or shrinks the fruit or tissue occupying the core and leaves the rind intact. The procedure is performed on an outpatient basis, under anesthesia. “After 12 hours, we remove the catheter, and the patient can urinate immediately,” says Dr. Mynderse. “This is a significant shift in inpatient treatment from the historical standard TURP method.”

Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) has been the gold standard surgical treatment for enlarged prostate for decades. However, up to 25% of patients experience complications after TURP, including excessive bleeding, urinary incontinence, and sexual impotence. TURP also subjects patients to risks inherent in any surgical procedure and a hospital stay of 1 to 3 days and a 4 to 6 weeks recovery time.

“I left the hospital the same day and with no pain,” says Paul. “Dr. Mynderse is my hero because he got rid of my catheter, and I enjoy life the way I use to.”


References

https://sharing.mayoclinic.org/2012/12/18/green-light-laser-surgery-treats-bph/

Hyperbaric Chambers - Oxygen Therapy

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy involves breathing pure oxygen in a pressurized environment. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is a well-established treatment for decompression sickness, potential risk of scuba diving. Other conditions treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy include serious infections, bubbles of air in your blood vessels, and wounds that may not heal due to diabetes or radiation injury.

In a hyperbaric oxygen therapy chamber, the air pressure is increased two to three times higher than normal air pressure. Under these conditions, your lungs can gather much more oxygen than would be possible breathing pure oxygen at normal air pressure.

When your blood carries this extra oxygen throughout your body, this helps fight bacteria and stimulate the release of substances called growth factors and stem cells, which promote healing.

Your body’s tissues need an adequate supply of oxygen to function. When tissue is injured, it requires even more oxygen to survive. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy increases the amount of oxygen your blood can carry. With repeated scheduled treatments, the temporary extra high oxygen levels encourage normal tissue oxygen levels, even after the therapy is completed.

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is used to treat several medical conditions. And medical institutions use it in different ways. Your doctor may suggest hyperbaric oxygen therapy if you have one of the following conditions:

  • Severe anemia
  • Brain abscess
  • Bubbles of air in your blood vessels (arterial gas embolism)
  • Burns
  • Carbon monoxide poisoning
  • Crushing injury
  • Deafness, sudden
  • Decompression sickness
  • Gangrene
  • Infection of skin or bone that causes tissue death
  • Non-healing wounds, such as a diabetic foot ulcer
  • Radiation injury
  • Skin graft or skin flap at risk of tissue death
  • Traumatic brain injury
  • Vision loss, sudden and painless
Risks

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is generally a safe procedure. Complications are rare. But this treatment does carry some risk.

Potential risks include:

  • Middle ear injuries, including leaking fluid and eardrum rupture, due to changes in air pressure
  • Temporary nearsightedness (myopia) caused by temporary eye lens changes
  • Lung collapse caused by air pressure changes (barotrauma)
  • Seizures as a result of too much oxygen (oxygen toxicity) in your central nervous system
  • Lowered blood sugar in people who have diabetes treated with insulin
  • In certain circumstances, fire — due to the oxygen-rich environment of the treatment chamber.
How to Prepare

You’ll be provided with a hospital-approved gown or scrubs to wear in place of regular clothing during the procedure.

For your safety, items such as lighters or battery-powered devices that generate heat are not allowed into the hyperbaric chamber. You may also need to remove hair and skin care products that are petroleum-based, as they are a potential fire hazard. Your health care team will provide instruction on preparing you to undergo hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

During Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is typically performed as an outpatient procedure but can also be provided while hospitalized.

In general, there are two types of hyperbaric oxygen chambers:

  • A unit designed for 1 person. In an individual (monoplace) unit, you lie down on a table that slides into a clear plastic chamber.
  • A room designed to accommodate several people. In a multi-person hyperbaric oxygen room — which usually looks like a large hospital room — you may sit or lie down. You may receive oxygen through a mask over your face or a lightweight, clear hood placed over your head.

Whether you’re in an individual or multi-person environment for hyperbaric oxygen therapy, the benefits are the same.

During therapy, the room's air pressure is about two to three times the normal air pressure. The increased air pressure will create a temporary feeling of fullness in your ears — similar to what you might feel in an airplane or at a high elevation. You can relieve that feeling by yawning or swallowing.

For most conditions, hyperbaric oxygen therapy lasts approximately two hours. Members of your health care team will monitor you and the therapy unit throughout your treatment.

After Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

Your therapy team assesses you, including looking in your ears and taking your blood pressure and pulse. If you have diabetes, your blood glucose is checked. Once the team decides you are ready, you can get dressed and leave.

You may feel somewhat tired or hungry following your treatment. This doesn’t limit normal activities.

Conclusions

To benefit from hyperbaric oxygen therapy, you’ll likely need more than one session. The number of sessions is dependent upon your medical condition. Some conditions, such as carbon monoxide poisoning, might be treated in three visits. Others, such as non-healing wounds, may require 40 treatments or more.

To effectively treat approved medical conditions, hyperbaric oxygen therapy is usually part of a comprehensive treatment plan provided with other therapies and drugs designed to fit your individual needs.

The Frozen Healer - Cryotherapy

Cryotherapy is a trend with a cult following in the recovery, wellness, and beauty industries. It can be used in combination with light therapy for better results. You may have heard people talking about it or seen celebrities or athletes posting themselves coming out of icy cold chambers on social media, but what is Cryotherapy? Why is everyone talking about it?

In its most basic form, Cryotherapy is simply the use of cold temperatures to heal the body. Using the cold to help our bodies recover from injury, inflammation, soreness, or relaxation has been used since the beginning. Putting ice on a wound or bruise, jumping in a cold lake, or taking an ice bath are basic cryotherapy forms. These methods cause stagnant blood to start moving again, promoting new blood flow, which brings healing. It is a fundamental, well-understood principle that has been widely accepted and used as a means of after the fact recovery but can be quite uncomfortable, inconvenient, and extremely inefficient compared to modern-day cryotherapy through the use of cryotherapy chambers.

Day by day

Modern-day cryotherapy lends from past cold modalities to provide a much more comfortable, convenient, and effective recovery through cryotherapy chambers. Cryotherapy chambers provide a quick, 2–3 minute private session of whole-body exposure to shallow temperatures in a dry, contained, breathable air environment. Add in some music, light therapy, and awesome fog from the cold, and it becomes a fun experience that completely distracts from how cold you just got!

The goal of true whole body cryotherapy is to expose as much skin as possible to temperatures of -166F or below for a short period of time (2–3 minutes) to create a drop in the external skin temperature of 30–40 degrees. The best way to measure this is to use an infrared temperature device before and after the session on the upper arm's back, measuring the two temperature readings' delta.

Effects of Cryotherapy

Blood rushing to the core is our body’s natural way of protecting our core organs from extreme cold. When exposed to freezing temperatures, blood rushes from our extremities to our core, creating a systemic response throughout the body that produces many benefits. Cold promotes increased blood flow, bringing fresh, oxygenated blood full of white blood cells to the body's areas that need it. Cryotherapy amplifies these positive effects and adds many more incredible benefits by activating the vagus nerve and causing vasoconstriction and vasodilation. The vagus nerve is responsible for the regulation of internal organ functions [NCBI]. The vagus nerve is activated by cold on the back of the neck and touches every major organ in the body.

Whole Body Cryotherapy is not just for extreme athletes or those with present injuries, either. The best practice is for healthy, normal adults (minors with doctors) to regularly practice whole body cryotherapy 3–5 times per week. It is important to maintain a constant cryotherapy regimen and not just use it when you feel you need it or are injured. It is a continual recovery modality that helps the body stay healthy and even resist injuries and illness.

Light to Manage Neuropathic Pain

Imagine that the movement of a single hair on your arm causes severe pain. For patients with neuropathic pain — a chronic illness affecting 7 to 8% of the European population, with no effective treatment — this can be a daily reality.

Scientists from EMBL Rome have now identified a special population of nerve cells in the skin that are responsible for sensitivity to gentle touch. These are also the cells that cause severe pain in patients with neuropathic pain. The research team, led by EMBL group leader Paul Heppenstall, developed a light-sensitive chemical that selectively binds to this nerve cell type. By first injecting the affected skin area with the chemical and then illuminating it with near-infrared light, the targeted nerve cells retract from the skin’s surface, leading to pain relief. Nature Communications publishes the results on 24 April 2018.

The Spicy Effect

By clipping off the nerve endings with light, the gentle touch that can cause severe pain in neuropathic patients is no longer felt. “It’s like eating a strong pepper, which burns the nerve endings in your mouth and desensitizes them for some time,” says Heppenstall. “The nice thing about our technique is that we can specifically target the small subgroup of neurons, causing neuropathic pain.”

There are many different nerve cells in your skin, which make you feel specific sensations like vibration, cold, heat, or normal pain. These cells are not affected by the light treatment at all. The skin is only desensitized to the gentlest touch, like a breeze, tickling, or an insect crawling across your skin.

Illumination vs. Drugs

Previous attempts to develop drugs to treat neuropathic pain have mostly focused on targeting single molecules. “We think, however, that there’s not one single molecule responsible. There are many,” Heppenstall explains. “You might be able to succeed in blocking one or a couple, but others would take over the same function eventually. With our new illumination method, we avoid this problem altogether.”

Touch and pain were assessed by measuring reflexes in mice affected by neuropathic pain in their limbs. Affected mice will normally quickly withdraw their paw when it is gently touched. After the light therapy, however, they exhibited normal reflexes upon gentle touch. The therapy's effect lasts for a few weeks, after which the nerve endings grow back, and gentle touch causes pain again.

The team also investigated human skin tissue. The tissue's overall makeup and the specifics of the neurons of interest appear to be similar, indicating that the method might be effective in managing neuropathic pain in humans. “In the end, we aim to solve the problem of pain in both humans and animals,” says Heppenstall. “Of course, a lot of work needs to be done before we can do a similar study in people with neuropathic pain. That’s why we’re now actively looking for partners and are open for new collaborations to develop this method further, with the hope of one day using it in the clinic.”

Fetuses May be Able to See More Light than you Think

By the second trimester, long before a baby's eyes can see images, they can detect light.

But the light-sensitive cells in the developing retina -- the thin sheet of brain-like tissue at the back of the eye -- were thought to be simple on-off switches, presumably there to set up the 24-hour, day-night rhythms parents hope their baby will follow. University of California, Berkeley, scientists have now found evidence that these simple cells actually talk to one another as part of an interconnected network that gives the retina more light sensitivity than once thought, and that may enhance the influence of light on behavior and brain development in unsuspected ways.

In the developing eye, perhaps 3% of ganglion cells -- the retina cells that send messages through the optic nerve into the brain -- are sensitive to light. To date, researchers have found about six different subtypes that communicate with various places in the brain. Some talk to the suprachiasmatic nucleus to tune our internal clock to the day-night cycle. Others send signals to the area that makes our pupils constrict in bright light.

But others connect to surprising areas: the perihabenula, which regulates mood, and the amygdala, which deals with emotions.

Recent evidence suggests that in mice and monkeys, these ganglion cells also talk with one another through electrical connections called gap junctions, implying much more complexity in immature rodent and primate eyes than imagined.

"Given the variety of these ganglion cells and that they project to many different parts of the brain, it makes me wonder whether they play a role in how the retina connects up to the brain," said Marla Feller, a UC Berkeley professor of molecular and cell biology and senior author of a paper that appeared this month in the journal Current Biology. "Maybe not for visual circuits, but non-vision behaviors. Not only the pupillary light reflex and circadian rhythms, but possibly explaining problems like light-induced migraines, or why light therapy works for depression."

Parallel systems in developing retina

The cells, called intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs), were discovered only 10 years ago, surprising those like Feller, who studied the developing retina for nearly 20 years. She played a major role, along with her mentor, Carla Shatz of Stanford University, in showing that spontaneous electrical activity in the eye during development -- so-called retinal waves -- is critical for setting up the correct brain networks to process images later on.

Hence her interest in the ipRGCs seemed to function in parallel with spontaneous retinal waves in the developing retina.

We thought they (mouse pups and the human fetus) were blind at this point in development. We thought that the ganglion cells were there in the developing eye, that they are connected to the brain, but that they were not really connected to much of the rest of the retina, at that point. Now, it turns out they are connected to each other, which was a surprising thing."

Marla Feller, the Paul Licht Distinguished Professor in Biological Sciences and a member of UC Berkeley's Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute.

UC Berkeley graduate student Franklin Caval-Holme combined two-photon calcium imaging, whole-cell electrical recording, pharmacology, and anatomical techniques to show that the six types of ipRGCs in the newborn mouse retina link up electrically, via gap junctions, to form a retinal network that the researchers found not only detect light but respond to the intensity of the light, which can vary nearly a billionfold.

Gap junction circuits were critical for light sensitivity in some ipRGC subtypes. Still, not others, providing a potential avenue to determine which ipRGC subtypes provide the signal for specific non-visual behaviors that light evokes.

"Aversion to light, which pups develop very early, is intensity-dependent," suggesting that these neural circuits could be involved in light-aversion behavior, Caval-Holme said. "We don't know which of these ipRGC subtypes in the neonatal retina actually contributes to the behavior, so it will be fascinating to see what role all these different subtypes have."

The researchers also found evidence that the circuit tunes itself in a way that could adapt to the intensity of light, which probably has an important role in development, Feller said.

"In the past, people demonstrated that these light-sensitive cells are important for things like the development of the blood vessels in the retina and light entrainment of circadian rhythms, but those were kind of a light on/light of the response, where you need some light or no light," she said. "This seems to argue that they are actually trying to code for many different intensities of light, encoding much more information than people had previously thought."
Source:

University of California, Berkeley

Journal reference:

Caval-Holme, F., et al. (2019) Gap Junction Coupling Shapes the Encoding of Light in the Developing Retina. Current Biology. doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2019.10.025.


Light Therapy can Benefit Patients with TBI (Traumatic Brain Injury)

According to a pioneering study by researchers from the Wellman Center for Photomedicine at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), light therapy is safe and has measurable effects on the brain.

Senior investigators Rajiv Gupta, MD, Ph.D., director of the Ultra-High Resolution Volume CT Lab at MGH and Benjamin Vakoc, Ph.D., at the Wellman Center led the study, which was supported by a grant from the Department of Defense (DOD) and published in JAMA Network Open September 14th.

This study is one of the first, if not the first, prospective, randomized, interventional clinical trials of near-infrared, low-level light therapy (LLLT) in patients who recently suffered a moderate brain injury. If further trials support these findings, light therapy could become the first widely-accepted treatment for this type of injury.

TBI is the leading cause of traumatic injury worldwide, and an estimated 69 million people experience such an injury every year. However, there are no treatments for this condition yet, largely because the underlying biological mechanisms are not well understood. It is so challenging to do studies with actual patients in the acute stage of trauma.

"The Gulf War put TBI in the headlines because body armor had been greatly improved by then. But there were still brain injuries caused by the shock waves from high powered explosives.”

Rajiv Gupta, MD, PhD, Director, Ultra-High Resolution Volume CT Lab

For various reasons, the number of TBIs has increased around the globe since then, but effective treatments are still sorely needed. For this study, a special helmet had to be designed specifically to deliver the therapy, an undertaking that required a mix of medical, engineering, and physics expertise.

This multidisciplinary team included Gupta, a neuroradiologist, Vakoc, an applied physicist, and others specializing in developing and translating optical instrumentation to the clinic and biologic laboratories. Both Gupta and Vakoc are also associate professors at Harvard Medical School.

“For this study, we designed a practical, near-infrared treatment based on Wellman Center research and working directly with DOD on the vexing problem of TBI, a condition faced by so many,” says Rox Anderson, MD, the center’s director.

Another challenge was optimizing the wavelength of the near-infrared LLLT.

“Nobody knows how much light you need to get the optimal effect,”

explains Lynn Drake, MD, one of the study co-authors and director of business development at the Wellman Center.

“We tried to optimize the wavelength, dosing, timing of delivery, and length of exposure.”

This was done through a series of pre-clinical experiments led by Anderson. These included multiple preclinical studies led by Michael Hamblin, Ph.D. Anderson and Hamblin are both co-authors of this paper.

Near-infrared LLLT has already been considered for multiple uses, but to date, few if any studies of this technology have been tested and none in patients with TBI.

It has been studied in stroke patients, and Wellman's basic laboratory research suggests it is neuroprotective through a mechanism mediated by specialized intracellular organs called mitochondria. It took several years of research at Wellman to understand the basic mechanism before the clinical trial.

The randomized clinical trial included 68 patients with moderate traumatic brain injury who were divided into two groups. One group received LLLT via the special helmet, which delivered the light. Patients in the control group wore the helmet for the same amount of time but did not receive the treatment.

Vakoc’s team at Wellman designed the helmet. During the study, the subjects’ brains were tested for neuron activity using quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) metrics, and the subjects also underwent neurocognitive function assessment.

MRI was performed in the acute (within 72 hours of the injury), early subacute (2–3 weeks), and late subacute (approximately three months) stages of recovery. During each visit and at six months, clinical assessments were performed using the Rivermead Post-Concussion Questionnaire, with each item assessed on a five-point scale.

Twenty-eight patients completed at least one LLLT session, and none reported any adverse reactions. Also, the researchers found that they could measure the effects of transcranial LLLT on the brain.

The MRI studies showed statistically significant differences in myelin's integrity surrounding the neurons of treated patients versus the control group. Both these findings support follow-up trials, especially since there are no other treatments for these patients.

The study also showed that light does impact the cells. While it is well established that cells have light receptors, “going into this trial, we had several unanswered questions such as whether the light would go through the scalp and skull, whether the dose was sufficient, and whether it would be enough to engage the neural substrates responsible for repair after TBI,” says Gupta.

It’s important to note, and he adds that for this initial study, the researchers focused on patients with moderate traumatic brain injury. That helped ensure their study could have statistically significant findings because patients in this category are more likely to demonstrate a measurable effect.

“It would be much more difficult to see such changes in patients with mild injuries, and it is quite likely that in patients with severe brain injuries, the effect of light therapy would be confounded by other comorbidities of severe trauma,”

says Gupta.

He adds that researchers are still very early in the development of this therapy. It is unknown if it could be applied to other types of brain injury, such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), which has received a lot of public attention over the last few years.

CTE is a progressive degenerative disease associated with a history of repetitive brain trauma such as that experienced by certain athletes, most notably football players.

This study opens up many possibilities for the broader use of photomedicine. “Transcranial LED therapy is a promising area of research, with potential to help various brain disorders where therapies are limited,” says Margaret Naeser, Ph.D., a prominent researcher in photomedicine and research professor of Neurology at Boston University School of Medicine. She was not affiliated with this particular study.

Source:

Massachusetts General Hospital

Journal reference:

Longo, M, G. F., et al. (2020) Effect of Transcranial Low-Level Light Therapy vs. Sham Therapy Among Patients With Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury. doi.org/10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2020.17337.

Half a Trillion-Dollar Market  —  Men.

There’s an emerging disruptor in the beauty industry as companies target a different consumer type to expand the half a trillion-dollar market — men.

Across the globe, men’s adoption of beauty use is already starting to take off. But the trend comes in many different shapes and forms. For beauty companies struggling to find new avenues of growth, it’s a huge opportunity to see whether men are looking for traditional grooming products, discreet moisturizers, beauty balms, or popular light therapy.

According to Allied Market Research, the men’s personal care industry is predicted to hit $166 billion by 2022. According to market researcher NPD Group, just last year, men’s skin-care products alone saw a more than 7% jump in sales and with the category currently valued at $122 million.

“In recent years, the notion that men can’t or shouldn’t be using skin-care products or caring more in general about all aspects of their appearance has been receding,”

Said Andrew Stablein, a research analyst at Euromonitor International, in a research note.

The success of digitally native brands catered directly to men such as Harry’s and popular subscription service Dollar Shave Club reveal

“the average men’s grooming routine isn’t about just shaving, but can be aided by using skin-care products,”

Stablein said.

Even high-end designers like Chanel have jumped on the trend, launching its first made-for-men skincare and cosmetics line known as “Boy De Chanel” last September.

“It seems that mass players are trying to expand their market and gain share in a slowing market by growing their user base,”

Said Alison Gaither, beauty and personal care analyst at Mintel.

This includes tutorials from U.K. makeup artist Charlotte Tilbury and Rihanna’s Fenty brand, which have both put out instructions for guys who want to use makeup subtly for a more groomed appearance.

According to Coresight Research, the Asia Pacific market is now one of the fastest-growing regions for men’s grooming and cosmetic product use. Jason Chen, general manager for Chinese online retail site Tmall, told Coresight that “supply cannot meet the demand for male make-up products across China.”

However, recent data suggests the new generation of beauty consumers prefer a non-binary approach altogether. According to NPD’s iGen Beauty Consumer report, nearly 40% of adults aged 18–22 have shown interest in gender-neutral beauty products and holistic products.

“There are so many … [people] growing up with the idea that you’re not tied to the gender you’re born with,”

Said Larissa Jensen, a beauty industry analyst at NPD.

“Beauty is no longer what you’re putting out as ‘ideal beauty.’ Beauty can be anything, anyone, and any gender.”

In 2016, shortly after Coty acquired CoverGirl, the brand made history with its first-ever “CoverBoy” featuring popular YouTube makeup artist James Charles.

Charles recently found himself in a very public spat with Tati Westbrook, another YouTube beauty vlogger. Coverage of the feud, which began after Charles backed a vitamin brand that was a rival to Westbrook’s own, has been widespread and shows the influence these internet personalities have and how the business has evolved over the past two years.

While Charles may be having his struggles now, as he has lost millions of subscribers, the attention he originally received from CoverGirl sparked similar collaborations by major brands including L’Oreal, who featured beauty blogger Manny Gutierrez, known under the moniker Manny MUA, as the face of its Maybelline Colossal mascara campaign in 2017.

“I think a lot of people misconstrue a man wearing makeup as someone that is transgender or someone that wants to be a drag queen, but it’s not that,”

Guitterez, founder and CEO of Lunar beauty told CNBC.

“I think right now people are still intimidated by the aspect of it.”

Gutierrez’s makeup tutorials and product reviews have attracted nearly 5 million subscribers to his YouTube page. According to a note by the NPD Group, one setting powder product saw a 40% surge in sales after Gutierrez promoted it on his YouTube channel.

“It’s all about inclusivity and encouraging people to be a little more inclusive with both men and women,”

Said Gutierrez.

“I think that as time progresses and you see more men in beauty, it’ll get a little bit better and better.”



How Effective is Blue Light Therapy for Spider Veins?

Medical spas often recommend Blue light therapy for spider veins because they don’t have to be administered by trained doctors. And, yes, after several expensive sessions, you might start seeing a difference. The most effective method to treat spider veins is Sclerotherapy. We’ll also discuss the benefits of using Sclerotherapy is an effective alternative.

What are Spider Veins?

Before discussing how to treat spider veins with blue light therapy or sclerotherapy, we need to discuss what causes spider veins.

Spider Veins, scientifically called Telangiectasias, are a small network of blood vessels visible just under the skin's surface. They are called “spider veins” because they look like red spider webs.

Spider veins generally occur on the legs, feet, thighs, and face. They can also cause slight pain and discomfort.

Causes and Dangers of Spider Veins

While spider veins aren’t dangerous in and of themselves, they can indicate underlying vein disease.

Vein Disease, also known as Chronic Venous Insufficiency, is a disease in which the valves in the veins malfunction. The valves are usually supposed to act as one-way doors and facilitate blood flow to the heart. However, when they malfunction, blood flows back down and pools around the legs. This can put pressure on the veins and lead to spider veins or varicose veins.

While spider veins themselves aren’t dangerous, vein disease is hazardous and needs to be treated immediately. If left untreated, venous insufficiency can result in bleeding, skin infections, and ulcers.

In the worst-case scenario, vein disease can also lead to Deep Vein Thrombosis, a medical condition in which blood clots in the veins. If the clotted blood breaks, it can get carried to the lungs, leading to a potentially fatal condition called Pulmonary Embolism.

What is Blue Light Therapy for Spider Veins?

Blue Light Therapy for spider veins is a method in which blue light or laser is used to treat spider veins. The laser is non-UV in nature and emits photons that generate heat. The heat can destroy the damaged blood vessel over time. As such, the damaged vein shrinks and eventually dissolves.

Advantages of Blue Light Therapy for Spider Veins

The only time that blue light therapy for spider veins has an advantage over sclerotherapy is when it comes to the foot or face.

Both the face and the foot are dense with venous-arterial connections. When using Sclerotherapy, the Sclero has to be injected into the veins. Injecting it into the arteries can be dangerous. Most conservative physicians prefer not to use Sclerotherapy for spider veins in the face or foot.

As such, it’s better to go for blue light therapy for spider veins in the face or foot.

Sclerotherapy: An Alternative to Blue Light Therapy for Spider Veins

Sclerotherapy is the most effective and permanent method to treat spider veins. It is a minimally-invasive procedure in which a medicine called Sclerosant is injected into the damaged vein.

The Sclerosant inflicts some chemical damage to the veins, which leads to the vein walls sticking together and eventually closing up. The blood is then routed to healthier veins, and the damaged vein eventually gets reabsorbed.

Advantages of Sclerotherapy for Spider Veins

There are multiple advantages of using Sclerotherapy to treat spider veins:

  • The process is minimally-invasive and non-surgical in nature.
  • Sclerotherapy doesn’t hurt or cause much discomfort.
  • It works immediately, and you don’t need to come back for multiple treatment sessions.
  • It can get rid of spider veins permanently.
  • The entire process takes just about 30 minutes.
  • You can resume your daily activities immediately after.
  • It is cheaper than Blue Light Therapy.


Red Light Therapy for Enhanced Cellular Function

The one thing we have in common with animals, plants, and other living organisms is that we are all made of tiny little cells. The intricate human body in itself houses trillions of cells. Without cells, there wouldn’t be any life on Earth at all.

In this article, we discuss cellular anatomy and cellular function. Here, we understand how light plays a role in the support and acceleration of cellular respiration.

What is a cell?

Think of cells as the basic building block of all living organisms. As the smallest unit of life, cells contain many parts, each with a different and specific function. The command center of the cell is called the nucleus that contains the human DNA.

As these cells combine to form into an organism, they become responsible for vital activities like nutrient intake, energy production, structure building, and hereditary material processing. They make sure that your body gets enough energy and nutrients to function 24/7.

What is ATP?

One essential activity that our cells do for us is by taking in oxygen and nutrients to fuel body energy. This energy unit that is converted by the cells is called Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) Energy.

The ATP itself is a molecule packed with high energy that empowers cellular function. ATP is required by the body to do every activity. Other cells that do more strenuous activities like muscle cells would need more ATP than others. The ideal optimal cellular function would allow cells to produce and use enough energy to achieve body balance or homeostasis.

How is ATP produced?

The mitochondria are the powerhouses of the cell. They are responsible for the production of ATP. Aside from cellular energy, this double-membrane powerhouse does protein synthesis, cell signaling, and cell apoptosis. ATP is produced with oxygen (aerobic) or without oxygen (anaerobic), the former being more beneficial because it converts more energy. Thus, 95% of cellular energy goes through an aerobic process.

Our cells go through a process called Aerobic cellular respiration to convert oxygen, food, and water into the body’s energy currency, which is ATP. This process is a well-organized metabolic pathway that consists of four stages. Our bodies take in nutrients from the food we eat for the first two stages to convert them into carbon compounds. Then for the next steps, these carbon compounds are transformed into the energy that our cells use.

How does light therapy support cellular function?

Light can sometimes be less attributed to improve our body’s physiology. However, light has benefits that go beyond aesthetic and technological purposes. Just like how light plays a role in plants' photosynthesis, it also benefits human cellular function.

Red light therapy from Kaiyan Medical composes of Red and Near-Infrared Wavelengths that aid in the Mitochondria's function to produce more ATP energy. It works by increasing the number of Mitochondria in our cells and by boosting their function.

The electron transport chain heavily governs the cellular respiration process. Red Light therapy has photons that can boost the mitochondria to function better through the Cytochrome C Oxidase. It plays an essential role in the cellular respiration process by improving the cell's electron transfer process. In this way, more ATP can be produced by the body for an enhanced cellular function.

As mentioned earlier, oxygen plays an essential role in the cellular respiration process. The infamous Nitric Oxide can take the rightful place of oxygen to limit ATP production that causes stress and cellular death. Red light therapy also gets rid of a harmful roadblock to ATP in the dissociation of Nitric Oxide and the Cox. The photons from Red light therapy prohibits the production of nitric oxide.

The effect that Red Light therapy does on our body is that by improving cellular function, our body can achieve these benefits:

  • Improved blood Flow
  • Increased Energy Build up
  • Enhanced Healing Response
  • Reduced Inflammation
  • Reduced Stress
  • Balanced Cellular Function

As you do daily activities such as eating, drinking, walking, or working out, think of the massive role that your cellular system plays to make these activities possible. In this way, you can put conscious efforts into improving your cellular system through a healthy diet and lifestyle and by integrating Red Light Therapy.

References:

https://www.healthline.com/health/red-light-therapy#how-does-it-work?

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5215870/

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/325884

https://www.britannica.com/science/cell-biology

https://www.britannica.com/science/mitochondrion

https://www.nationalgeographic.org/media/cellular-respiration-infographic/

Animal Wellness: Red Light Therapy for Dogs

Certified pup parents know pets could easily sense when we’re feeling sad, happy, scared, or sick. Our furry friends could probably read us better than we could read them. However, active pets are also prone to injuries, cuts, wounds, inflammation, and infections like human beings.

If you’re a pet owner, you’d always want to give your pets the best care possible to make sure they are healthy and happy at all times. Thankfully, medicine has innovated well enough to find more advanced treatments and maintenance tools for our canine friends. In recent years, pet owners and some veterinarians have been using safe, non-invasive, and high-tech treatments for pets and domestic animals such as Red-Light therapy.

What is Red Light Therapy?

Red light therapy has been utilized by the veterinary world to deliver similar benefits to pets, just like humans. Red light therapy is a non-invasive treatment and a form of photobiomodulation that alters animal cells' physiology.

Light therapy produces wavelengths of photons that the photoreceptors in the animal’s bodies can absorb. The light provides alteration to the animal cells that result in numerous benefits such as better blood circulation and natural cellular regeneration.

Multiple studies support the efficacy of red-light therapy to animals. A 2017 study shows how Red Light therapy promoted faster healing for dogs that underwent bone surgery. The findings were also complemented by another study that suggests near-infrared wavelengths promoted bone cell reproduction for dogs.

Red Light Treatment for Dogs?

When our pets sprain their ankles or cut their pads, their cells become damaged. As a result, their bodies need cell energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to repair damaged cells and tissues.

The photoreceptors in their body absorb red light. The light stimulates ATP production in the animal’s body that results in faster delivery of nutrients and better excretion of toxins. All of these processes are essential for the body’s healing.

Red Light also promotes better circulation as it stimulates Nitric Oxide production to help blood vessels remain flexible. Injured or damaged cells need proper blood flow for healing. Light therapy helps in the healing process by increasing blood flow to ensure enough nutrients and oxygen in the affected area.

Red light is beneficial for surface healing by helping tissues that are potent in hemoglobin. On the other hand, near-infrared light can work better on deeper wounds as it can pass through the animal’s body's deeper tissues.

Innovators like Kaiyan Medical uses the FDA-cleared Red Light Therapy pad that utilizes the combined technology of Red Light-emitting diodes that can penetrate the skin and infrared wavelengths that can heal muscles, ligaments, and tendons. Red light and near-infrared wavelengths are the ideal combination of surface and inner healing.

Aside from providing the cells with energy, the light also stimulates collagen production, which aids in repairing damaged tissues. Collagen is an essential protein that can help get rid of scars and wounds.

What are the conditions that can be addressed by Red Light Therapy?

Skin and Surface issues

  • Surface wounds
  • Hair loss
  • Eczema
  • Other Skin Conditions
  • Wounds and Cuts

Deeper surface issues

  • Arthritis
  • Soft tissue injuries
  • Ligament injuries
  • Post-surgery Inflammation
  • Pain, Inflammation, and Swelling
  • hip dysplasia
  • Tendon problems
  • Strains and sprains
  • Salivary gland problems

General Maintenance

  • Maintenance of healthy joints and Bones
  • Maintenance of healthy Cardiovascular system
  • Maintenance of healthy Digestive system
  • Healthy Vision
  • Prevention of anxiety

Light therapy can be your best therapeutic tool in boosting your pet’s overall wellbeing. As a general rule, light therapy is a safe and non-invasive option for treating minor issues and maintaining their overall health. However, if your pet is undergoing more severe health problems, it’s best to consult your veterinarian for a more conducive treatment plan. While red light therapy is not a panacea for all your dog’s health issues, it’s a low-risk and pain-free option to complement treatments and to promote overall wellness for your beloved pet.

References:

https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/islsm/13/1/13_1_73/_article/-char/ja/

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/vde.12170?deniedAccessCustomisedMessage=&userIsAuthenticated=false

https://www.thieme-connect.com/products/ejournals/abstract/10.3415/VCOT-15-12-0198

https://www.degruyter.com/view/journals/plm/1/2/article-p117.xml

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1053/jvet.1999.0292?deniedAccessCustomisedMessage=&userIsAuthenticated=false

How Does Red Light Therapy Relate with Ketogenic Diet?

Red light therapy is an easily accessible and affordable clinical device that boosts metabolism and increases ATP energy production. It is a non-invasive modulator of metabolism that delivers proper frequency, power, and luminance by shifting the mitochondria's function organically.

Ketogenic Diet and Red Light Therapy

A ketogenic diet involves the consumption of low-carb, high-fat meals. When practiced together with red light therapy, it can amplify your metabolic flexibility. It also helps cells burn more sugar and fat efficiently. Good levels of ATP energy production (empowered by mitochondria by converting oxygen and nutrients to ATP) can help prevent high-blood or low-blood pressure conditions. The process of creating ATP energy works best when our body and cells are well-balanced, reaching a state called homeostasis.

One thing to consider in following a diet plan is over-nutrition, which may lead to metabolic inflexibility. When over-feeding happens, the production of ATP energy may result in metabolic congestion. Red light therapy can help alleviate this metabolic congestion by focusing amplification of ATP energy levels. Insulin can mediate metabolic congestion by the fluidity between glucose, fatty acids, and amino acids. An important step for ATP energy production is forming the COX enzyme, which can aid metabolism by pairing oxygen neutralized into the water with high-energy electrons.

If the COX enzyme goes out of sync with electrons' flow, the high-energy electrons won’t effectively be neutralized into water. Red light can help regulate the healthy formation of the COX enzyme, efficiently oxidizing fat. The ketogenic diet triggers cells to insulin by stimulating ATP energy production by increasing metabolic flexibility, reducing carbon combustion, and helping clear metabolic congestion.

Significance to Healing

The chemical DHEA (dehydroepiandrosterone) plays numerous vital roles in health. It helps with the metabolism of cholesterol that produces hormones such as progesterone, estrogen, and testosterone. As we age, our levels of DHEA decreases, as well as the synthesis of such hormones. Low levels of progesterone can affect women in their peri-menopausal and post-menopausal stages. This is a function of the decline in mitochondria, which then affects ATP energy levels.

Low levels of DHEA may contribute to the insufficiency of adrenaline and estrogen dominance, which is common to middle-aged women at the peri-menopausal or post-menopausal stage. Women rely on the production of adrenaline and DHEA to keep their progesterone levels and prevent estrogen dominance.

Lower production of DHEA and progesterone can be an effect of elevated secretion of cortisol that is caused by acute/chronic stress. When high levels of stress reduce the adrenal glands' proper functions due to the decrease of synthesis of the adrenal cortex steroid hormones in the mitochondria, it results in adrenal insufficiency.

Based on health professionals' studies, when cortisol levels drop, it inhibits the synthesis and secretion of DHEA/progesterone, resulting in pathophysiological changes caused by stress. Enzyme activation and regulatory signaling can affect the fluidity dynamics between cortisol, DHEA, and other hormones such as progesterone, estrogen, and testosterone.

Red light therapy and ketogenic diet can mediate inflammatory stress and regulate the healthy production of DHEA.

Estrogen Levels

Estrogen is a master regulator of female metabolism. A youthful and regulatory expression of estrogen is the production of 17B-estradiol (E2). It modulates the menstrual cycle to ensure the healthy release of the corpus luteum, which secretes progesterone.

On the other hand, progesterone helps maintain a healthy uterus lining. When the expression of E2 is sufficient, progesterone secretion also increases. Having high progesterone levels means having lower estrogen and a lesser risk of getting diseases like breast, ovary, and colon cancer. E2 also contributes to potential partition fuel, orchestrating metabolic flexibility, and increasing energy levels that lead to optimal cerebral glucose metabolism.

The decline in the peripheral steroidogenesis of E2, progesterone, and testosterone is common as time goes by.

Testosterone Levels

A 12-week ketogenic diet may increase testosterone levels in men due to an increase in cholesterol and DHEA. Red light therapy also improves the mitochondrial synthesis of testosterone from DHEA.

For males, testosterone naturally converts to E2, but healthy testosterone levels stipulate a hormonal challenge to the synthesis of E2. An enlarged prostate can be caused by estrogen dominance when there is no testosterone/estrogen ratio balance. Having healthy testosterone levels may lead to a decline of estrogen dominance, as it is for progesterone in women.

Other Healing Benefits

Healthcare professionals strongly believe that red light therapy can be a powerful healing agent that may help prevent diabetic ulcers and lower chances of extremity amputations when practiced together with a ketogenic diet.

Diabetic ulcers usually result to lower limb amputations in the long-run. Studies show that diabetic foot ulcers and lower extremity amputations are increasing in number. In fact, having unhealed wounds can be alarming as the post-amputation survival rate for people with diabetes averages to only five years. Statistics show the urgent need to prevent, detect, and prove that treatments for lower limb ulcers should be highly considered. Red light therapy has been proven to increase the circulation of blood flow and healthier skin.

Innovation

Red light therapy and ketogenic diets are considered to be disruptive innovators in the healthcare system. Apart from the fact that red light therapy is non-invasive, such treatment shows great potential in helping lengthen the lifespan and improve people's overall health. Red light therapy also promotes a more affordable and accessible treatment that can be done in the comfort of your home.

Here at Kaiyan Medical, we offer red light therapy devices to help you achieve your health and aesthetic goals. To learn more about the brands and products we offer, please click here.

More References

https://perfectketo.com/red-light-therapy/

https://perfectketo.com/keto-diet-plan-for-beginners/

https://www.rejuvcryo.com/the-science/2019/8/14/article-the-surprising-synergy-between-keto-and-red-light-therapy-rejuvcryo-north-county-san-diego

The Benefits of Red Light Therapy in Treating Hypothyroidism

Thyroid issues are a commonplace problem that affects all ages and genders. It significantly contributes to changes in mental outlook, energy levels, skin, and weight. Hypothyroidism has drawn much attention due to many cases that are left undiagnosed, untreated, or inadequately treated. As a result, it led to more serious problems such as infertility, heart disease, neurological problems, and high cholesterol and blood pressure levels. Not to mention, treatment studies for hypothyroidism have experienced a significant backlog throughout the years.

In this article, we take a look at the basic precepts of hypothyroidism and how Red light therapy plays a role in treating the thyroid problem.

What is Hypothyroidism?

Hypothyroidism is a chronic abnormality of the thyroid gland, demonstrating an inadequacy of thyroid hormones such as triiodothyronine and thyroxine (T4). Normal levels of thyroid hormones stimulate a healthy amount of mitochondrial energy production. This means that in hypothyroid cases, the thyroid inhibits a state of low cellular energy.

As a result, people who suffer from this chronic problem often feel unusual fatigue, tiredness, weight changes, and skin problems. However, symptoms can vary from person to person and may even be subtle enough to be left undiagnosed and untreated. When left untreated, the disease causes more irreversible neurological, reproductive, and cardiovascular problems. It’s also found that Hypothyroidism is found to be five to eight times more prevalent in women than in men.

What Causes Hypothyroidism?

Hypothyroidism can be caused by a wide range of diet and lifestyle issues. Some cases can be caused by a lack of iodine intake, especially in more underdeveloped parts of the world. It can also be caused by other dietary issues such as low carb intake, excess polyunsaturated fat intake, and alcoholism. Other typical causes include stress, aging, sleep deprivation, and heredity.

What is Light Therapy?

When talking about light, we often think of it as the first thing we switch on in a dark room or the bright rays that set up the mood. We don’t usually think of it as having bioactive properties, penetrating beneath our skin, affecting the way our hormones, tissues, and cells function.

In reality, our cells actually capture photons of light, just like how plants do. Light therapy, also called photobiomodulation, essentially means light (photo) changing (modulation) your biology (bio).

How Can Red Light Therapy Help Treat Hypothyroidism?

Red and near-infrared light therapy, backed by over 5,000 studies, has grown its significance in medicinal treatments throughout the years.

Red light therapy is significantly targeted for hypothyroidism because unlike other kinds of light; they have a greater penetrability beneath our skin.

In fact, a 2010 study found that 38% of patients with Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism who were given red light therapy treatments have reduced their medication dose, while 17% have been able to stop the medication completely.

Here’s how it works:

  1. It Supplies energy

Because hypothyroidism is reflective of low cellular energy in the thyroid, red and near-infrared light helps the cells work better by supplying more energy to your body.

They have a photoreceptor called cytochrome c oxidase that works by catching photos of light. Like how our food is being processed by our body for the mitochondria to stimulate energy, the photos of light also stimulate energy production in the mitochondria. The mitochondria are responsible for the energy production of our body’s cells.

  1. It Prevents Stress

Red light is also shown to prevent stress by averting nitrous oxide poisoning. This means that aside from helping the mitochondria supply more energy, red light helps the thyroid hormone by alleviating stress-related molecules' effects.

  1. It Breaks the Cycle

Hypothyroidism is a vicious cycle of having low energy availability and decreased thyroid hormone production. By stimulating energy production in the mitochondria and preventing nitrous oxide poisoning prevention, red light can potentially break the cycle responsible for hypothyroidism.

In Kaiyan Medical, we produce a medical-grade red light therapy device that is effective and non-invasive, ideal for supplementing hypothyroidism treatments. Our device has a dual optical energy technology that combines red light and infrared light therapy as an excellent spectrum for deeper penetration and absorption. You can now rise above hypothyroidism and maximize your body’s healing properties with our Red Light therapy device.

More References

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6247385/

https://drruscio.com/red-light-therapy-part-ii/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6822815/

https://www.health.harvard.edu/newsletter_article/treating-hypothyroidism


Speeding up Recovery for Athletes: Red Light Therapy Treatment

Athletes take exercise and training very seriously to maximize and improve performance. Whether you’re a competitive elite athlete or someone who’s just born to win every day, recovery can be one of the most neglected aspects of our daily lives.

Recovery: We hear it all the time from coaches and instructors, but it’s also one of the hardest things to do. The saying “Push yourself to your limits” happens also to have its own limits. Neglecting your training recovery aspect for optimal performance can take a toll on our body in the long run.

In this article, we show the importance of rest and recovery and some of the ways to speed up our body’s healing process, such as integrating red light therapy treatment.

What is Recovery?

After training or a strenuous workout, our body responds to strain, injury, or stress as a defense mechanism in inflammation. While it may sound damaging, inflammation is a natural response when our muscle tissue regenerates and grows from microtears. Going through the process is important to allow muscle growth and performance improvement. However, the inflammation needs recovery for your muscles to heal from too much strain or injury for it to maximize its healing effects.

Recovery is the process that your body undergoes to recuperate between training sessions or from the time of danger to its healing progression. Recovery works by giving your body time to regenerate muscle tissues.

Whether it’s a strain, acute soreness, or severe damage, your body needs time to heal. The time needed for the recovery process is also dependent on the severity of the damage/strain/injury. This means that the greater the stressor's intensity to your body, the longer the time you need to spend to allow your body to recover.

What are the Examples of Recovery?
  • Getting enough sleep
  • Resting
  • Cooling down
Why is Recovery Time Important?

Many athletes have made recovery time a priority as it assists in the healing process of muscles post-inflammation. Giving your body time to recover can result in an improved performance.

During the recovery time, the muscle repairs regenerate and strengthens to tolerate a higher level of strain the next time. In other words, taking time to heal makes you stronger and less susceptible to future injuries. Having enough recovery time helps in optimal performance and longevity by helping the athletes convalesce both psychologically and physically to train and perform better.

By doing this, you can prevent future chronic problems, decreased sports performance, increased risk of injuries, or fatigue caused by inadequate healing.

What are the Ways to Speed Recovery?

1. Plan Your Rest Time

Planning your rest schedule and duration involves many factors such as the intensity of your activity, your age, and your skill level in sports/pieces of training. You may need less time to recover or more, depending on your personal needs. As a general rule, for medium to intense workouts/training, it is prescribed to maintain a healthy duration of 45 hours in between training.

Pro tip: Engage in Active Recovery

If you’re not suffering from an injury or severe damage, it’s important to incorporate active recovery periods during your recovery time so your body can maintain its active state.

Proper blood circulation is important in the recovery process. When the body gets injured, the body responds by dilating blood cells to speed up blood flow. Active recovery helps maintain good blood circulation and removes lactic acid out of inflamed muscles. Active recovery activities involve light physical movements such as stretching or yoga to allow proper blood flow and help your muscles recover and adapt better.

2. Get Enough Sleep

The Human Growth Hormone (HGH) is at its peak at night as we sleep. This hormone is responsible for tissue repair and recovery. This is why the key to a speedy recovery is to make you get a good REM sleep at the right time during your recovery period. Make sure to get a minimum of 7 hours of sleep at night to ensure that your body gets enough rest that it needs and to avoid any future complications. Lack of sleep can deter the process of muscle recovery.

Pro tip: Don’t be scared of having a few extra hours

Especially when you are suffering from intense strain/injury, it’s important to sneak in a few extra hours of sleep within your recovery period. In fact, a 2018 study suggests that sleep extension, a form of sleep intervention, can significantly contribute to the success of an athlete’s recovery. One way to ensure you get a significant amount of rest is to make sure your body has a healthy circadian rhythm. If you’re worried that you’re having trouble sleeping at night, there are many ways to improve your circadian clock- including red light therapy.

3. Refuel your Body

A healthy diet is also one of the great pillars of health. The nutrients you take in play a great role in your body’s function to cooperate with the recovery process. Minimize processed foods that may contain too much salt, sweets, and alcohol. These types of food may promote inflammation and dehydration, which can hinder the recovery process. Make sure to eat a balance recommended diet of whole foods.

Have an evaluation with a licensed dietitian or nutritionist to assess your nutritional needs. Assessment may vary depending on different factors such as weight, BMI, and activity level.

Pro tip: Focus on your Protein Intake

Protein is the key macronutrient that is responsible for muscle building and repair. It has amino acids that are metabolized by your body to ease muscle inflammation and build stronger muscles. Skip gulping on those protein supplements and focus instead on taking protein from whole foods such as lean meat, eggs, and cheese.

4. Listen to your Body

There can be all kinds of rules in recovery to maximize healing, but you can’t go wrong with paying attention to your body’s signals. Often, your body’s responses can be neglected. However, overlooking these signals can result in overtraining, which puts your body at risk of having more problems in the long run.

Despite your recovery time or period, if your body signals indicate pain and soreness, it’s important to give it time to recover better to address the issue. Aside from obvious physiological signs, pay attention to your heart rate variability, indicating your body’s adaptability to stress and your overall cardiovascular fitness.

5. Incorporate Red Light Therapy

Thanks to innovative medical devices, athletes and trainers have utilized more advanced healing modalities like red light therapy. Red Light Therapy is a popular, non-invasive, and effective light therapy treatment that can improve blood circulation essential for tissue and muscle recovery. It works by using LED to deliver wavelengths that deeply penetrates the skin and cells.

Integrating red light therapy in your recovery process can speed up muscle repair and minimize pain and swelling. The therapy accelerates the healing process by enhancing macrophage activity responsible for the white blood cell’s healing and anti-inflammatory response.

Pro tip: Try using Light Therapy Body Pad

Kaiyan Medical’s Light Therapy Body pad utilizes a high-end, medical-grade dual optical energy pad that uses 30 pieces of red light and 30 pieces of infrared light. The therapy's duality promotes deep treatment by treating injured skin surface while repairing deeper muscle, bones, tissue, and joint damage. The therapy pad is specially made with a broader light spectrum to increase absorption and penetration so you can maximize the treatment’s benefits. It’s a safe, non-invasive treatment that you can add to your recovery process so you can get back in the game stronger than ever.

Recovery and Rest are just as important as optimizing and improving performance. Allowing your body to maximize its natural healing processes can improve performance and overall better physical and mental health.

More References

Ratamess NA, Alvar BA, Kibler WB, Kraemer WJ, Triplett NT. American College of Sports Medicine position stand. Progression models in resistance training for healthy adults. Med Sci Sports Exerc 2009.

Garber CE, Blissmer B, Deschenes MR et al. American College of Sports Medicine position stand. Quantity and quality of exercise for developing and maintaining cardiorespiratory, musculoskeletal, and neuromotor fitness in apparently healthy adults: guidance for prescribing exercise. Med Sci Sports Exerc 2011.

Michael Kellmann, Maurizio Bertollo, et al. Recovery and Performance in Sport: Consensus Statement. Int J Sports Physiol Perform. 2018 Feb 1.

So-Ichiro Fukada, Takayuki Akimoto, Athanasia Sotiropoulos. Role of damage and management in muscle hypertrophy: Different muscle stem cells' behaviors in regeneration and hypertrophy. Biochim Biophys Acta Mol Cell Res. 2020 Sep.

Daniel J Plews, Paul B Laursen, et al. Training adaptation and heart rate variability in elite endurance athletes: opening the door to effective monitoring. Sports Med. 2013 Sep.

Michael R. Irwin, Richard Olmstead, Judith E. Carroll. Sleep Disturbance, Sleep Duration, and Inflammation: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies and Experimental Sleep Deprivation. Biol Psychiatry. 2016 Jul 1; 80(1): 40–52.

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/247927

https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/heart-rate-variability-new-way-track-well-2017112212789

https://www.webmd.com/men/features/benefits-protein#1

How Saunas and Red Light Therapy are Distinct but Complementing

Saunas and red light therapy devices are clinically-proven treatments that complement each other wonderfully, even if they depend on distinct biological mechanisms to yield various natural health and aesthetic benefits.

In this article, we’ll focus on how things work for red light therapy and the distinctions of traditional saunas, and what you can actually gain by availing of either of them.

What You Need to Know About Saunas

Saunas can make your body’s core temperature hotter by supplying sufficient heat throughout your body. It has been a part of traditional medicine for various centuries, as the old century folks realized the health benefits of sweating. Although there are multiple types of saunas, two of them are the most popular:

  1. Traditional Convection Saunas

When you think of saunas, this is the first scenario that comes to mind: hot and steamy. This type of sauna requires more energy as it delivers heat to the atmosphere, warming the air inside the sauna, and distributes heat in the body. Traditional convection saunas can maintain air temperatures between 170–200°F and are an ideal type of sauna for general use. It is important to comprehend the different temperatures required for specific health concerns since being exposed to heat more than what has required triggers a warning for unsubstantiated claims.

  1. Infrared Saunas

The latest trend in saunas is the infrared saunas. Inside, instead of warming the air, this kind of sauna heats actual objects. Such objects include those with emitting surfaces, charcoal, and carbon fiber. Infrared saunas' effectivity is directly attributed to the temperature, humidity, and length of time your body is exposed to heat, even though many saunas claim to provide “full-spectrum” infrared wavelengths.

The farther the wavelengths are in the infrared spectrum, the more they are considered efficient and effective in heat production. This will be thoroughly discussed later, but the general gist is that heat supplementation is the primary purpose of saunas, convection, and infrared.

On the other hand, near-infrared wavelengths in near-infrared saunas generate very little heat. Most of the high-quality standard saunas use more effective heats from the far-infrared spectrum or IR-C wavelengths.

What are the Health Benefits of Saunas?

Inducing thermal stress on the body is the primary function of every sauna, but what does it really mean?

One of many biological responses from sauna usage is increased heart rate as well as perspiration. The essential body processes protein metabolism and is also affected by enough heat. Heat shock proteins are a special kind of protein that responds specifically to cellular stress from heat. Heat stress induction leads to natural health benefits like those we gain doing physical activities.

One experiment had participants sat in a sauna treatment for 30 minutes at 194°F for 3 weeks, totaling 13 work sessions. The results showed that the participants improved 32% in performance tests versus those who underwent sauna treatments.

Besides improving your cardiovascular functions, using saunas can help reap benefits such as detoxication, decreased depression, and lesser chronic fatigue.

Red Light Therapy vs. Saunas

What differentiates saunas from red light therapy devices is their mechanism of action. While saunas utilize heat for biological effects, red light therapy devices supply healthy light wavelengths directly to the skin and cells. Even when producing almost no heat, red light therapy devices help with cellular function improvement and support bodily balance. Simply put, red light therapy helps energize the body with light, while saunas heat your body.

How does red light therapy work?

Mitochondria, the powerhouse of our cells, is wonderfully affected by certain wavelengths of natural light. This helps in producing energy within the cells of our body, feeding photons to our cells from natural light via red light therapy.

What about clinically-proven wavelengths?

We feel warm when exposed to sunlight and other heat sources such as fire and hot coals because most of the wavelengths, including ultraviolet (UV), are rapidly absorbed by the outer layers of the skin tissue as heat.

However, unknown to many, some wavelengths have the unique capability of boosting your cellular functions and energy. These are those few wavelengths that can penetrate human tissues more effectively, having photons power-up your “cellular batteries.”

What to Look for When Buying Red Light Therapy Devices and Saunas?

One of the first few things you need to look for in saunas is the temperature it produces. You need to consider some other factors, including the type of wood, the heating unit (Is it conventional or infrared? Is it near far or full-spectrum?), finishes and stains, price, and more.

On the other hand, some of the factors you need to consider when choosing a red light therapy device are the device’s light energy output, light color or frequency range in terms of nanometers, warranty, body or treatment coverage area, the price, and the credibility of the company provider.

Light Therapy and Saunas: Friends with Benefits

Saunas and red light therapy devices offer a wide range of natural health benefits, which surprisingly go well with each other. They both support balance and health to improve your fitness and function but do not overlap with each other’s effects because of energy supplementation in distinct forms and wavelengths. What a great combination of complementary natural therapies!

Here at Kaiyan Medical, we provide different types of red light therapy devices for various medical, wellness, and aesthetic uses. To see our list of products, click here.

References:

https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/saunas-and-your-health

https://www.healthline.com/health/fitness-exercise/are-saunas-good-for-you

Scoon GS, Hopkins WG, Mayhew S, Cotter JD. Effect of post-exercise sauna bathing on the endurance performance of competitive male runners. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport. 2007 Aug.

Crinnion WJ. Sauna as a valuable clinical tool for cardiovascular, autoimmune, toxicant- induced and other chronic health problems. Altern Med Rev. 2011 Sep.



Let’s Talk About Optimal Performance Recovery and Red Light Therapy

Performance and recovery go hand in hand when training or doing physical activities, regardless if you’re an athlete or not. In fact, athletes and their trainers utilize light therapy to improve their performance and muscle health and optimize recovery. To expound further, this article will tackle optimizing performance in fitness, improving the recovery process, and breaking down the significance of light therapy.

Optimizing Performance and Improving Recovery

Optimizing performance means paying attention to the body and how it functions, to live and train the body, and to find the best way to support its functions. Performance is not based on how hard or heavy are the weights you lift or the number of kilometers you’ve run; it is how effective your performance is and how you match it with your lifestyle (with the way you eat, drink and sleep).

On the other hand, recovery is about the effectiveness of the body’s healing process and the conscious effort of being in your best shape by enhancing your workout. It is also about utilizing the body’s tools and functions to effectively finish the jobs required daily.

Physical Performance and Recovery

Performance and recovery are correlated to one another. In exercising or training, if you want to improve fitness, workouts should be consistent. To get stronger, faster, and bigger, certain efforts must be made to increase performance levels. The recovery process is essential in health. It contributes to the workout; it is the downtime between training sessions or a break due to an injury or a period of healing from any exhaustion experienced.

Breaks like cool-downs, rest, and ample time of sleep give your body time to recuperate. They also allow healing for the muscles and tissues affected, strained, or damaged from workouts or training.

Performance is better when recovery time from soreness or inflammation is maximized. It also helps prevent burnout, fatigue, and possible injuries. If recovery is not made right, your physical performance may not reach its optimal state. Some athletes and trainers even make a recovery a priority over training itself. They believe that when an athlete recovers better than their competition, they will train harder in the long run.

Recovery is for Everyone

Even if you are not an athlete, you should know how to let your body rest, heal, and recover properly from any form of injury or physical activity. Everyone has their own activity levels to maintain. It may not be sports-related, but everyone demands effort from their bodies on a day-to-day basis.

When Recovery is Not Prioritized…

Regardless if you are an athlete, your body has limits. And if you push too hard, the body can break down and perform worse, especially if you didn’t observe any recovery time. Overtraining and pushing the body beyond its limits can affect performance in the short term or long term. Chances of injury are higher when you don’t allow yourself to recover, and it may also affect hormonal levels and the function of the immune system. The body needs time to process inflammation or any injury.

Inflammation and the Importance of Recovery

Inflammation happens when the body responses to danger or strain. It often takes place during a strenuous workout. When exercising, inflammation may indicate muscular damage. And when a muscle is “damaged,” it means that the tissue is growing and undergoes repair to get stronger.

Experiencing inflammation is a normal part of the growth and repair of muscle tissues. However, if you won’t set aside time for recovery, your inflammation may worsen over time and lead to greater health consequences.

4 Easy Ways to Improve the Recovery Process

Here are some ways that can help you improve your body’s recovery process:

  1. Body awareness

The body speaks when it sends signals to the brain. Sometimes, we dismiss these signals because of training goals. This may eventually lead to fatigue and injury. When you experience pain or when your muscles are sore, it is important to give your body time to recuperate. You must also be aware of your heart rate, especially at rest, as it may be saying something about the state of your health.

  1. Getting enough sleep

Besides giving your body time to recuperate, deep sleep also allows the body to digest and process fat and recover from inflammation or damaged muscle tissues. It is harder for the body to recover from pain, strain, fatigue, and injury when you’re sleeping less than 7–8 hours per night. If you’re struggling with getting enough sleep, try doing meditation or speak with a doctor so he/she can advise you about developing a sleeping routine.

  1. Eating a balanced diet.

Getting the right amount of whole foods, good carbohydrates, protein, and good fat can also boost your performance and recovery. Lowering your intake of processed foods, alcohol, and sugary drinks can also help decrease inflammation.

  1. Aiming for balanced and healthy cells

The performance and recovery of our bodies depend entirely on our cells. When our cells are creating and using energy efficiently, our bodies recover faster. ATP (adenosine triphosphate) energy is released to give us power in what we do. The process of creating ATP energy works best when our body and cells are well-balanced, reaching a state called homeostasis.

Light Therapy, Performance, Healing, and Recovery

High-quality devices are now available in the market to help athletes and trainers enhance the body’s natural healing and recovery process through light therapy.

Light therapy is a non-invasive treatment that uses LED lights to deliver red and near-infrared light to the skin and cells. It promotes efficient cellular ATP energy production and helps restore the balance of cells and tissues. Light therapy can be done before or after a workout. Some even do it both times — before and after a workout, depending on their goals.

Pre-conditioning with light therapy before working out can also help strengthen muscle performance. It can limit muscle damage and strain, lessening the chances of inflammation or soreness. When used after a workout, it promotes the speedy recovery of muscles and accelerates its adaptability to exercise. It also helps the body process acute inflammation after physical activity.

The Relationship Between Light Therapy and Muscle Cells

Muscles are composed of millions of cells that need to release ATP energy to fulfill the body's jobs, balancing exercise and stress. Light therapy helps improve cellular ATP energy, glycogen synthesis, oxidative stress reduction, and protection against muscle damage from exercising. Light therapy also helps improve blood circulation and oxygen availability, which allows better healing and recovery. It helps with the overall improvement of physical performance and faster recovery times. It also helps limit fatigue from exercising and strength training.

Recover and Improve Your Performance with Light Therapy

As discussed, light therapy promotes faster healing and recovery and soothes cells under stress when doing strenuous workouts, incurring injuries, and experiencing inflammation. When you set aside time for recovery, you give your body and cells what they need to function, thus improving your overall performance.

At Kaiyan Medical, we offer high-quality light therapy devices to help you achieve and maintain your fitness and performance goals. If you have questions about our products and the brands we offer, please don’t hesitate to contact us. We will respond to you as soon as possible.

The Effect of Green & Red Light Therapy on Hearing

Low-level laser therapy

Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been practiced for over 20 years in Europe and has been introduced in the United States as a treatment for pain and postsurgical tissue repair. It has been proposed that laser energy in the red and near-infrared light spectrum may aid in the repair of tissue damage. A proposed mechanism for this therapeutic effect is the stimulation of mitochondria in the cells to produce more energy through the production of adenosine triphosphate.

Studies in humans have investigated the effects of LLLT on both hearing loss and tinnitus, with equivocal results. Some studies have found an improvement in hearing thresholds and tinnitus symptoms.

The Subjects

A total of 35 adult subjects were enrolled in the study. Two subjects withdrew from the study due to loss of interest and/or scheduling difficulty. The data from three additional subjects were not included in the analysis. One subject yielded unreliable audiometric and speech understanding data, speech scores could not be obtained from one subject with a profound hearing loss, and calibration problems compromised data from the third subject. Data from the remaining 30 subjects were included in the analyses. The experimental protocol was approved by the Institutional Review Board of The University of Iowa, and written informed consent was obtained from all participants.

The Device

An Erchonia EHL laser was used to provide the laser stimulation. The device was a portable unit that consisted of a hand-held probe and a main body. The probe contained two laser diodes. One diode produced light in the green part of the visible light spectrum (532 nm wavelength), and the other diode produced light in the red part of the visible light spectrum (635 nm wavelength). Both diodes produced energy levels of 7.5 mW (class IIIb). The laser beams from both diodes were dispersed through lenses to create parallel line-generated beams, rather than spots. A second Erchonia EHL device served as the placebo. It was identical to the treatment device, except that the laser diodes were replaced with nonfunctioning standard light-emitting diodes.

The Groups

The study used three groups: treatment, placebo, and control. Subjects were pseudorandomly assigned to one of the three groups.

Initial group assignment was random with occasional adjustment to ensure that the three groups were similar in terms of number of participants, female/male ratio, mean age of participants, and mean pure-tone audiometric thresholds. The treatment group received the laser treatment protocol using the functional laser device. The placebo group also received the laser treatment protocol, but using the nonfunctioning laser device. The control group made similarly timed visits to the laboratory but received no real or feigned “treatment.” The study used a repeated-measures design, with each subject taking a battery of pretests, followed by treatment followed by a battery of posttests.

Analysis

Data were obtained from both ears of each subject. Since no obvious differences were seen between left and right ears, data from both ears were combined in the following analyses. Strictly speaking, this likely violates the statistical assumption of independent sampling, since the test results from left and right ears of a single subject are likely to be highly correlated. None of the statistical tests used in the analyses are robust to the assumption of independent sampling, and the effect of including both ears is likely to be that of artificially increasing the sample size, making it more likely that a statistically significant result will be found. All statistical tests were conducted using a significance level of .

Conclusions

No statistically significant effect of LLLT on auditory function was found, as assessed by pure-tone audiometry, speech understanding, and TEOAEs in this test. Additionally, no individual subjects showed any clinically significant change. It remains possible that other methods of LLLT could have an effect on hearing. The type of device used was not the best one for this type of study. Further research elucidating the anatomic and physiologic bases for therapeutic effects of LLLT on hearing are needed before further clinical testing is warranted.

More References

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When it Comes to Headaches, Light (Except Green Light) Triggers Pain

One of the Most Disabling Illnesses in the World

Migraines are considered one of the most disabling illnesses in the world,  most of whom are unable to function normally during a migraine. Migraines are much worse than the common headache - bringing on excruciating pain and other symptoms like dizziness, blurred vision, or vomiting.

Green light therapy lamps have been recommended by Harvard Medical School headache specialist Rami Burstein who found that light exacerbates migraines. Photophobia (extreme sensitivity to light) is associated with more than 80% of migraine attacks - but the green light in his research is different. He found that a narrow wavelength of green light is less aggravating than other colors because it sends a smaller, less disruptive signal to the brain via the visual cortex.

Stueids have been recording of dura- and light-sensitive thalamic neurons in rats to show that green activates cone-driven retinal pathways to a lesser extent than white, blue and red; that thalamic neurons are most responsive to blue and least responsive to green; and that cortical responses to green are significantly smaller than those generated by blue, amber and red lights.

"It became apparent that we should be able to use a narrow band of green light to treat photophobia," Burstein says.

Now patients could put their kids to bed, read a book, or enjoy a hearty meal with friends - instead of being isolated in darkness. Not only did green light fail to trigger pain, his research even found that it has a soothing effect.

Can Green Light Relieve Other Pain?

Padma Gulur, who does not work with Burstein, is looking into the possibility that green light might relieve other forms of pain besides migraines. Already one year into a clinical trial - testing the effects of green, blue, or white light on people's post surgery or fibromyalgia pain experience - Gulur says the data looks promising that green light therapy could provide benefit to those in pain. Gulur, a Duke University anesthesiologist, says that finding a way to reduce pain without drugs is essential, given the addictive nature and side effects of opioids and other pain relievers. Not only did green light fail to trigger pain, his research even found that it had a soothing effect.

"We have very few options that are safe, easy to comply with, and have an impact on the pain experience. So it was a quest for non-pharmacological options that could help patients in pain that led to looking at the potential for light-based therapy," she says

Mohab Ibrahim, an anesthesiologist at the University of Arizona, found that when rats were exposed to green light, they felt less pain - or, at least, they were able to tolerate more discomfort in the form of heat or pressure. Wondering which mattered more - the light washing over the skin or contacting the eyes - Irbahim created tiny, rat-sized contact lenses. He found that when rats were wearing the contact lenses, which let only green light through, they similarly showed less discomfort.

Green light exposure has been found to significantly reduce migraine intensity and discomfort from fibromyalgia. In Kaiyan Medical we can create your green light therapy device to treat migraine and other conditions.

More References

https://www.freethink.com/articles/green-light-therapy

https://allaylamp.com/blogs/light-reading/green-light-therapy

https://www.nccih.nih.gov/health/statistics-from-the-national-health-interview-survey

https://sleep.med.harvard.edu/news/356/Green+Light+Affects+Circadian+Rhythm

Healing Muscular Pain with Light Therapy

Light Therapy Healing Muscular Pain

When it comes to pain, we could hardly avert it! Especially the muscle pain. Given that the human body has over 600 muscles, it is tough to avoid muscle pain. Evidently, one out of three Americans is affected by muscle pain annually.

Not only this, Musculoskeletal pain affects around 116 million Americans, which results in poor productivity, missed work or school, fatigue, and lost interest in work.

But doesn’t we treatments for this chronic pain? Of course, we do have several options. Currently, therapies available consist of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, steroid injections, pain medications, and surgery. Each of these has its own specific risk profiles.

What we need now is an effective solution that is less time-consuming, low risk, safe and non-invasive, and yet cost-effective. All these features are available in treatment; we call Low Laser Light Therapy (LLLT). Light therapy has been in the medical field over the past forty years. Light therapy has been demonstrated to lessen inflammation and edema, promote healing in a range of musculoskeletal pathologies. LLLT is being accepted around the globe. This is an advanced, cost-effective, non-invasive therapy for pain that could elevate the quality of life while reducing your financial strains. The causes of muscular pain are numerous. Hence, LLLT helps people from all fields like sports, fitness, medical, and even old age.


Mechanism of LLLT

In this process, light with a wavelength in the red to the near-infrared region of the spectrum (660nm–905nm) is employed on the skin surface. The reason for using these wavelengths is that they have the ability to penetrate the skin and soft/hard tissues. From various conducted clinical trials, this treatment is proven to have a good effect on pain, inflammation, and repairing of the tissues. The therapy goes from 30 to 120 seconds or more a week, depending upon the pain's severity.

Based on the tissue condition, the therapy can go on for weeks or months. LLLT has resulted in relief and reduction of inflammation, pain relief, and accelerated tissue regeneration.

But how does the light actually work?

LLLT in the Treatment of Pain

Do you know that many acute orthopedic conditions such as strains, sprains, muscular back pain, frozen shoulder, neck and back pain, etc., are amenable to Low Laser Light Therapy (LLLT)?

The Infra-Red light relieves pain in a different section of the body and increases relaxation sensation while also comforting the muscles. LLLT has been shown to enhance the multiplication of cells like fibroblasts, keratinocytes, endothelial cells, and lymphocytes. Fibroblasts and keratinocytes are two major cell types that respond to the inflammatory phase in the repair/regeneration process.

LLLT can enhance neovascularization, promote angiogenesis, and increase collagen synthesis to succor in the healing of acute and chronic wounds. The LED light sessions have shown the ability to heal skin, nerves, tendons, cartilage, and bones. Low-intensity LLLT stimulates mitochondria and also enhances the mitochondrial membrane potential.

The peripheral nerve endings of nociceptors (also known as the pain receptors), consisting of the thinly myelinated and unmyelinated, slow-conducting C fibers, lie within the epidermis. This complex network converts harmful stimuli into action potentials. Moreover, these nerve endings lie on the surface or superficial in nature, making the LLLT wavelength penetration work easy.


Hence, with the rise of chronic pain in different countries, it is imperative to validate cost-effective and safe techniques for managing painful conditions, allowing people to live active and productive lives. Light therapy is constantly evolving in relieving muscular pain. It improves the muscle's endurance, reduces muscle soreness, joint pain, and inflammation.

It’s time to let go of the pain!!

Experience the difference with light therapy from Kaiyan Medical.

More References:

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12605431/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27472858/

https://arthritis-research.biomedcentral.com/track/pdf/10.1186/s13075-015-0882-0

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0004951414601276?via%3Dihub

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4743666/

Treating Glaucoma with Green Light Therapy

According to the National Eye Institute, glaucoma is the third leading cause of blindness in the U.S cataracts and macular degeneration rank first and second, respectively. There are an estimated 2,218,000 patients who suffer from glaucoma (approx. 1 in 136 or 0.74%).

What is Glaucoma

Glaucoma is a disease of the optic nerve often caused by an abnormally high pressure the eye (also called IOP, intra-ocular pressure). It is one of the leading factor for blindness. It can occur at any age but is more common for people over the age of 60. The vision loss due to glaucoma can't be recovered and many forms of glaucoma have no warning signs at an early stage, so it is important that we do regular eye exam or get prevention as early as possible.  

Currently, there are 3 Keys that allow for a more accurate diagnosis of glaucoma:
An elevation of intraocular pressure
Changes in the optic nerve
• Peripheral field loss

Diagnosis

Your doctor will review your medical history and conduct a comprehensive eye examination. He or she may perform several tests, including:

  • Measuring intraocular pressure (tonometry)
  • Testing for optic nerve damage with a dilated eye examination and imaging tests
  • Checking for areas of vision loss (visual field test)
  • Measuring corneal thickness (pachymetry)
  • Inspecting the drainage angle (gonioscopy)
Medical Treatment

The damage caused by glaucoma can't be reversed. But treatment and regular checkups can help slow or prevent vision loss, especially if you catch the disease in its early stages.  Glaucoma is treated by lowering your eye pressure (intraocular pressure). Depending on your situation, your options may include prescription eyedrops, oral medications, laser treatment, surgery or a combination of any of these.

However, the method of treatment of glaucoma is mainly of medication, which can lower the intra-ocular pressure, but also many medication would also block aqueous production. It is similar to the condition that a patient with hypertension taking medications to decrease the production of blood to reduce the blood pressure. That is harmful to the eye health.

In Singapore, the mean direct cost of glaucoma treatment with glaucoma medications alone per patient over 10 years was SGD 2042.47 (± 2078.54) or US$1,592.86 (±1620.99), while the mean cost of surgery was SGD 8038.75 (± 2829.4) or US$6,269.18 (± 2206.56) and laser was SGD 1163.63 (± 532.9) or US$907.48 (± 415.59).

Green light therapy is way cheaper and can lead to great results


Green Light Treatment

One of the biggest advantage of light therapy is that there is no side-effect like medication and it can be used at an early stage for prevention.

Scientists and researchers first began to study light therapy in the treatment of glaucoma in 1948. According to R. B. Zaretskaya, MD’s research, published in American Journal of Ophthalmology, it shows that, while the red light has a pressure raising effect, the effects of green light are greater than white light even at a higher brightness. So, green light should be considered a therapy for the reduction of intra-ocular pressure in glaucoma.

The following important experiment was done by R. B. Zaretskaya, MD, also published in the American Journal of Ophthalmology, showed that eye pressure was lowed for patients wearing green spectacles, also with fluctuation of eye pressure decreasing. These patients were required to a 10 minute exposure of green light with an intensity of 1.4 lux. Pressures were then measured at every half hour until pressures returned to baseline.

The conclusion indicates that green light (mu delta) has a pressure lower affect in the majority of patients 82% and the average pressure lower affect was 5 mm Hg and this effect persisted for 4 hours after a brief 10 minute exposure.  

The second article also by R. B. Zaretskaya, MD, which was published in the American Journal of Ophthalmology 1948 31: 985-989 refers about 19 patients that were studied and pressures were determined 3 times a day. Once at 7:00 AM (still in bed), 1:00 PM and then between 7:00 and 8:00 PM. Medications were withheld for a day or two and then green spectacles were given on the second day for full time wear. The spectacles were a hue corresponding to 511 nm and a daylight transparency of 21%. In a certain number of cases, the green spectacles were combined with a greatly reduced strength of pilocarpine. One group had a combination of green glasses and adrenalin (1:1,000) which was also made to test Kravkov’s statement that the installation of adrenalin might increase the eyes sensitivity to green.

Results of this study showed that IOP showed a pronounced tendency to decrease in patients wearing green spectacles.  The fluctuation of IOP during the day was also found to decrease in patients wearing green glasses.  There was an appreciable effect when the use of green spectacles was combined with very small dosages of pilocarpine (0.5 percent).  20 out of 25 eyes had an expressed decrease in IOP as well as a decrease in fluctuations. The pressures decreased by  6.0 mm Hg in 8 cases, 10 mm Hg in 9 cases and 10 mm Hg and more in 3 cases. The results were more striking when combined with small dosages of adrenalin.

Conclusions:
Green spectacles prescribed with a total withdrawal from Pilocarpine produces a decrease in IOP
The affects are most pronounced when used with the administration of small doses of adrenalin
• Mechanism of action is proposed to be on the color receptors of the human eye
• Green light brings about a definite arrangement in the autonomic nervous system and thus affects the neurovascular system of the eye

How to Do a Green Light Therapy Treatment?

Consistency and proper use is key for effective green light therapy. For optimal results with a high-quality device like the ones in Kaiyan, follow these basics for general wellness benefits:

  • Expose your eyes for best results
  • 10-minute treatment each time
  • Daily use is ideal
  • Any time of day
The Future for Green Light and Glaucoma

As we also know that green light could also treat migraine as well as glaucoma, and both migraine and glaucoma are disease of nerve, we may want to know is there connection between these two illness, both of which would cause the pain in the front part of our brain. Hope future research would find out.

References

Conference speech presented at the International Syntonic Light Conference held in St. Pete Beach, Fl , April 28th – May 1st

https://www.healingtheeye.com/Articles/Syntonic_Light_Therapy_Glaucoma.html

https://www.healingtheeye.com/Articles/AJO_IOP_%20light.pdf

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/glaucoma/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20372846#:~:text=Glaucoma%20is%20treated%20by%20lowering,combination%20of%20any%20of%20these.

https://iovs.arvojournals.org/article.aspx?articleid=2360086#:~:text=The%20mean%20direct%20cost%20of,US%24907.48%20(%C2%B1%20415.59).

R. B. Zaretskaya, MD. Intraocular Pressure of Normal and Glaucomatous Eyes as Affected by Accessory Light Stimuli. American Journal of Ophthalmology 1948 – 31-721-727.

Red Light Therapy - 101

We are not just made of biochemical matter. We are charged energy beings, constantly interacting with the environment. Light plays a crucial role in this natural process. Comprehensive new research has unearthed a full new understanding of how our cells function optimally. Food is not the only way we obtain energy; the light also charges us.

Science now shows your body operates like a battery. Certain wavelengths of sunlight power it, and your general health is determined by your ability to receive and maintain a charge. This is what light therapy is about.

What is Red Light Therapy

Light at certain wavelengths is scientifically proven to interact with the body in beneficial ways.

Red light, comprising both red and near-infrared wavelengths, is a unique healing part of the electromagnetic spectrum, and it is one of the most natural ways to charge the body. It is now used as a new form of therapy under the umbrella term Photobiomodulation(PBM)

Red light wavelengths ranging from 600–680nm. Red light boosts the formation of collagen and elastin and assists in cell communication. It penetrates superficially and can be used for skin conditions.

Near-Infrared wavelengths ranging from 750–850nm. NIR stimulates healing, increases mitochondrial function, and improves blood flow and tissue oxygenation. It penetrates deeper into the body.

A high-quality home device like those produced by Kaiyan uses medical-grade LEDs to shine natural red and near-infrared light on your body. Like the wavelengths of light your body needs from natural sunlight, without the heat or UV rays that cause sun damage and without the need for sunny weather. Check the list of best light therapy masks.

How to Recharge your Body

Electric charge is a fundamental property of the body. The surfaces in our bodies — such as membranes, proteins, and DNA — are all charged, negatively or positively, depending on whether they lose or gain electrons.

At the core of your body’s power to heal itself are sub-cellar organelles called mitochondria. The number of mitochondria in a cell varies widely by organism, tissue, and cell type and are concentrated in organs with high energy demands such as the brain, heart, liver, skin, and muscles.

This is because mitochondria generate most of the body's chemical energy supply via the ATP (adenosine triphosphate). They also regulate various other tasks, such as signaling, cellular differentiation, and maintaining control of the cell cycle and cell growth. This is why they are often referred to as the powerhouse of the cell.

Mitochondria
  1. LED light at a wavelength from 600–680nm(red) and between 810–850nm(infrared) is delivered to the tissue via the red light therapy device.
  2. The light enters the cell’s mitochondria and is absorbed by the chromophores, including the protein cytochrome c oxidase(CCO) and EZ water, increasing its activity.
  3. As a result of this highlighted activity, three molecules are affected. Adenosine Triphosphate(ATP), Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), and Nitric Oxide (NO).
Water

Approximately 70% of our body weight and 99% of our bodies ’ molecules are made of water, and this water is in a charged state.

Recent research by Prof Gerald Pollock of the University of Washington has shown that water adjacent to a cell or mitochondrial membrane is so-called structured water. This is also called EZ (exclusion zone) water because it creates a separation of charge. Positive proton is excluded and pushed to the bulk water, and a lattice-like negatively charged water for near the membrane. This increases the voltage across the membrane—this charge separation of water in the body functions as the positive and negative poles of a battery.

What Does “Red Light Therapy” Mean?

As a term, “red light therapy” refers to treatments from LEDs or cold lasers that deliver wavelengths of natural red and near-infrared light.

The term does not include white light, blue light, or blue LED masks, and it is not the same as full-spectrum light. Some people may include infrared or far-infrared wavelengths along with red light therapy, but those are typically used in dry saunas because of their ability to produce heat. Red light therapy does not rely on heat, a major difference between natural light treatments and heat-based modalities like an infrared sauna, traditional sauna, or other heat therapy type.

Generally, “red light therapy” describes natural light treatments that deliver the same therapeutic red and near-infrared wavelengths as natural sunlight. This differs from artificial light treatments like tanning — or bright light therapy from light therapy lamps, lightboxes, or happy-light if you’re interested in natural light treatments for seasonal affective disorder.

The following terms may also call red light therapy: RLT, photobiomodulation (PBM), phototherapy, LED therapy, LED light therapy, infrared therapy, low-level laser therapy, or low-level light therapy (LLLT).

A Multilevel Treatment

Red light therapy works on multiple levels in the body.

Molecular

  • Chromophores, cytochrome c oxidase, water, opsins
  • Retrograde mitochondrial signaling
  • Light-sensitive ion channels
  • Adenosine triphosphate ATP
  • Reactive Oxygen Species ROS

Calcium

  • Heat-shock proteins
  • Melatonin
  • Brain-derived neurotrophic factor
  • Gene transcription factors
  • Akt/mTOR/CyclinD1 pathway

Cellular

  • Inflammation, Cytoprotection, Proliferation
  • Protein synthesis
  • Stem cell production and migration
  • Immune cell viability
  • Retrograde mitochondrial signaling
  • Transforming growth factor
  • Pro-and anti-inflammatory cytokines
  • Vascular endothelial
  • Mitochondrial membrane potential

Tissue

  • Muscles: Increase endurance, tone density
  • Brain: Improves cognition and immune
  • Nerves: Repair and pain relief
  • Healing: Bones, tendons, and wounds
  • Hair: Increases growth
  • Skin: Improvements of the collagen network, anti-aging, skin disorders
  • Fat: Fat re-absorption improved by enhanced micro-circulation
  • Lymph: Improved immunity
Systemic Effects

Red light therapy affects multiple bodily systems:

Fascia

The fascia is a complex web of sensitive and highly interconnected connective tissue beneath the skin that attaches, stabilizes, encloses, and separates muscles and other internal organs.

Fascia is primarily made from hydrated collagen-Protein chains in a triple helix formation surrounded by water, with a capacity to generate an electric charge in response to applied mechanical stress (piezoelectric).

The bio-electrical nature of the collagen-rich matrix is the key to understanding how pathological changes in one part of the body may cause a cascade of “remote effects” in seemingly unrelated areas and organ systems. The fascia is the long-overlooked but absolutely crucial interconnecting organ of the human body. The therapeutic effect of red light energy can be carried through the fascia network to other parts of the body where it is needed. This is turn, elevates the body’s capacity to communicate via this charged matrix in a positive feedback loop.

The well-known energy meridians of traditional Chinese medicine may actually be low resistance pathways operating through the fascia, conveying energy to the rest of the body.

Gut-Brain Axis

The gut-brain axis links the emotional and cognitive center of the brain with peripheral intestinal functions. Red light energy applied to the abdomen area can therefore influence mood and neuropsychological issues via several mechanisms:

  • Reduction in bowel inflammation and gut spasms.
  • Stimulation of neurotransmitters and hormones in the gut, including serotonin, leptin, and ghrelin.
  • Modulation of the micro-biome. The gut microbes are sensitive to light energy and respond to light energy with differences in growth, migration, and proliferation of the different species.
  • The increasing availability of neurotransmitters activates the brain’s immune system, increases blood flow, and removes toxins.
  • Increased blood circulation and reduced blood pressure leading to a reduction of anxiety and brain fog.
  • Modulation of the vagus nerve, one of the biggest nerves connecting the gut and brain. This plays an important role in stress and social communication, communicating motor and sensory impulses to every organ in the body.

Immune System

Beaming red light and near-infrared light onto cells creates a short, low-dose metabolic stress that builds up the cells' anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and natural defense systems, making the body stronger and more resilient to infections.

This is the concept of hormesis; safe, low-level exposure to stressor results in increased resistance to illness. Red light has been shown to influence the immune response in several ways:

  • Activation of the mast cells leading to the movement of leukocytes and reduced inflammation.
  • Mast cell DE-granulation and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines.
  • Increased infiltration of the tissues by leukocytes.
  • Enhanced proliferation, maturation, and motility of fibroblasts
  • Increased production of fibroblast growth factor.
  • Lymphocyte activation and proliferation.
  • Macro-phages activated to act as phagocytes.

Circulatory System

Red light therapy has been shown to aid the circulatory system's functioning and increase the micro-circulation of blood, one of the most recognized and well-documented effects of this therapy.

Red light stimulates the formation of new capillaries carrying more oxygen to the body.

A good oxygen supply is intricately involved in numerous biological processes, including cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and protein synthesis, required to restore tissue function and integrity.

Increased circulation allows for waste products to be carried away more effectively. It triggers and heightens the body’s own scavenging process for and ingesting degenerated cells for clean-up.

In fact, increased micro-circulation of blood is thought to be the most vital function for healing the body for almost every illness. For general well-being, Nutrient-rich blood and efficient waste removal is strongly linked to good health.

Nervous System

The nervous system is a complex electrical system, including the brain and spinal cord. It collects, processes, and responds to the input of energy-be it light, sound, heat, or pressure — and it relays these messages to the brain and around the body.

Red light energy affects the nervous system in several crucial ways:

  • Myelination of fibers and a better lamellar organization of the myelin sheath.
  • Improvement of electrophysiological function.
  • Facilitation of neural regeneration.
  • Release of growth factors.
  • Increase of vascular network and collagen.
  • Faster regeneration of nerve lesions and functional improvement of damaged nerves.

The peripheral nerves can be damaged by infection or high sugar levels in the case of diabetic neuropathy.

Red light therapy is being explored as a promising drug-free therapy for all kinds of nerve damage.

Stem Cells

At the frontier of science, red light therapy shows huge promise in current research to stimulate the growth of stem cells in the body and maximize the effect of stem cell implantation for a wide variety of medical purposes.

Therefore, red light may be useful after surgery to stimulate stem cells to aid the repair of tissues and possibly organs.

Light at certain wavelengths has also been shown to coax stem cells to repair teeth, so red light therapy could soon revolutionize dental treatments. Indeed, some progressive dental clinics now offer red light therapy as an alternative to conventional drug and drill treatments.

Red light therapy has been shown to stimulate mesenchymal stem cells in the bone marrow to enhance their capacity to infiltrate the brain.

This has implications for healing degenerative conditions such as dementia, Alzheimer’s, and Parkinson’s disease , currently lacking any orthodox treatment solution.

Where Did Red Light Therapy Come From?

Red light therapy has become a popular natural health intervention, both in professional settings and with home devices.

Light therapy technology has been used in medicine for decades, and NASA experimented with red light therapy use in space in the 1980s and 1990s. In the last 10–20 years, red light therapy has become more widely used thanks to breakthroughs in LED lighting technology that have made affordable home devices possible.

Major advances in clinical light therapy research, and increased public interest in natural health technologies, have also contributed to the growing use and popularity of red light therapy.

In 2016, Kaiyan Medical was the first red light therapy manufacturer to offer affordable, medical-grade devices to consumers for convenient, at-home use.

Relieve Pain And Discomfort

In humans, photobiomodulation is reportedly effective against various pain conditions, including mucositis, carpal tunnel syndrome, orthodontic pain, temporomandibular joint pain, neck pain, neuropathic pain from amputation, and menstrual cramps.

Red light therapy significantly reduces the severity of pain hypersensitivity while improving sensorimotor function.

These improvements are preceded by an anti-inflammatory microglia/macrophage cell population in the injury zone, thereby providing a lasting pain relief effect.

Red light therapy has been shown to yield effective pain relief via the modulation of multiple mechanisms:

  • Inhibitory cyclooxygenase and prostaglandins
  • Modulating nerve transmission
  • Increasing endorphins serotonin release
  • Stimulating metabolism
  • Activating peripheral opioid receptors
Repair Skin

Red light therapy is used for the rapid and safe healing of wounds from burns, surgery incisions, scars, diabetic neuropathy, ulcers, and bedsores.

Faster and better wound healing was one of NASA’s original findings and one of the key recognized uses for this technology. Red and near-infrared light promote beneficial effects during all four phases of the wound-healing process:

  • Coagulation
  • Inflammation
  • Migration
  • Remodeling

These processes are regulated by many growth factors connected with nitric oxide (NO) signaling release, which is modulated by light energy.

A major typical inhibiting factor for the body’s ability to recover from a wound is low oxygen flow. Therefore, the unique ability of red light to increase oxygen flow to the affected area has a massive effect on the healing process.

By reducing inflammation, oxygenation of the area, and formation of new blood vessels, a rapid healing process unfolds with less pain and scarring.

Red light energy may also reduce or prevent the need for pharmaceutical painkiller medication during the healing process.

Revive Immunity

If your body is energized on a cellular level and communication between the organ systems is efficient, your body will naturally develop disease resistance.

Your immune defense works to fend off bacteria and viruses all the time. Red light therapy boosts this system in several ways.

It releases nitric oxide and melatonin, which are involved in DNA repair and have a powerful antimicrobial effect.

It also works through a process known as hormesis. When red and near-infrared light is beamed into cells, it causes mild metabolic stress, which results in cells engaging their anti-inflammatory and antioxidant response.

In this way, the body is primed and ready to respond better to infections. Boosted immunity is also a natural consequence of other systemic effects of red light therapy.

Studies have shown a variety of benefits to the immune system:

  • Improved melatonin production
  • Improved antioxidant production
  • Increased micro-circulation enabling the transportation of immune cells.
  • Promotes activity in the lymph nodes
  • Increased NO levels
  • Better flow of neurotransmitters
  • Boosted collagen and elastin production
  • The more efficient function of cells and organelles
  • Boosts T cells pre-operatively
  • Improved thyroid function
Reduce Inflammation

Inflammation can be acute and topical ( short-lived, caused by accidents, sprains, and infections ), chronic and general ( long-term, caused by persistent conditions ).

While acute inflammation is a healthy physical healing response, chronic and general inflammation can be detrimental to health and often goes undetected.

Currently, the main treatment for inflammation in the body is NSAID or steroid drugs, both of which have side effects and disrupt the body's healing process. Red light therapy stimulates the body to activate its own healing mechanism, dramatically reducing the health risks associated with long term drug use.

Red light therapy works by decreasing the number of inflammatory cells, increasing fibroblast proliferation ( the cell that synthesizes the extra-cellular matrix and collagen ), stimulating angiogenesis ( the formation of new blood vessels ), and activating the body’s innate anti-inflammatory, antioxidant defenses.

The following conditions, associated with chronic and acute inflammation, are currently being investigated as highly promising targets for red light therapy.

  • Arthritis
  • Asthma
  • Sinusitis
  • Muscular sprains
  • Fibro-myalgia
  • Neuron inflammatory disorders such as Alzheimer’s
  • Irritable bowel syndrome and colitis
  • Rheumatic conditions
Regain Performance

Red light therapy has become a hot topic in sports and performance. Not only is it safe and non-toxic-it yields rapid and lasting results in many areas of application.

Besides the overwhelmingly beneficial effects on health overall, red light therapy supports muscle growth and repair by increasing the amount of ATP available, which allows for better performance and faster recovery.

Red light therapy used before training is known to prepare and strengthen the body and physical exertion to help with recovery.

Documented effects from red light therapy include:

  • Reducing DOMS ( Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness )
  • Greater endurance and performance
  • Improving sleep quality
  • Increasing sexual function and libido ( Including Testosterone )
  • Aiding weight loss
  • Boosting cognitive function
  • Reversing skin aging
  • Reducing cellulite
Red Light Therapy for Depression and Seasonal Affective Disorder

Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a type of depression that impacts at least 5% of Americans, especially in the winter months, when natural light exposure is lowest. SAD is also called seasonal depression, winter depression, or the winter blues.

Some people treat SAD symptoms with treatment options like bright white light therapies that mimic the sun’s light intensity at a bright time of day.

More researchers and physicians have used natural light treatments like red light therapy to help with natural light deficiency and the winter blues in recent years in conjunction with antidepressant medication and psychotherapy.

Who Uses Red Light Therapy?

In addition to the growing number of people using red light therapy devices in their home, red light therapy systems can be found in many professional and clinical settings:

Skincare Professionals: Red light therapy is a popular skin treatment among Hollywood celebrities for anti-aging, and it’s used by leading skincare professionals like estheticians and dermatologists to treat skin conditions and promote collagen production.

Health Practitioners: Red light therapy is an emerging subspecialty of medicine in a wide range of fields. From oncologists treating cancer side effects, to dentists reducing oral inflammation, to physicians treating mental health conditions, red light therapy is becoming more widespread in clinical practice.

Natural Health Experts: Leading voices in natural health and wellness like Dr. Sarah Ballantyne, Dave Asprey, and Ben Greenfield use red light therapy. So do Paleo and Keto health experts like Mark Sisson, Dr. Anthony Gustin, Luke Storey, and Robb Wolf.

Sports Medicine Pros: Light therapy companies work side by side with the National Association of Sports Medicine (NASM), and red light therapy is used to heal sports injuries by sports medicine professionals across the globe. Including the top trainers and doctors on the PGA Tour, like Dr. Troy Van Biezen and Dr. Ara Suppiah.

Elite Pro Athletes: Red light therapy is a popular training tool across pro sports, from NFL stars like Patrick Peterson, to UFC champs like Anthony Pettis, to gold medal gymnast Sanne Wevers.

Fitness & Training: World-class personal trainers like Lacey Stone and Jorge Cruise use red light therapy to both enhance performance and improve the muscle recovery process.

Supportive Cancer Care: The Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC) recommends red light therapy for the treatment of oral mucositis (OM), a common and debilitating symptom of cancer treatment.

Sources and References:

Klepeis N., Nelson W., Ott W., Robinson J., Tsang A., Switzer P., Behar J., Hern S., Engelmann W. “The National Human Activity Pattern Survey (NHAPS): a resource for assessing exposure to environmental pollutants”. Journal of Exposure Analysis and Environmental Epidemiology 2001.

Hamblin M. “Mechanisms and applications of the anti-inflammatory effects of photobiomodulation.” AIMS Biophys. 2017.

LED Lights Used in Plant Growth Experiments for Deep Space Missions. NASA.

Gál P,  Stausholm MB, et al. Should open excisions and sutured incisions be treated differently? A review and meta-analysis of animal wound models following low-level laser therapy. Lasers in Medical Science. 2018 Aug.

John Foley, David B Vasily, et al. 830 nm light-emitting diode (led) phototherapy significantly reduced return-to-play in injured university athletes: a pilot study. Laser Therapy. 2016 Mar.

Kim HK, Choi JH. Effects of radiofrequency, electroacupuncture, and low-level laser therapy on the wrinkles and moisture content of the forehead, eyes, and cheek. Journal of Physical Therapy Science. 2017 February.

Wunsch A and Matuschka K. A Controlled Trial to Determine the Efficacy of Red and Near-Infrared Light Treatment in Patient Satisfaction, Reduction of Fine Lines, Wrinkles, Skin Roughness, and Intradermal Collagen Density Increase. Photomedicine and Laser Surgery. Feb 2014.

Barolet D, Roberge CJ, et al. Regulation of skin collagen metabolism in vitro using a pulsed 660 nm LED light source: clinical correlation with a single-blinded study. Journal of Investigative Dermatology. 2009 December.

Morita T., Tokura H. “ Effects of lights of different color temperature on the nocturnal changes in core temperature and melatonin in humans” Journal of Physiological Anthropology. 1996, Sept.

Naeser M., Zafonte R, Krengel MH, Martin PI,  Frazier J, Hamblin MR, Knight JA, Meehan WP, Baker EH. “Significant improvements in cognitive performance post-transcranial, red/near-infrared light-emitting diode treatments in chronic, mild traumatic brain injury: open-protocol study”  Journal of Neurotrauma. 2014, June.

Liu KH, Liu D, et al. “Comparative effectiveness of low-level laser therapy for adult androgenic alopecia: a system review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.” Lasers in Medical Science. 2019 Aug.

Gupta AK, Mays RR, et al. “Efficacy of non-surgical treatments for androgenetic alopecia: a systematic review and network meta-analysis.” JEADV. 2018 Dec.

Afifi L, Maranda EL, et al. “Low-level laser therapy as a treatment for androgenetic alopecia.” Lasers in Surgery and Medicine. 2017 Jan.

Hofling DB, Chavantes MC, et al. Low-level laser in the treatment of patients with hypothyroidism induced by chronic autoimmune thyroiditis: a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Lasers in Surgery and Medicine. May 2013.

Hofling DB, Chavantes MC, et al. Assessment of the effects of low-level laser therapy on the thyroid vascularization of patients with autoimmune hypothyroidism by color Doppler ultrasound. ISRN Endocrinology. 2012.

Hofling DB, Chavantes MC, et al. Low-level laser therapy in chronic autoimmune thyroiditis: a pilot study. Lasers in Surgery and Medicine. 2010 Aug.

Vladimirovich Moskvin S., Ivanovich Apolikhin O. Effectiveness of low level laser therapy for treating male infertility. Biomedicine (Taipei). 2018 June.

Ban Frangez H., Frangez I., Verdenik I., Jansa V., Virant Klun I. Photobiomodulation with light-emitting diodes improves sperm motility in men with asthenozoospermia. Laser in Medical Science, 2015 Jan.

Salman Yazdi, R., Bakhshi, S., Jannat Alipoor, F. et al. Effect of 830-nm diode laser irradiation on human sperm motility. Lasers Med Sci. 2014.

Chow KW, Preece D, Burns MW. Effect of red light on optically trapped spermatozoa. Biomedical Optics Express. 2017 Aug.

Preece D., Chow KW, Gomez-Godinez V., Gustafson K., et al. Red light improves spermatozoa motility and does not induce oxidative DNA damage. Scientific Reports. 2017 Apr.

American Psychiatric Association

Cassano P, Petrie SR, et al. Transcranial Photobiomodulation for the Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder. The ELATED-2 Pilot Trial. Photomedicine and Laser Surgery. 2018 October.

Barrett DW, et al. Transcranial infrared laser stimulation produces beneficial cognitive and emotional effects in humans. 2013 Jan.

Blanco NJ, Maddox WT, Gonzalez-Lima F. Improving executive function using transcranial infrared laser stimulation. Journal of Neuropsychology. 2017 Mar.

Paolillo FR, Borghi-Silva A, et al. New treatment of cellulite with infrared-LED illumination applied during high-intensity treadmill training. J Cosmet Laser Ther. 2011 Aug;13(4):166-71.

Caruso-Davis MK, Guillot TS, Podichetty VK, Mashtalir N, Dhurandhar NV, Dubuisson O, Yu Y. Efficacy of low-level laser therapy for body contouring and spot fat reduction. Obes Surg. 2011. Jun;21(6):722-9.

Jackson RF, Dedo DD, Roche GC, et al. Low-level laser therapy as a non-invasive approach for body contouring: a randomized, controlled study. Lasers in Surgery and Medicine. Dec 2009;41(10):99-809.

McRae E and Boris J. Independent evaluation of low-level laser therapy at 635 nm for non-invasive body contouring of the waist, hips, and thighs. Lasers in Surgery and Medicine. Jan 2013.

Avci P, Gupta A, et al. Low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) in skin: stimulating, healing, restoring. Seminars in Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery. Mar 2013; 32(1): 41-52.

Light Therapy Helping the Crisis that’s Being Ignored: PTSD

Post-traumatic Stress Disorder

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental health condition that’s triggered by a terrifying event — either experiencing it or witnessing it. Symptoms may include flashbacks, nightmares, and severe anxiety, as well as uncontrollable thoughts about the event.

Most people who go through traumatic events may have temporary difficulty adjusting and coping, but with time and good self-care, they usually get better. If the symptoms get worse, last for months or even years, and interfere with your day-to-day functioning, you may have PTSD.

Getting effective treatment after PTSD symptoms develop can be critical to reduce symptoms and improve function.

PTSD symptoms are generally grouped into four types: intrusive memories, avoidance, negative changes in thinking and mood, and changes in physical and emotional reactions. Symptoms can vary over time or vary from person to person

The Light Helper, the EMDR Therapy

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy is an interactive psychotherapy technique used to relieve psychological stress. It is an effective treatment for trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

During EMDR therapy sessions, you relive traumatic or triggering experiences in brief doses while the therapist directs your eye movements.

EMDR is thought to be effective because recalling distressing events is often less emotionally upsetting when your attention is diverted. This allows you to be exposed to the memories or thoughts without having a strong psychological response.

Over time, this technique is believed to lessen the impact that the memories or thoughts have on you.

What are the Benefits of EMDR Therapy?

People who are dealing with traumatic memories and those who have PTSD are thought to benefit the most from EMDR therapy.

It’s thought to be particularly effective for those who struggle to talk about their past experiences.

Although there is not sufficient research to prove its effectiveness in these areas, EMDR therapy is also being used to treat:

How Does EMDR Therapy Work?

EMDR therapy is broken down into eight different phases, so you’ll need to attend multiple sessions. Treatment usually takes about 12 separate sessions.

Phase 1: History and treatment planning

Your therapist will first review your history and decide where you are in the treatment process. This evaluation phase also includes talking about your trauma and identifying potential traumatic memories to treat specifically.

Phase 2: Preparation

Your therapist will then help you learn several different ways to cope with the emotional or psychological stress you’re experiencing.

Stress management techniques such as deep breathing and mindfulness may be used.

Phase 3: Assessment

During the third phase of EMDR treatment, your therapist will identify the specific memories that will be targeted and all the associated components (such as the physical sensations that are stimulated when you concentrate on an event) for each target memory.

Phases 4–7: Treatment

Your therapist will then begin using EMDR therapy techniques to treat your targeted memories. During these sessions, you will be asked to focus on a negative thought, memory, or image.

Your therapist will simultaneously have you do specific eye movements. The bilateral stimulation may also include taps or other movements mixed in, depending on your case.

After the bilateral stimulation, your therapist will ask you to let your mind go blank and notice the thoughts and feelings you’re having spontaneously. After you identify these thoughts, your therapist may have you refocus on that traumatic memory, or move on to another.

If you become distressed, your therapist will help bring you back to the present before moving on to another traumatic memory. Over time, the distress over particular thoughts, images, or memories should start to fade.

Phase 8: Evaluation

In the final phase, you’ll be asked to evaluate your progress after these sessions. Your therapist will do the same.

How Effective is EMDR Therapy?

Multiple independent and controlled studies have shown that EMDR therapy is an effective treatment for PTSD. It’s even one of the Department of Veterans Affairs’ strongly recommended options to treat PTSD.

A 2012 study of 22 people found that EMDR therapy helped 77 percent of the individuals with a psychotic disorder and PTSD. It found that their hallucinations, delusions, anxiety, and depression symptoms were significantly improved after treatment. The study also found that symptoms were not exacerbated during treatment.

An older study trusted Source that compared EMDR therapy to typical prolonged exposure therapy, found that EMDR therapy was more effective in treating symptoms. The study also found that EMDR therapy had a lower dropout rate from participants. Both, however, offered a reduction in the symptoms of traumatic stress, including both anxiety and depression.

Several small studies have also found evidence that EMDR therapy is not only effective in the short term but that its effects can be maintained long term. One 2004 study evaluated people several months after they were given either “standard care” (SC) treatment for PTSD or EMDR therapy.

During and immediately after treatment, they noticed that EMDR was significantly more efficient in reducing symptoms of PTSD. During the three- and six-month follow-ups, they also recognized that participants maintained these benefits long after the treatment had ended. Overall, the study found that EMDR therapy gave people a longer-lasting reduction in symptoms than SC.

EMDR therapy has proven to be effective in treating trauma and PTSD. It may also be able to help treat other mental conditions like anxiety, depression, and panic disorders.

Some people may prefer this treatment to prescription medications, which can have unexpected side effects. Others may find that EMDR therapy strengthens the effectiveness of their medications. In Kaiyan Medical, we can help you create your own EMDR therapy device.

References
  • Berg DP, et al. (2012). Treating trauma in psychosis with EMDR: A pilot study. DOI:
    10.1016/j.jbtep.2011.09.011
  • Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing therapy. (2017).
    apa.org/ptsd-guideline/treatments/eye-movement-reprocessing.aspx
  • Hase M, et al. (2015). Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) therapy in the treatment of depression: A matched pairs study in an inpatient setting. DOI:
    10.1002/brb3.342
  • Ironson G, et al. (2002). Comparison of two treatments for traumatic stress: A community-based study of EMDR and prolonged exposure.
    ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11748600
  • Oren E, et al. (2012). EMDR therapy: An overview of its development and mechanisms of action. DOI:
    10.1016/j.erap.2012.08.005
  • Shapiro, F. (2014). The role of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) therapy in medicine: Addressing the psychological and physical symptoms stemming from adverse life experiences. DOI:
    10.7812/TPP/13–098

Breast Milk and Light Therapy, the Timekeepers

We live in a 24-hour environment, in which light and darkness follow a diurnal pattern. Our circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) in the hypothalamus, is entrained to the 24-hour solar day via a pathway from the retina and synchronizes our internal biological rhythms. Once we come to this world, one of the first things we need, is food. Naturally, as mammals(from Latin mamma “breast”), we feed ourselves from the breast. But, Human breast milk is more than a meal — it’s also a clock, providing time-of-day information to infants. The composition of breast milk changes across the day, giving energizing morning milk a different cocktail of ingredients than soothing evening milk. Researchers believe this “chrononutrition” may help program infants’ emerging circadian biology, the internal timekeeper that allows babies to distinguish day from night.

What happens, though, when babies drink milk that does not come directly from the breast but is pumped at different times of the day and stored in advance of feeding? Scientists have rarely considered the potential effects of “mistimed” milk on infants’ development, but the implications are potentially far-reaching.

In the same way, rhythmic variations in ambient illumination impact behaviors such as rest during sleep and activity during wakefulness as well as their underlying biological processes. The availability of artificial light has substantially changed the light environment, especially during the evening and night hours. Phones, laptops, ipads, and more around the babies. This may increase the risk of developing circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders (CRSWD), which are often caused by a misalignment of endogenous circadian rhythms and external light-dark cycles. On the other hand, light can also be used as an effective and non-invasive therapeutic option with little to no side effects, to improve sleep, mood, and general well-being.

The architecture of the circadian system

The central master-clock in mammalian species is a paired structure in the hypothalamus with a volume of just about 0.25 mm3 per nucleus. Within the mammalian SCN, a molecular oscillator keeps the clock oscillating at its normal pace. The basis of this oscillator is two interconnected molecular feedback loops of clock gene expression, a detailed description of which is beyond the scope of this review though.

Successful interaction between body and environment however needs more than just a central clock; it also requires input pathways relaying information about the environment and the body to the SCN to achieve adequate entrainment as well as output pathways communicating timing information to the body to synchronize bodily processes with the circadian phase

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Sleep, eating, and energy levels all show circadian rhythms, which means they follow a daily cycle. As any parent who has sleepwalked through a 3 a.m. feeding knows, infants are not born with these rhythms fully set. Instead, their sense of day and night develops over the first weeks and months of life, thanks to cues like sunlight and darkness.

Babies vary: Some show predictable circadian fluctuations in hormones linked with alertness, sleep, and appetite, and can sleep for long stretches shortly after birth, whereas others seem to have their daily rhythms upside-down for months. Delays in the development of circadian biology can increase the risk of colic and lead to growth and feeding problems.

Breast milk may help program infant circadian rhythms, helping to explain why some parents of newborns enjoy long full nights of sleep, whereas others struggle to get their infants on a schedule.

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Dynamic Milk

Breast milk changes dramatically over the course of the day. For example, levels of cortisol — a hormone that promotes alertness — are three times higher in morning milk than in evening milk. Melatonin, which promotes sleep and digestion, can barely be detected in daytime milk, but rises in the evening and peaks around midnight.

Night milk also contains higher levels of certain DNA building blocks which help promote healthy sleep. Day milk, by contrast, has more activity-promoting amino acids than night milk. Iron in milk peaks at around noon; vitamin E peaks in the evening. Minerals like magnesium, zinc, potassium, and sodium are all highest in the morning.

Daytime milk may pack a special immune punch. Among mothers who provided researchers with milk samples across the first month postpartum, immune components — including key antibodies and white blood cells — looked higher in day milk compared to night milk. Another study found higher levels of a component important for immune system communication in day milk compared to night milk.

While it’s clear that milk changes over the course of the day, scientists know little about what this means for infant health. Researchers do know that the hormones and immune components in breast milk are passed along to infants and that infants are starting to develop and refine their own circadian rhythms during the first months of life. It’s plausible that the chronosignals in breast milk would help to shape infants’ own circadian biology. Differences in infant feeding patterns might help explain why there’s such variability in the development of these daily rhythms from one infant to another.

Fundamentals of light

To understand the effects of light on human physiology, it is important to understand light. Briefly, light is radiation in a specific range of the electromagnetic spectrum.

The spectrum of daylight, which is light from the sun filtered by the atmosphere is relatively broadband in its distribution. The availability of daylight depends on geographical location and season. In the timeframe of human evolution, it is a rather recent development that light can be available during all times of day through artificial light. Artificial light allows for illuminating indoor and outdoor spaces. It comes in many forms, e.g. incandescent, fluorescent, or light-emitting diode (LED) lighting.

While light generated by these technologies may all appear “white”, the underlying spectra are rather different.

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The reason why many different types of spectra might have the same appearance lies in the retina. Critically, different spectra, even if they create the same visual impression, may vary in their chronobiological effects on the circadian clock.

Recently, the Commission International de l’Eclairage (CIE), the international standard body for quantities related to light, issued a new standard containing a reference framework for quantifying the effects of light on non-visual functions.

Effects of LED light on the circadian clock

Two effects of light have been interrogated extensively in human circadian and sleep research: (1) the acute suppression of melatonin in response to light exposure and (2) the ability of light exposure to shift circadian phase.

The system mediating melatonin suppression has a spectral sensitivity that is broadly consistent with the spectral sensitivity of melanopsin. Similarly, the spectral sensitivity of circadian phase-shifting shows its maximal effect near the peak spectral sensitivity of melanopsin.

The effects of light on the phase of the circadian clock depend on the timing of light exposure. This is formally summarised in the phase response curve (PRC), which describes the amount of phase shift (in minutes and hours) achieved by exposure of light at a given circadian phase. Roughly speaking, the effect of morning light is that it advances the clock, while evening and night light delays the clock.

Both melatonin suppression and circadian phase shifts are modulated by the “photic history”, i.e. the amount of light seen during the day. The long-term adaptive influences of the “spectral diet” in the real world remain an important area of investigation.

Effects of light on sleep

The human sleep-wake cycle, which is periods of sleep during the night and wakefulness during the day, is one of the most prominent examples of a circadian behavioral pattern, especially for babies. It results from the interaction between two factors: the circadian drive for wakefulness and the homeostatic sleep pressure. The activity of the circadian pacemaker is aligned to counteract the increasing sleep pressure resulting from sustained wakefulness during the daytime. Likewise, the nocturnal increase in circadian sleep tendency counteracts the decrease in sleep propensity resulting from accumulated sleep thereby supporting a consolidated phase of nocturnal sleep.

Breast milk, artificial lighting, smartphones, and visual display units

In addition to natural daylight, babies are nowadays also exposed to a considerable amount of artificial light. This is particularly the case in the evening hours, i.e. when the circadian system is most sensitive to light-induced phase delays. Thereby, light therapy is more efficient to delay the timing of the circadian clock and thus sleep.

Even thou, mothers can label their milk with the time it was pumped and coordinate infant feedings to offer morning milk in the morning, afternoon milk in the afternoon, and night milk at night, they keep the constant use of visual units around the baby. The use for the babies is not different, entertainment as well

So, which one is better?

Is always about finding the balance. Rather than only use one of the methods, the responsible practice of light therapy and adequate alimentation of your newborn should be combined to get on track the circadian system

References

Achermann P, Dijk D-J, Brunner DP, et al. A model of human sleep homeostasis based on EEG slow-wave activity: Quantitative comparison of data and simulations. Brain Res Bull. 1993;31:97–113. doi: 10.1016/0361–9230(93)90016–5. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]

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http://sleepeducation.org/treatment-therapy/bright-light-therapy

Breastfeeding may improve nocturnal sleep and reduce infantile colic: Potential role of breast milk…

Melatonin is secreted during the night in adults but not in infants. It has a hypnotic effect as well as a relaxing…

doi.org

https://doi.org/10.2147/NSS.S125992

Breast Milk Is Teeming With Bacteria - That's Good for the Baby

Breast-fed milk may nourish a baby's microbiome in ways that bottled breast milk can't. In the earliest days after…

www.nytimes.com

https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2008-1315c

The Sleeping Beauty Secret: The Red Light Therapy

Lack of sleep is a villain in America and Europe. Light intake is a big part of the problem. Over 65% of adults say they don’t get enough good sleep every week. Most people also don’t get nearly enough natural light for optimal health: the average American spends over 90% of their time indoors.

In addition to not getting enough natural light, people today are surrounded by artificial blue light from screens and overhead lighting. An overload of artificial blue light can cause headaches and make it harder to get to sleep and stay asleep. When we take in all that bright blue light from laptops, TVs, and phones, especially before we go to bed, our bodies get the signal that it's time to be awake, even if we're tired.

Melatonin is the naturally-occurring hormone that regulates sleep and wakefulness. Emerging research is showing that red light therapy treatments can help people produce more of their own, natural melatonin than exposure to other light sources like blue light. Red light therapy is natural light. It’s much less bright than blue light, with a lower color temperature than daytime sun, as the image above shows. Research has shown that red light doesn’t upset your sleep cycle like bright blue light. Red light therapy is showing great clinical results for people with insomnia and sleep disorders.

The light therapy is a simple, non-invasive treatment that delivers concentrated natural light to your skin and cells. Clinical research is showing that red light therapy can improve sleep quality and duration, and help people produce more of their own melatonin.

Light plays a major role in your sleep cycle. The body’s circadian clock interprets light as a sign of when to sleep and when to be awake. Artificial blue light from phones, computers, and other screens is extremely bright and can knock your circadian rhythm out of whack. Red light has the opposite effect: it’s ideal for evenings because it has a low color temperature—far lower than blue light and much closer to the natural sunset.

Red light therapy treatments are quick and simple: you just sit or stand in natural light for 5 to 15 minutes, ideally every day. This stimulates your mitochondria and gives your cells the natural light they need to make energy.

How Does Red Light Therapy Help You Sleep?

Natural light is a key ingredient for a healthy circadian rhythm and restful sleep. If you struggle to sleep, your light intake could be a big factor. Red light therapy delivers natural light like you’d get from the sun, but without UV rays, excess heat, or the need for sunny weather.

Red light therapy treatments supercharge your cells with the natural light they need to make more core ATP (adenosine triphosphate) energy. This helps your body run more efficiently, heal faster, and has shown great results for producing more natural melatonin and improving sleep disorders like insomnia.

Red light therapy treatments have shown great sleep results in a range of peer-reviewed clinical studies. One study on the sleep of pro basketball players showed that a 2-week course of red light therapy in the evening improved players’ sleep quality in the short term. Based on the results, the researchers suggested red light therapy would be a good non-invasive, drug-free solution to sleep struggles.

Overcoming Sleep Disorders with Red Light Therapy

Kaiyan's light therapy products are registered with the FDA as class II medical devices for the treatment of pain, strain, and inflammation. While the existing clinical research has been very positive for red light therapy and sleep, keep in mind that Kaiyan's devices are not cleared with the FDA for the treatment of various sleep disorders or melatonin.

Recent research on sleep disorders among people with migraine headaches has shown that red light therapy both decreased headache frequency, and was the only treatment that improved patients’ sleep disorders.

A 2014 study on cognitive function and traumatic brain injury (TBI) recorded that participants had significantly decreased episodes of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and improved sleep.

Analyzing patients’ electrical brain activity, a 2013 sleep study concluded that red light therapy was especially effective at helping people with sleep disorders fall asleep.


When I’m indoors training under the buzz of artificial lights, my body doesn’t get the natural light it needs. Add computers, cell phones, televisions, etc. and it’s easy to overload yourself with blue light. I used to have trouble sleeping after long training days, but since adding more natural light to my routine with red light therapy, I’ve been falling asleep as soon as I lie down, and I’ve been staying asleep all night.*

Sanne Wevers

Gold-Medal Winning Dutch Gymnast

Red Light Therapy, Sleep, Depression, and Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)

Research is showing how closely mood and sleep disorders are interconnected. Parts of the brain that regulate sleep have also been found to closely affect mood. A 2013 review concluded that “nearly all people suffering from mood disorders have significant disruptions in circadian rhythms and the sleep/wake cycle.”

This Greatist post on natural light and serotonin gives good background on the connections between natural light intake, mental health, and sleep. It also mentions using Kaiyan's red light therapy devices to get more natural light, even when you can’t get more sunlight.

Trouble sleeping is one of the most common symptoms of seasonal affective disorder, a type of depression most common in the darker winter months. Some physicians treating patients with mental health disorders have said red light therapy both improves mood, and helps people with depression get better sleep.

Sources and References:

Morita T., Tokura H. “ Effects of lights of different color temperature on the nocturnal changes in core temperature and melatonin in humans” Journal of Physiological Anthropology. 1996, September

Lirong Z., Phyllis Z. “Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorders” Neurologic Clinics. 2012, November.

Color Temperature

The State of Sleep Health in America.

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Gooley, J., Chamberlain, K., Smith, K., Khalsa, S., et al. “Exposure to Room Light before Bedtime Suppresses Melatonin Onset and Shortens Melatonin Duration in Humans” J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2011 Mar.

Hamblin M. “Mechanisms and applications of the anti-inflammatory effects of photobiomodulation”. AIMS Biophys. 2017.

Zhao J., Tian Y., Nie J., Xu J., Liu D. “Red light and the sleep quality and endurance performance of Chinese female basketball players” Journal of Athletic Training. 2012, November-December.

Loeb LM, Amorim RP, et al. “Botulinum toxin A (BT-A) versus low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in chronic migraine treatment: a comparison.” Arquivos de neuro-psiquiatria. 2018 Oct;76(10):663-667.

Naeser MA, Zafonte R, et al. “Significant improvements in cognitive performance post-transcranial, red/near-infrared light-emitting diode treatments in chronic, mild traumatic brain injury: open-protocol study.” Journal of Neurotrauma. 2014 Jun 1;31(11):1008-17.

Wu JH, Chang YC. Effect of low-level laser stimulation on EEG power in normal subjects with closed eyes. Evidence Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine. 2013; 2013:476565.

Vadnie C, and McClung C. Circadian Rhythm Disturbances in Mood Disorders: Insights into the Role of the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus. Neural Plasticity. 2017 November.

McClung C. How might circadian rhythms control mood? Let me count the ways. Biological Psychiatry. 2013 April.

Nutt D, Wilson S, et al. Sleep disorders as core symptoms of depression. Dialogues in Clinical Neuroscience. 2008 September.

Avci P, Gupta A, et al. Low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) in skin: stimulating, healing, restoring. Seminars in Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery. Mar 2013.

Top Light Therapy Masks

Due COVID, everyone is obsessed with skin care these days, regular at-home routines have really leveled up, and no skin-care gadget is as intriguing as the LED light-therapy mask.

Celebrities are no longer the only ones who get to wear luminescent masks and haunt the public’s dreams by instagramming their LED selfies. There are now several regular-person versions available online, meaning anyone can harness the power of LED light, the green light for pain relief and slimming, the blue for bacteria-killing and red for collagen- and elastin-stimulating.

In Kaiyan Medical, we can create your FDA cleared light therapy mask based on your needs and market.

Here the top light therapy masks

MZ Skin Light-Therapy Golden Facial Treatment Device


Average price: $625

Buy here

If your skin is temperamental, it’s nice to have a well-rounded, high-performance mask on call. Designed to replicate MZ skin founder Dr. Maryam Zamani’s in-office treatments, it comes with five different light settings (red, blue, green, yellow, and white) so you can focus on anything from inflamed breakouts to the annoying scars and discoloration those pimples sometimes leave in their wake.


DMH Aesthetics Light Shield


Average price: $189

Buy here

Using this mask you can actually see out of it without lines obstructing your view. It’s designed to be very wearable and on-the-go, so you can continue doing whatever you’re doing while treating your skin. The Light Shield allows the wearer to enjoy RED, BLUE, and AMBER LED therapies. Specifically target post-treatment/facial redness with RED light, shown to boost circulation and speed healing

Project E Beauty Wireless LED Light Skin Rejuvenation Therapy Mask


Average price: $200

Buy here

This mask comes with seven different light colors to treat every skin-care issue imaginable on the face. Project E’s mask goes a step further with a bonus attachment for the neck, arguably the most overlooked part of skin-care routines. 99 + 40 LED lights cover your face & neck, upgraded to emit the most optimal wavelengths with 5 levels of intensity.


LG Derma Pra.L Mask


Average price: $480

Buy here

If you’re a K-beauty fan, there’s a Korean LED face mask just for you! This one comes from LG. All that appliance expertise has been channeled into a mask that hits the skin with red and infrared LED light in quick, nine-minute sessions focused on improving skin elasticity and brightness.


Dr. Dennis Gross Skin-Care SpectraLite Faceware Pro


Average price: $435

This LED mask from Dr. Dennis Gross is one of the more fashionable ones on the market. It comes with gold accents, 162 LED lights, and three treatment options to choose from: red-light therapy, blue-light therapy, or red and blue–light therapy.


TOP #1 — ADURO ® 7+1 LED FACE MASK


$399.00

Do you value personal comfort while lurking and skulking? This soft, silicone mask is less hockey goalie and more like an actual face mask that molds to your face shape for a more comfortable treatment. The aduro mask is the most advanced home-use facial mask based on light therapy.

  • 7 LED colors
  • Infra-Red Skin Boosting
  • 11 different treatments
  • 20 minutes
  • Non invasive
  • Clinically proven
  • Slows down the aging process
  • Prevents wrinkles
  • Soothes redness of the skin
  • Clears up skin imperfections
  • Stimulates cell rejuvenation
  • Improves skin tone

More information about Aduro here


Personal LED MASK - Aduro Australia
Personal LED MASK - Aduro Australia
Personal LED MASK - Aduro Australia
Personal LED MASK - Aduro Australia
Personal LED MASK - Aduro Australia

Personal LED MASK - Aduro Australia
Personal LED MASK - Aduro Australia
Personal LED MASK - Aduro Australia


Can LED Light Give me The Perfect Skin?

Following the article from the New York Times.

One day, shining light on your face may be the most important part of your skin care routine. We take a look at the newest devices.

The MMSphere, a ring of LED lights, casts a red glow over my face. It sits adjacent to my laptop so that as I write, research and procrastinate, I can simultaneously calm a fiery constellation of acne on my left cheek.

Red light’s anti-inflammatory and collagen-building effects on the skin are well documented. But this hands-free device, designed by Ellen Marmur, a dermatologist in New York, has settings for blue, green, amber and purple light too.

“It has just enough variety that people stay excited to use it,” Dr. Marmur said.

I, too, begin cocktailing. I bathe my face in blue light to kill acne bacteria while watching reruns, and immediately follow up with a FaceTime call to my mother, my face lit up in a bright green light to fight hyperpigmentation.

Skin care efficacy lives and dies by patient compliance. Most at-home LED skin care devices are small and hand-held, requiring time set aside to treat the entire face. People eventually stop using them.

Even with persistent acne as a motivator, I’ve always had trouble following LED protocols. The MMSphere ($495) is a big deal for me because it harnesses a powerful fix-everything-while-doing-nothing ease that makes it almost addictive. You actually want to use it.

“It makes people feel good, like they’re taking care of themselves,” Dr. Marmur said. “You can treat your skin while doing other things, so it’s easier to form the habit of doing it every day.”

Because, really, if we’re just sitting around — talking, eating, working — shouldn’t we be fixing our skin, too?

So How Does LED Work?

First, LED therapy is not the same as a laser treatment, which creates controlled damage to the skin to promote healing. The easiest way to understand the light-as-skin-care concept is to think of skin-friendly visible light as ultraviolet light’s benevolent counterpart.

In a process called photobiomodulation, light alters biological material; for example, UV rays from the sun change our skin in ways that can catalyze cancer and aging.

But some wavelengths of visible light alter our skin for the better, and light-emitting diodes (LED) are a source that delivers that energy.

Jared Jagdeo is an associate professor of dermatology and director of the Center for Phototherapy, SUNY Downstate Health Science University, where he studies LED therapy.

“You can alter the skin through photo-damaging with lasers, or photobiomodulation, which is a much more gentle way of changing the way the skin functions,” Dr. Jagdeo said. Red and blue light are the heavy hitters. He explained why red light in particular works so well.

“There’s a specific receptor in the mitochondria of the skin cells that red light specifically acts upon,” he said. “And that’s why red light is an ideal wavelength for changing the way the skin functions.”

Red light penetrates the skin deeper than other visible light and stimulates the mitochondria, which has an anti-inflammatory and rejuvenating effect. Collagen is built in the dermis, the skin is calmed, and wrinkles eventually fade.

Blue light doesn’t penetrate the skin as deeply but zaps acne-causing bacteria on the surface. The science on green light isn’t as solid, but in theory, it targets melanocytes, discouraging excess melanin production.

Rigorous independent studies have yet to be conducted, but Dr. Marmur did a very small clinical trial on green light for the MMSphere in which subjects self-reported a 32 percent decrease in “brown spots” after a week of green light treatment.

Is All of This Light Ok for my Eyes?

Eye safety is a valid concern, particularly because earlier this year Neutrogena recalled its LED mask over fears that it could cause eye injuries.

Brian S. Biesman, an assistant clinical professor of ophthalmology, dermatology and ENT at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, said that most home devices aren’t powerful enough damage the eyes. The MMSphere comes with opaque goggles, but, Dr. Biesman said, the device is low energy, so it should be safe to use without them.

“Just normal blinking and eye movements should be sufficient to protect the eyes,” he said. “But never stare at a bright light source.”

More Thoughts

“As far as the F.D.A. is concerned, if I use CO2 laser resurfacing, it better work because of the amount of risk involved,” said Suzanne Kilmer, a clinical professor of dermatology at the UC Davis School of Medicine in Sacramento and director of the Laser and Skin Surgery Medical Group.

“Compare that to a home device,” Dr. Kilmer said. If it doesn’t kill you, blind you or make things much worse, it’s probably going to get approved. So it’s actually more incumbent upon the people selling home devices to show efficacy. You have to trust the people who are selling them.”

“LED is real, but it’s probably not optimized yet,” Dr. Kilmer said.

Many factors determine the amount of light your skin needs and receives: the strength of the light, the distance from source to skin, how long the light is used, and your skin color.

“Some of these lights on the market are very weak, and they may not have enough energy output to actually have a biological effect,” Dr. Jagdeo said. “Imagine a glow stick. It produces a color. But you could shine it on your face all day, and it’s not going to change the way your skin works.”

Furthermore, the medical community has yet to establish standard doses for treating conditions like hyperpigmentation and acne at home. Dr. Marmur based her MMSphere dosing on Blu-U, an in-office blue light that is commonly used as an alternative therapy for precancerous lesions.

“Consistent Sphere treatment for seven weeks will equal the energy given in the office with the Blu-U,” she said.

Another device, the Dr. Dennis Gross DRx SpectraLite FaceWare Pro, $435, emits red and blue light in a mask format, and each session is only three minutes. The mask’s LEDs are in contact with the skin, which may be a more effective treatment. Dr. Jagdeo said that you lose some energy on the way from device to skin, a potential downside of the MMSphere design.

“This is a tremendously undertapped area in medicine,” he said. “But LED light therapy is going to revolutionize the way home medical treatment is delivered for skin care over the next 10 to 15 years.”

Kaiyan Medical

In Kaiyan Medical you can create your own LED facial mask. We have developed Aduro mask who is one of the top facial masks in the beauty industry. Julia Roberts is a big fan of Aduro Mask. For more information visit https://www.aduroled.com/

Defeat the Migraine with the Power of the Green Light

What is a Migraine?

Migraine is a neurological condition that can cause multiple symptoms. It’s frequently characterized by intense, debilitating headaches. Symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, difficulty speaking, numbness or tingling, and sensitivity to light and sound. Migraines often run in families and affect all ages.

People describe migraine pain as:

  • Pulsating
  • Throbbing
  • Perforating
  • Pounding
  • Debilitating
Migraine Symptoms

Migraine symptoms may begin one to two days before the headache itself. This is known as the prodrome stage. Symptoms during this stage can include:

  • Food cravings
  • Depression
  • Fatigue or low energy
  • Frequent yawning
  • Hyperactivity
  • Irritability
  • Neck stiffness
LED Green Light: a Novel, Non-Invasive, and Non-Pharmacological Therapy.

The effects of green light on the brain have been researched and well-documented for years. The green light can reset the circadian rhythm through melatonin, the hormone that regulates our sleep-wake cycles. A special photoreceptor system in the human eye picks up light and elicits non-visual responses, sending signals to the brain to reset the body’s internal clock and altering melatonin production levels.

Long-time sufferers of migraines and other chronic pain conditions may benefit from exposure to LED green light. A new study, led by pharmacologist Mohab M. Ibrahim, M.D., Ph.D., found that the color green may be key to easing pain.

Ibrahim’s interest in studying the ameliorating effects of green light was inspired by his brother, who has dealt with severe headaches for several years. Instead of taking ibuprofen, his brother would sit in his garden and soak up the verdure of nature to ease the pain from his headaches.

“I wanted to see what is in his garden or in a garden, in general, that would make headaches better,” said Ibrahim, director of the Chronic Pain Management Clinic at Banner — University Medical Center Tucson.

In his clinical practice, Ibrahim also saw that his patients suffering from migraines and fibromyalgia had limited treatment options, and wanted to find a novel, non-invasive, nonpharmacological therapy.

In his study, which has yet to be published, Ibrahim exposed 25 migraine volunteers first to white lights for two hours as a control, then to green LED lights. He measured multiple parameters, including pain reduction, frequency of migraines or headaches, frequency of fibromyalgia flare-ups, pain intensity and duration, and quality of life.

On a scale of 0 to 10, with 0 indicating no pain and 10 the highest level of pain, migraine volunteers had an initial average baseline pain score of 8. After completing the green light therapy, their score dropped down to an average of 2.8. The frequency of headaches dropped from 19 to 6.5 per month, and the overall quality of life climbed from 48 percent to 78 percent.

“The best part about it … is the simplicity, the affordability and, most importantly, the lack of side effects,” Ibrahim said. “It’s a normal light. We’re not using a high-energy laser or anything like that.”

But if pain works through the nervous system, how exactly can green light, which works through the visual system, make people feel better?

New studies show that there are neuronal connections that span from the retina all the way to the spinal cord, passing through the parts of the brain that control and modulate pain. Green light changes the levels of serotonin and alters the endogenous opioid system, an innate pain-relieving system found throughout the central and peripheral nervous system, gastrointestinal tract, and immune system, said Bing Liao, M.D., a neurologist at Houston Methodist Hospital.

“The endogenous opioid system … allows the body to generate something similar to opioids and gives us a sensation of pain relief and happy feeling,” Liao said. “Research has found that, with green light, the receptors of the endogenous opioid system can increase production in the brain and body, and the hormone by itself can increase in production, as well. … It might be an explanation for why people feel good when they’re in a green environment.”

While more studies must be done to test the efficacy of green light therapy as a treatment for chronic pain, Ibrahim said he is trying to advance this therapy as a complement to current therapies.

“What this green light therapy offers is a non-invasive, non-pharmacological additional tool, so it might help reduce opioids,” he said. “I don’t think it will eliminate opioids, but at least it may reduce it enough. It may provide people just with extra help or extra relief so that they may not need the number of opioids that they’re on.”

References

https://www.tmc.edu/news/2020/02/exposure-to-green-light-may-reduce-pain/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28001756

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21182447

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23964217

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7769534

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26989758

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15557336

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21172691

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2214647416300381?via%3Dihub

Which is the Vitamin that is not Normally Found in any Vegetarian Food? — Vitamin D

What would happen if you don’t get enough sun?

Which is the vitamin that is not normally found in any vegetarian food? Vitamin D.

Scientists have defined vitamins as organic (carbon-containing) chemicals that must be obtained from dietary sources because they are not produced by our bodies. Vitamins play a crucial role in our body’s metabolism, but only tiny amounts are needed to fill that role.

The discovery of Vitamin D was the culmination of a long search for a way to cure rickets in the 1920s, a painful childhood bone disease. Within a decade, the fortification of foods with vitamin D was on the way, and rickets became rare in the United States. However, research results suggest that vitamin D may have a role in other aspects of human health.

Vitamin Dit’s absent from all-natural foods except for fish and egg yolks, and even when it’s obtained from foods, it must be transformed by the body before it can do any good. That’s why the energy of the Sun is so important.

The sun’s energy turns a chemical in your skin into vitamin D3, which is carried to your liver and then your kidneys to transform it into active vitamin D.

The main cause of vitamin D deficiency is a lack of direct sunlight.
The main cause of vitamin D deficiency is a lack of direct sunlight

Humans, day by day, spend less time outdoors. Most people work indoors now, and many of our leisure pursuits occur in an indoor setting as well. What’s more, when we are outside, many people avoid the sun as much as possible. The result is the body not absorbing enough UVB rays to create the amount of vitamin D it requires. Often, symptoms of vitamin D deficiency are quite mild. When noticed, they mainly consist of:

  • Bone pain.
  • Chronic fatigue.
  • Frequent bone fractures.
  • Muddled thought processes.
  • Muscle weakness.
  • Soft or deformed bones.

Though you may not notice any symptoms, that doesn’t mean that vitamin D deficiency doesn’t present serious health risks. These include:

  • Children may develop severe asthma.
  • Immune system problems, raising your risk of infection.
  • Insulin resistance, impacting your body’s ability to process sugar and increasing your risk of diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and glucose intolerance.
  • Osteoporosis, a condition that includes brittle bones that are more likely to fracture.
  • Reduced cognitive function.
  • Rickets, a bone disease that causes soft bones and skeletal deformities.
Other conditions that would happen without enough sunlight

Less chance of having a baby

Without sunlight, there will be more melatonin in a woman’s body. This is a hormone that suppresses fertility, thereby reducing her chances of conceiving a baby. Moreover, women who get less sunlight reach their menopause earlier than those who are exposed to the Sun. Men can also suffer from a lack of sunlight; it directly influences testosterone levels.

Less chance of having a baby

Raw nerves

It’s believed that if children don’t get enough sunlight, they’ll be more at risk of developing multiple sclerosis, a disease of the central nervous system when they become adults.

All those aches and pains

Without sunlight, be prepared to get more pains all over your body. Sunlight helps to warm the body’s muscles and reduce the pain caused by inflammatory conditions such as arthritis.

No sunny emotions

Image for post

Without sunlight, we would be forever stuck with the seasonal affective disorder (SAD), commonly known as the winter blues. It’s a form of depression that is specifically caused by a lack of sunlight. Artificial light cannot fully replace natural sunlight.

Recent evidence suggests that vitamin D may help prevent many disorders, such as diabetes, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, bronchitis, premenstrual syndrome, increased blood pressure, strokes and heart attacks, and even cancer. Low serum vitamin D levels are also associated with being overweight, abdominal obesity, metabolic syndrome, stroke, and diabetes. In addition, having lower blood vitamin D levels for a long period is associated with increased heart attacks and all-cause mortality.

In Kaiyan medical, we believe in the benefits of light. We believe in healing without chemicals. With our lights, we want you to have the best version of yourself. More at kaiyanmedical.com

References:

Holick MF (March 2006). “High prevalence of vitamin D inadequacy and implications for health”. Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 81 (3): 353–73. doi:10.4065/81.3.353. PMID 16529140.

Holick MF (December 2004). “Sunlight and vitamin D for bone health and prevention of autoimmune diseases, cancers, and cardiovascular disease”. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 80 (6 Suppl): 1678S–88S. doi:10.1093/ajcn/80.6.1678S. PMID 15585788.

Weick MT (November 1967). “A history of rickets in the United States”. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 20 (11): 1234–41. doi:10.1093/ajcn/20.11.1234. PMID 4862158.

Aghajafari F, Nagulesapillai T, Ronksley PE, Tough SC, O’Beirne M, Rabi DM (March 2013). “Association between maternal serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level and pregnancy and neonatal outcomes: systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies”. BMJ. 346: f1169. doi:10.1136/bmj.f1169. PMID 23533188.

Palacios C, De-Regil LM, Lombardo LK, Peña-Rosas JP (November 2016). “Vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy: Updated meta-analysis on maternal outcomes”. The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. 164: 148–155. doi:10.1016/j.jsbmb.2016.02.008. PMC 5357731. PMID 26877200.

Roth DE, Leung M, Mesfin E, Qamar H, Watterworth J, Papp E (November 2017). “Vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy: state of the evidence from a systematic review of randomised trials”. BMJ. 359: j5237. doi:10.1136/bmj.j5237. PMC 5706533. PMID 29187358.

The Beauty and the Beam: the Magic of the Red Light Therapy.

Skeptical

While I was initially skeptical at the 8-minute treatment, after I started to calm my mind, I fell in love with it. From age spots, to dry skin and acne, it cures whatever ails you. Could sound like a magic potion from a princess but is just light therapy. Before you go with the “What the…?” face, it’s only a matter of time before it shows up in most of the celebrities’ social media.

Most of our users describe it as

“warm and relaxing, and allows you to go into a meditative state of mind.”

LED light therapy has an established history of skin uses. The U.S. Navy SEALs began using it in the 1990s to help heal wounds quickly and to help regenerate damaged muscle tissues.

Since then, the treatment has been researched for different situations in aesthetics. It’s mainly noted for increasing collagen and tissues.

There are different frequencies, or wavelengths, used with LED light treatment. These include red and blue light frequencies, which don’t contain ultraviolet rays and are readily absorbed into the skin.

Light therapy

Different than Daylight

Unlike ultraviolet rays from the sun which damage the DNA of skin cells, “light emitted in this spectrum is perfectly safe,” said Dr. Susan Bard, a board-certified dermatologist based in New York City.

That means there’s no tanning or burning when you’re exposed to red light. Its effects happen deep inside at the cellular level. All living things need to make ATP cellular energy to function and survive, and nearly all living things rely on natural light to power this process in our cells every day. Red and near-infrared wavelengths of natural light stimulate the mitochondria in your cells, the powerhouses responsible for taking light, oxygen, and the food we eat — and turning it into usable energy for our bodies through the process of cellular respiration.

Light therapy

Uses of Red Light

Red light therapy has been used to treat or improve the following:

  • pain
  • inflammation
  • healing
  • tissue regeneration
  • autoimmune diseases
  • brain disorders
  • athletic performance
  • eyesight
  • heating
  • cancer therapy side effects

“The number of conditions red light can treat is ‘continuously expanding”

said Michael R. Hamblin, PhD, a principal investigator at the Wellman Center for Photomedicine at Massachusetts General Hospital and associate professor of dermatology at Harvard Medical School.

The Short Version

Light therapy delivers safe, concentrated wavelengths of natural light to your skin and cells, with no chemicals, UV rays, or excess heat. These red and near-infrared wavelengths of light stimulate the mitochondria in your cells similar to natural sunlight, reducing oxidative stress, and increasing circulation, so your body is able to make more core energy to power itself.

In Kaiyan medical, we believe in the benefits of light. We believe in healing without chemicals. With our lights, we want you to have the best version of yourself.