Deuterium and Red Light Therapy

As the most accessible element in the globe, hydrogen plays a huge role in our biological processes. However, you may not know that hydrogen usually brings an uninvited guest in your body, and we call it deuterium. Having high deuterium levels may change the chemical reactions in your cells and affect your bodily functions and metabolism, leading to unwanted health consequences.

What is Deuterium?

Deuterium is also known as a “heavy hydrogen” and is one of the two stable hydrogen isotopes. We commonly have it in our bodies — in fact, it helps children grow. However, adults may have too much deuterium because of dietary and environmental factors. As mentioned above, this may lead to chemical reactions at a cellular level and lead to health risks.

How Can Deuterium Affect Your Health Negatively?

Hydrogen is necessary for our day-to-day bodily functions. Our biological processes require it, and we usually get it from what we eat or drink. Upon intake, hydrogen goes to the mitochondria, also known as the powerhouse of the cells.

Our mitochondria can be compared to thousands of engines that continually run to produce the ATP energy we need to survive daily. The majority of people eat only three to five pounds of food each day, but we usually make more than 170 pounds of ATP energy at the same time.

On the other hand, deuterium is like hydrogen’s “evil” sibling. And we repeat, excess deuterium is harmful to our bodies. Because it is twice as heavy and large as hydrogen, it may damage the nanomotors in your mitochondria and slow down ATP energy production. As time goes by, the wear and tear on your nanomotors caused by the heavy hydrogen atoms may completely break your nanomotors. This damage may cause muscle pain, dehydration, impaired memory, poor sleep, headaches, and lymph nodes.

How Can You Measure the Level of Deuterium in Your Body?

Two “D-terminator” diagnostic tests can help measure the deuterium levels in your body. Advanced technology, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), can also be used to visualize and track deuterium patterns in your body, whether it’s in your bodily fluids, DNA, or even your hair and nails. Based on these tests, your doctor will be able to determine your deuterium levels. And when it shows to be excessive, he/she may come up with a plan to deplete deuterium in your body.

Why Do We Get Overloaded with Deuterium?

We experience high deuterium levels because of what we eat or drink and some other environmental factors. For instance, carbohydrates, processed foods, and synthetic supplements contain high levels of deuterium. Tap, ocean, and river water also have high deuterium levels, so when you’re exposed to these things regularly, you may experience an overload of this hydrogen isotope.

How Can You Deplete Deuterium?

Nutrition is the baseline of depleting deuterium. Based on your test results, your doctor may recommend consuming food groups that contain lower levels of deuterium, such as proteins, green vegetables, and healthy fats. You may also be advised to drink deuterium-depleted water to lower your deuterium levels.

Health experts say that a body that functions properly can naturally regulate deuterium levels and produce healthy amounts of ATP energy.

How Does Red Light Affect Deuterium?

Red and near-infrared light can affect our body’s hydrogen bonds in a process quite similar to photosynthesis. The water inside our cells usually becomes less harmful when our bodies absorb wavelengths of red and near-infrared light between 600–950 nanometers. This helps with proper cellular respiration and helps increase ATP energy production in your body.

Changing the water's resistance in your body, red, and near-infrared light can help reduce the amount of friction at the cellular level, promote cellular longevity, and lead to higher outputs of good energy.

To learn more about the benefits of red light therapy or to see what kind of red and near light therapy devices you can use to lower your deuterium levels, click here.


More References

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-61983-3

https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-61983-3

Wang, M.; Audi, G.; Kondev, F. G.; Huang, W. J.; Naimi, S.; Xu, X. (2017). "The AME2016 atomic mass evaluation (II). Tables, graphs, and references" (PDF). Chinese Physics C. 41 (3): 030003-1–030003-442. doi:10.1088/1674-1137/41/3/030003.

https://www.hindawi.com/journals/tswj/2018/5454367/

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