Design Thinking in the Health and Wellness Industry

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The health and wellness industry isn’t lacking eager customers who want to improve their overall well-being—we have the numbers to prove it. In 2020, the global health and wellness market reached a value of $ 3.31 Billion and is expected to reach $ 4.24 Billion by 2026. It’s clear people are seeking ways to reduce lifestyle-related diseases and slow down the aging process. 

While many companies stay in their comfort zone, they ignore the needs and challenges their customers face. However, by trying to understand user experience, companies can improve the overall customer experience and reduce costs. One of the most promising ways to understand a customer’s experience is by design thinking. 

While many companies stay in their comfort zone, they’re ignoring the needs and challenges their customers face. However, by trying to understand user experience, companies can not only improve the overall customer experience, but reduce costs. One of the most promising ways to understand a customer’s experience is by design thinking. 

As said in Harvard Business Review, design thinking is “a set of principles...empathy with users, a discipline of prototyping, and tolerance for failure chief among them—is the best tool we have for creating those kinds of interactions and developing a responsive, flexible organizational culture.” But what does that actually mean?

Unlike traditional methods of problem-solving, design thinking focuses heavily on understanding customers before focusing on solutions. By knowing the customer's challenges and experiences, a more personalized and well-thought solution can be made. 

For example, Kaiyan's Aduro 7+1 face mask for light therapy was created via design thinking. Instead of simply creating a mask for professional use, we went through various prototypes and tests to understand the customer's needs and the challenges they may face. Users commented on needing an adjustable fit, so we added an adjustable velcro head strap for improved comfort. 

But there’s more to it than that. With design thinking, there are a specific set of principles we follow when creating a product.

Design thinking focuses on user experience

To develop empathy with users, the design team needs to understand the needs and desires of users. If not, there’s a likely chance they’ll create a product that no one wants. Using emotional language to describe products and users will help cement the utility of the product itself. It’s about creating a feeling from the product. For example, using a certain type of light therapy device for anti-aging can make a person feel energetic and youthful.

Examine complex problems through models

Creating models gives space to explore and understand the product on a tangible level. Physical models, also known as design artifacts, help define the customer journey map and their interactions with the product.

Explore solutions through prototypes

Before launching a product, a prototype is created to explore possible problems and resolve them. Creating prototypes allows you to test the product out beforehand, understanding how it's used in the real world. 

Failing forward

While design thinking doesn't encourage failure, it's normal for a product to need multiple adjustments before it's ready for launch. With each learning curve, the product becomes more improved and customized to the target market. 

And this is what we do at Kaiyan Medical. Our light therapy devices are developed through design thinking and expert engineering; we focus on understanding the customer's needs and desires, and ensure they're met. 

If you’re considering developing a private label light therapy device, our medical-grade, high-quality devices are the best for your business. We are eager to work with like-minded partners using design thinking to develop effective, safe, and valuable products that harness that power of light.


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