Stop Putting Ice in your Injuries

Icing an injury is one of the most common treatment modalities. But is icing actually beneficial?

For decades, coaches and doctors have recommended applying ice to minor injuries like sprains and strains. The method itself is straightforward, apply ice, put pressure on it, and rest. This approach to recovery has been massively popular because it doesn’t require any special equipment or expertise.

The idea got popular in 1978 with the book Sportsmedicine Book written by Dr. Gabe Mirkin. Since the book’s publication, Dr. Mirkin has actually changed his stance on ice as a helpful recovery modality. By staying up to date with new recovery research, Dr. Mirkin’s views on ice adapted and evolved. He now believes that applying ice to injured tissue causes the blood vessel to constrict and stop the blood flow necessary for healing and processing inflammation.

Ice Isn’t Good for Recovery.

Since the late ’70s, many more studies have been conducted that specifically examine cold therapy’s effect on soft tissue injury. One 2008 meta-analysis that examined multiple studies found that there isn’t enough evidence to suggest icing improves the healing of soft tissue injuries.

Studies have concluded that applying ice is based largely on anecdotal evidence or someone saying the modality works without any hard data. Anecdotal evidence is hard to counteract. People tend to believe in what they think works and have seen work, even if research evidence disproves their reasoning. Icing injuries is just one example.

Ice Harmful for Recovery?

Ice may be the safest, simplest pain relief tool we have at our disposal. When used to numb an injury, ice is beneficial. But when used for more than 5 minutes, according to Dr. Mirkin, ice can be detrimental to the body’s natural tissue repair process. Extended use of ice can also lead to reduced strength, flexibility, and endurance.

Ice is not an ideal recovery method because it has the effect of slowing your body’s natural response, which is essential to healing. It’s better to use a modality that enhances your body’s natural recovery response, like light therapy.

Light Therapy Heals Better than Ice

Healthy light intake is a key part of a healthy, balanced lifestyle. Like exercise, nutritious eating, and restful sleep, healthy light intake can greatly impact managing recovery. You can enhance cellular function and help support your body’s natural recovery process with light therapy treatments.

Inflammation & Red Light Therapy

Inflammation is a natural response to injury and an integral part of the healing process. In a healthy response to stress or injury, inflammation sets in within a few hours and works to clear the damaged tissue and start the repair process. Once the injury or strain is healed, the inflammation gradually fades away.

Ice and red light therapy have very different effects on inflammation. Ice works to suppress the body’s inflammatory response, while red light therapy supports inflammation management. Ice prevents normal inflammation from doing its job, which is to help us heal and process strain. Red light therapy can speed up the recovery process by helping the body process inflammation and oxidative stress more efficiently. Dr. Michael Hamblin of Harvard Medical School is one of the world’s leading photomedicine researchers, and he believes light therapy produces an “overall reduction in inflammation.”

Sleep is Still Key for Recovery

Dr. Mirkin may have changed his stance on ice usage for recovery, but basic rest remains a core recovery component. There’s no substitute for sleep when it comes to your body’s ability to heal itself. Red light therapy treatments are designed to enhance cellular function. They support a balanced lifestyle with healthy light in the comfort of your own home, which can positively impact the quality of your sleep.


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Stop Putting Ice in your Injuries

Stop Putting Ice in your Injuries

Icing an injury is one of the most common treatment modalities. But is icing actually beneficial?

For decades, coaches and doctors have recommended applying ice to minor injuries like sprains and strains. The method itself is straightforward, apply ice, put pressure on it, and rest. This approach to recovery has been massively popular because it doesn’t require any special equipment or expertise.

The idea got popular in 1978 with the book Sportsmedicine Book written by Dr. Gabe Mirkin. Since the book’s publication, Dr. Mirkin has actually changed his stance on ice as a helpful recovery modality. By staying up to date with new recovery research, Dr. Mirkin’s views on ice adapted and evolved. He now believes that applying ice to injured tissue causes the blood vessel to constrict and stop the blood flow necessary for healing and processing inflammation.

Ice Isn’t Good for Recovery.

Since the late ’70s, many more studies have been conducted that specifically examine cold therapy’s effect on soft tissue injury. One 2008 meta-analysis that examined multiple studies found that there isn’t enough evidence to suggest icing improves the healing of soft tissue injuries.

Studies have concluded that applying ice is based largely on anecdotal evidence or someone saying the modality works without any hard data. Anecdotal evidence is hard to counteract. People tend to believe in what they think works and have seen work, even if research evidence disproves their reasoning. Icing injuries is just one example.

Ice Harmful for Recovery?

Ice may be the safest, simplest pain relief tool we have at our disposal. When used to numb an injury, ice is beneficial. But when used for more than 5 minutes, according to Dr. Mirkin, ice can be detrimental to the body’s natural tissue repair process. Extended use of ice can also lead to reduced strength, flexibility, and endurance.

Ice is not an ideal recovery method because it has the effect of slowing your body’s natural response, which is essential to healing. It’s better to use a modality that enhances your body’s natural recovery response, like light therapy.

Light Therapy Heals Better than Ice

Healthy light intake is a key part of a healthy, balanced lifestyle. Like exercise, nutritious eating, and restful sleep, healthy light intake can greatly impact managing recovery. You can enhance cellular function and help support your body’s natural recovery process with light therapy treatments.

Inflammation & Red Light Therapy

Inflammation is a natural response to injury and an integral part of the healing process. In a healthy response to stress or injury, inflammation sets in within a few hours and works to clear the damaged tissue and start the repair process. Once the injury or strain is healed, the inflammation gradually fades away.

Ice and red light therapy have very different effects on inflammation. Ice works to suppress the body’s inflammatory response, while red light therapy supports inflammation management. Ice prevents normal inflammation from doing its job, which is to help us heal and process strain. Red light therapy can speed up the recovery process by helping the body process inflammation and oxidative stress more efficiently. Dr. Michael Hamblin of Harvard Medical School is one of the world’s leading photomedicine researchers, and he believes light therapy produces an “overall reduction in inflammation.”

Sleep is Still Key for Recovery

Dr. Mirkin may have changed his stance on ice usage for recovery, but basic rest remains a core recovery component. There’s no substitute for sleep when it comes to your body’s ability to heal itself. Red light therapy treatments are designed to enhance cellular function. They support a balanced lifestyle with healthy light in the comfort of your own home, which can positively impact the quality of your sleep.


Light Therapy & Sleep Quality:  The Secret of the Chinese Female Basketball Players

Light Therapy & Sleep Quality: The Secret of the Chinese Female Basketball Players

Good sleep is a prerequisite for optimal performance. Given that people spend about one-third of their lives asleep, sleep has substantial development, daily functioning, and health. Perhaps no daytime behavior has been associated more closely with improved sleep than exercise. Researchers have shown that exercise serves as a positive function for sleep. Regular exercise consistently has been associated with better sleep. Moreover, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine considers physical exercise a modality of nonpharmacologic treatment for sleep disorders. When studying the influence of exercise on sleep, most investigators have compared acute and sedentary control treatments. In the study of regular moderate-intensity endurance exercise, researchers also provided compelling evidence that exercise promotes sleep.

However, exercise can negatively affect sleep quality. Exercising immediately before going to sleep is detrimental to sleep quality. Athletes train very hard to improve their on-field performances, but excessive training may decrease performance, known as overtraining syndrome. Researchers have shown that symptoms of overtraining indicate poor-quality sleep. Good sleep is an important recovery method for the prevention and treatment of overtraining in sports practice.

In a recent study in which red-light therapy (wavelength = 670 nm, light dose = 4 J/cm2) was used, researchers indicated that red light could restore glutathione redox balance upon toxicologic insult enhance both cytochrome c oxidase and energy production, all of which may be affected by melatonin. Melatonin is a neurohormone that is produced by the pineal gland and regulates sleep and circadian functions. No one knows whether sleep is regulated by melatonin after red-light irradiation in athletes. Researchers have demonstrated that phototherapy improves muscle regeneration after exercise. A red light could protect human erythrocytes in preserved diluted whole blood from the damage caused by experimental artificial heart-lung machines.

Participants

Twenty female athletes of the Chinese People’s Liberation Army team (age = 18.60 ± 3.60 years) participated in the study. All participants were healthy and were not using medications regularly or temporarily during the measurements. Athletes were excluded if they had participated in less than 80% of the scheduled team physical training and basketball sessions for the last 3 months or used any nutritional supplements or pharmacologic agents. All participants provided written informed consent, and the Ethical Committee approved the China Institute of Sport Science study.

Design

Participants were assigned randomly to either a red-light therapy intervention group (n = 10) or non–red-light therapy intervention group (placebo group, n = 10). Measurements were collected at preintervention (baseline) and postintervention (14 days). The exercise training schedule of the 2 groups was unchanged during the 14 days; the red-light treatment group used a red-light therapy instrument every night for total body irradiation for 30 minutes. The training routine of the athletes during the 14 intervention days included 12 exercise sessions with the following specifications: 2 hours of morning training, 2 hours of afternoon training, and no training on Sunday.

The red-light treatment participants lay in the supine position. Continuous illumination was performed using noncoherent red light from a whole-body red-light treatment machine-like Kaiyan’s red light therapy bed, with an average wavelength of 658 nm and a light dose of 30 J/cm2. The whole body received the phototherapy treatment. The placebo participants also lay in the supine position under the red-light device but did not receive any light illumination. All participants wore swimsuits to enhance irradiation from the device and were blind to the treatment.


Measurement

Sleep Quality

The Chinese version of the PSQI measured sleep quality. The 19-item measure assesses sleep quality and disturbances over a half-month time interval. The total PSQI score ranges from 0 to 21, and higher scores reflect poorer-quality sleep. The 7 items of this instrument measure several aspects of insomnia: difficulties with onset and maintenance of sleep, satisfaction with the current sleep pattern, interference with daily functioning, noticeable impairment attributed to sleep problems, degree of distress, and concern caused by any sleeping problems.

Cooper 12-Minute Run

Participants were instructed to complete as many laps as possible on a 400-m outdoor track during the 12-minute test period. Emphasis was placed on pacing oneself throughout the test. The test administrators counted the laps completed during the 12-minute test period while calling out the time elapsed at 3, 6, and 9 minutes and orally encouraging the participants. At the end of the 12-minute period, the test administrator instructed the participants to stop and used a measuring wheel to determine the fraction of the last lap completed by each participant. This distance was added to the distance determined by the number of laps completed to give the total distance covered during the test.

Serum Melatonin

In humans, the serum level of melatonin, derived mainly from the pineal gland, demonstrates a clear increase at night and a decrease during the day. Given that the masking effects of activities (e.g., exercise, sleep, and food intake) have little effect on the circulating melatonin level's daily pattern, melatonin secretion appears to directly reflect the function of the biological clock as a specific marker of the circadian rhythm.

Conclusions

The study has demonstrated that red-light illumination positively affected sleep quality and endurance performance variables in Chinese female basketball players. Based on previous studies, we can infer that red-light treatment contributes to increased melatonin secretion in the pineal gland and muscle regeneration. Although more studies involving phototherapy, sleep, and exercise performance need to be performed, red-light treatment is a possible nonpharmacologic and noninvasive therapy to prevent sleep disorders after training.

Acknowledgments

This research project was supported by the National Key Technologies R&D Program Fund of China (2006BAK37B06).

Originally from:


Red Light and the Sleep Quality and Endurance Performance of Chinese Female Basketball Players

Jiexiu Zhao, Ye Tian, Jinlei Nie, Jincheng Xu, Dongsen Liu

J Athl Train. 2012 Nov-Dec; 47(6): 673–678. doi: 10.4085/1062-6050-47.6.08

PMCID: PMC3499892

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Light Therapy & Kids with Autism

Light Therapy & Kids with Autism

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complicated syndrome of nervous system development characterized clinically by language impairment, dysfunction in social engagement, language, stereotypical movements and behaviors, and various cognitive deficits.

Light can have a deep influence on people. Different colored lighting can affect our moods, and a lack of natural light can cause depression. This especially applies to those with autism.

Children with autism are especially susceptible to mood changes due to lighting. Lights with mellow colors, like blue, can help a child relax and become creative. Flickering, humming, or harshly colored lights, on the other hand, can confuse and even hurt them. For this reason, it is important that lighting is controllable and monitored in the child’s rooms.

In addition to manufactured lighting, natural lighting also has its effects. Natural lighting has proven benefits for autistic children. Seasonal affective disorder, or SAD, caused by a lack of natural light during winter months, can foster behavioral issues and depression. Natural light has been shown to relieve these symptoms.

Light therapy has been used for more than to relieve these symptoms. Natural light can help regulate a child’s circadian rhythms. These rhythms govern our body’s “internal master clock.” For example, they tell us when it’s time to sleep. A lack of natural light can cause our rhythms to fall out of sync. Therefore, treatment can make a child with insomnia fall asleep without aids and become more alert during the day, among other benefits.

The best time for treatment is in the morning, soon after the child rises. Even spending just 30 minutes in the light can improve their mood and sleeping habits. 30 minutes might not be possible initially, so while building up to it, another session in the afternoon can help. But therapy at night can have negative effects, worsening a child’s routine and making it harder to fall asleep.

Clinical Study

A study examined the efficacy of low-level laser therapy, a form of photobiomodulation, to treat irritability associated with an autistic spectrum disorder in children and adolescents aged 5–17 years. Twenty-one of the 40 participants received eight 5-min procedures administered to the base of the skull and temporal areas across a 4-week period (test, i.e., active treatment participants). All the participants were evaluated with the Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC), with the global scale and five subscales (irritability/agitation, lethargy/social withdrawal, stereotypic behavior, hyperactivity/noncompliance, and inappropriate speech), and the Clinical Global Impressions (CGI) Scale including a severity-of-illness scale (CGI-S) and a global improvement/change scale (CGI-C). The evaluation took place at baseline, week 2 (interim), week 4 (endpoint), and week 8 (post-procedure) of the study. The adjusted mean difference in the baseline to study endpoint change in the ABC irritability subscale score between test and placebo participants was -15.17 in favor of the test procedure group. ANCOVA analysis found this difference statistically significant (F = 99.34, p < 0.0001) compared to the baseline ABC irritability subscale score. The study found that low-level laser therapy could be an effective tool for reducing irritability and other symptoms and behaviors associated with the autistic spectrum disorder in children and adolescents, with positive changes maintained and augmented over time.

A significant literature exists on Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) ability, a form of photobiomodulation, to penetrate the skull in both diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Low energy laser passes the skull, and a therapeutic effect likely exists. Low energy laser systems employ the so-called quantum optical induced transparency (QIT)-effect. This effect, electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), controls optical properties of dense media and can enhance transparency contrast by a factor of five. Therefore, the skull, spine, or joints can be penetrated even with moderate intensity light. Due to the QIT effect, the radiation should reach deep tissue layers in muscles, connective tissue, and even bone, enabling noninvasive transcranial treatments.

Conclusions

The study’s findings strongly illustrate that not only does the application of light therapy affect a sizable, statistically significant, and clinically meaningful improvement in all of the key evaluable behaviors characteristic of autism disorder in children and adolescents, but it continues to affect a progressive and meaningful improvement in symptoms for up to 6 months following completion of the procedure administration protocol.

LLLT can achieve a therapeutic effect by employing non-ionizing light, including lasers, light-emitting diodes, or broadband light in the visible red (600–700 nm) and near-infrared (780–1100 nm) spectra. LLLT is a non-thermal process beginning when a chromophore molecule is exposed to a suitable wavelength of light. Chromophores are responsible for the color associated with biological compounds such as hemoglobin, myoglobin, and cytochromes. When a chromophore absorbs a photon of light, an electron transits to an excited state. The physiologic effects of LLLT occur when photons dissociate the inhibitory signaling molecule, nitric oxide (NO), from cytochrome-C-oxidase, increasing: electron transport, mitochondrial membrane potentials production of mitochondrial products such as ATP, NADH, RNA, and cellular respiration. The leading hypothesis is that the photons dissociate inhibitory nitric oxide from the enzyme, leading to increased electron transport, mitochondrial membrane potential, and ATP production.

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30. Ranasinghe, K. G., L. B. Hinkley, A. J. Beagle, D. Mizuiri, S. M. Honma, A. E. Welch, I. Hubbard, M. L. Mandelli, Z. A. Miller, C. Garrett, A. La, A. L. Boxer, J. F. Houde, B. L. Miller, K. A. Vossel, M. L. Gorno-Tempini, and S. S. Nagarajan. 2017. 'Distinct spatiotemporal patterns of neuronal functional connectivity in primary progressive aphasia variants', Brain, 140: 2737-51.
31. Rochkind, S., A. Shahar, M. Amon, and Z. Nevo. 2002. 'Transplantation of embryonal spinal cord nerve cells cultured on biodegradable microcarriers followed by low power laser irradiation for the treatment of traumatic paraplegia in rats', Neurol Res, 24: 355-60.
32. Rojahn, J., and W. J. Helsel. 1991. 'The Aberrant Behavior Checklist with children and adolescents with dual diagnosis', J Autism Dev Disord, 21: 17-28.
33. Salehpour, F., J. Mahmoudi, F. Kamari, S. Sadigh-Eteghad, S. H. Rasta, and M. R. Hamblin. 2018. 'Brain Photobiomodulation Therapy: a Narrative Review', Mol Neurobiol, 55: 6601-36.
34. Scherman, M., O. S. Mishina, P. Lombardi, E. Giacobino, and J. Laurat. 2012. 'Enhancing electromagnetically-induced transparency in a multilevel broadened medium', Opt Express, 20: 4346-51.
35. Shen, C. C., Y. C. Yang, T. B. Huang, S. C. Chan, and B. S. Liu. 2013. 'Neural regeneration in a novel nerve conduit across a large gap of the transected sciatic nerve in rats with low-level laser phototherapy', J Biomed Mater Res A, 101: 2763-77.
36. Shen, C. C., Y. C. Yang, and B. S. Liu. 2013. 'Effects of large-area irradiated laser phototherapy on peripheral nerve regeneration across a large gap in a biomaterial conduit', J Biomed Mater Res A, 101: 239-52.
37. Stevens, E. J., and D. R. Tomlinson. 1995. 'Effects of endothelin receptor antagonism with bosentan on peripheral nerve function in experimental diabetes', Br J Pharmacol, 115: 373-9.

Infographic: What is Red Light Therapy?

Infographic: What is Red Light Therapy?

Work from Home, Light Therapy Style

Work from Home, Light Therapy Style

This past year has shaken us up, leaving many of us in new routines that we’re still adjusting to. Unless you’re an essential worker, many of us are now working from home to reduce contact with others. Though working from home was a dream for many, it’s safe to say we didn’t imagine things working from home looking like this.  

The quick transition from in-office to working from home has left many unprepared. Aside from working under stressful conditions, most people simply brought home their laptop, thinking this would be a short-term situation. But things didn’t go as planned.

A year has passed, and those same people are still working from their kitchen table. The problem? Working from home can do more harm than good when it comes to our mental and physical health. And with that, there’s an increased risk of burning out, injuring yourself from a lack of proper office equipment, and the blurred lines between one’s personal and work life. 

So how do you divide work life from home life if your home has become your workplace? 

When all these issues compile on top of each other, it’s a recipe for disaster. More people who work from home are experiencing neck and joint pain, increased screen time, poor sleep, eye strain, and heightened stress and fatigue levels. 

Naturally, most doctors will say the remedies for these symptoms is to reduce stress by working out, meditating, going into nature, taking more breaks, massaging sore muscles, or working with proper equipment. But with lockdowns and quarantines implemented, those solutions aren’t necessarily available. 

However, red light therapy is an all-in-one treatment therapy that can promote quality sleep, reduced stress, and alleviate neck and joint pain. 

But how does red light therapy work? 

Let’s take a look at how light therapy treats neck and shoulder pain.

Most treatments for neck and shoulder pain consist of physical therapy, massage, or pain relief medication. But red light therapy has proven to be a non-invasive option for significantly reducing neck and shoulder pain. 

Red light therapy works by reducing inflammation, which is usually both the cause and symptom of neck and shoulder pain. Red and infrared light penetrates through the skin, reaching the cells that produce energy (adenosine triphosphate) in the mitochondria. By increasing the function of the mitochondria, cells make more adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and begin the process of rejuvenating and repairing themselves.

When inflammation occurs in the body, red light therapy repairs those damaged cells in the muscles, tendons, and ligaments, reducing the pain felt in the neck and shoulders.

However, as we stated earlier, red light therapy isn’t only for neck and joint pain. When it comes to inflammation, it occurs everywhere in the body, including the eyes. 

When working from home, we are typically spending three more hours per day in front of our electronic devices. This has a serious impact on eyesight and overall well being. Research has shown that red light therapy treatments can help heal the eyes from injury, reduce inflammation, and protect against vision loss. 

As we spend more time in front of our devices, we experience more fatigue and reduced quality of sleep. Red light therapy helps trigger our natural circadian rhythm and promotes improved sleep, thus reducing fatigue. 

Working from home hasn’t been the dream we’ve all hoped for. In fact, it’s negatively impacted our mental and physical health. However, there’s a solution to your symptoms and it’s red light therapy. 

Kaiyan Medical manufactures MDA-certified and FDA-approved laser light therapy devices, ideal for people who are experiencing symptoms from working from home, including eye strain, fatigue, stress, and neck and shoulder pain. 




Light Therapy & C-sections

Light Therapy & C-sections

The experience of transformation from womanhood into motherhood is a privilege reserved exclusively for women. Pregnancy and childbirth are wonderful and remarkable moments of life. Giving birth to a child can be one of the most joyful experiences too. Naturally, expectant mothers spend a lot of time thinking about how they will give birth. Although most people believe that vaginal birth is the best way to deliver, sometimes a Caesarean section cannot be avoided. As well, labor pain is one of the most intense pains experienced by women, which leads to an increase in the number of women opting to undergo a cesarean delivery. Pharmacological and nonpharmacological analgesia methods are used to control labor pain. Epidural analgesia is the most commonly used pharmacological analgesia method. However, it may have side effects on the fetus and the mother. Light-emitting diode (LED) photobiomodulation is an effective and noninvasive alternative to pharmacological methods.

Caesarean section was introduced in clinical practice as a lifesaving procedure both for the mother and the baby. It is a surgical procedure in which the incision is made on the products of conception. Caesarean birth is often used as a prophylactic measure to alleviate the problems of birth, such as cephalo pelvic disproportion, failure to progress in labor or fetal distress. A major concern in maternal and child health nursing is the increasing number of caesarean birth being performed annually. In India, primary caesarean birth is about 30.2% of births. The majority of the states are within the WHO specified range of Caesarean section (5 to 15%). Among that, five states are above the range and 12 states below the specified range. Reports also say that the prevalence of Caesarean section is generally more in the southern states. After the baby is born via C-section, the result is a wound that must heal, and pain is common during this healing process.

Wound healing acceleration and pain management in women who underwent the cesarean surgery could help them to return to their normal functioning, especially to begin breastfeeding their newborns as one of the most important aspects of newborn care. Failure incomplete healing of the wound is one of the probable complications of caesarean section. Post caesarean wound infection due to delayed wound healing and pain are not only a leading cause of prolonged hospital stay but a major cause of the widespread aversion to caesarean delivery in developing countries. Management of those problems is essential to decrease infection, length of the hospital stay, pain, and help to return for normal function.

Mothers who undergo caesarean section should achieve immediate recovery than other surgical patients because of maternal and neonatal wellbeing. Several studies have investigated many approaches and protocols of wound healing and pain management in women undergoing caesarean section. Though different approaches have been introduced, these approaches are still inadequate and unsatisfactory in many patients. Thus it seems that postoperative management in this group of people is more challenging than other surgical patients. Infrared Rays have a therapeutic effect of increasing the blood supply and relieving the pain. This will increase the supply of oxygen and nutrient available to the tissues, accelerate the removal of the waste products, and bring about the resolution of inflammation. When the heat is mild, pain relief is probably due to the sedative effect on the superficial sensory nerve endings. It also helps to achieve muscular relaxation. Infrared rays also have a physiological effect on cutaneous vasodilation due to the liberation of chemical vasodilators, histamine, and similar substance, and a possible direct effects on the blood vessels. Stronger heating of infrared stimulates the superficial nerve endings. It has been noticed that pain is due to the accumulation of waste products, and because of stronger heating, the blood flow increases and removes that waste product, and the pain is relieved. In some cases, the relief of pain is probably associated with muscle relaxation. The muscle relaxes most readily when the tissue is warm. The relief of pain itself facilitates muscle relaxation. So the infrared radiation is considered a choice of Electro Therapy Modality for wound healing and pain among mothers who underwent caesarean.

References

Hopkins K (2000) Are Brazilian women really choosing to deliver by cesarean? Soc Sci Med 51:725–740

https://doi.org/10.1590%2F1806-9282.64.11.1045

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=16192541

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=10594500

Light & Water: The Fourth Phase

Light & Water: The Fourth Phase

Water has three phases — gas, liquid, and solid; but inside Dr.Pollack’s lab, findings imply the presence of a surprisingly extensive fourth phase that occurs at interfaces. The formal name for this fourth phase is exclusion-zone water, aka EZ water. This finding may have profound implications for chemistry, physics, and biology.

The impact of surfaces on the contiguous aqueous phase is generally thought to extend no more than a few water-molecule layers. However, Dr.Pollack found that colloidal and molecular solutes are profoundly excluded from hydrophilic surfaces' vicinity to distances up to several hundred micrometers. Such large exclusion zones have been observed next to many different hydrophilic surfaces, and many diverse solutes are excluded. Hence, the exclusion phenomenon appears to be quite general.​​

Multiple methods have been applied to test whether the exclusion zone's physical properties differ from those of bulk water. NMR, infrared, and birefringence imaging, as well as measurements of electrical potential, viscosity, and UV-VIS and infrared-absorption spectra, collectively reveal that the solute-free zone is a physically distinct, ordered phase of water. It is much like a liquid crystal. It can co-exist essentially indefinitely with the contiguous solute-containing phase. Indeed, this unexpectedly extensive zone may be a candidate for the long-postulated “fourth phase” of water considered by earlier scientists.​

The energy responsible for building this charged, low entropy zone comes from light. We found that incident radiant energy, including UV, visible, and near-infrared wavelengths, induce exclusion-zone growth in a spectrally sensitive manner. IR is particularly effective. Five-minute radiation exposure at 3.1 µm (corresponding to OH stretch) causes an exclusion-zone-width increase of up to three times. Apparently, incident photons cause some change in bulk water that predisposes constituent molecules to reorganize and build the charged, ordered exclusion zone. How this occurs is under study.​

Photons from ordinary sunlight, then, may have an unexpectedly powerful effect that goes beyond mere heating. It may be that solar energy builds to order and separates charge between the near-surface exclusion zone and the bulk water beyond — the separation effectively creating a battery. This light-induced charge separation resembles the first step of photosynthesis. Indeed, this light-induced action would seem relevant not only for photosynthetic processes but also for all realms of nature involving water and interfaces.​

In conclusion, you can think of water as a battery. It’s excellent to absorb and store energy, and it’s good to transfer that energy from water molecule to water molecule (picture the ripples that happen when you drop a rock in a pond). The water molecules end up moving closer together to stabilize themselves; they become denser and more viscous and store energy in the form of a negative charge. This is EZ water. It’s like a charged battery — it’s carrying that valuable vibrational energy and is ready to deliver it. Using light therapy infrared devices from Kaiyan Medical, you can make your EZ water. The other alternative is to sunbathe naked under the sun, but that can lead you to sunburns, so we suggest our devices.

How Light Therapy Enhances Physical Therapy Treatment

How Light Therapy Enhances Physical Therapy Treatment

Though laser technology started with Albert Einstein, the technology didn’t evolve until the 1960’s when a laser prototype at Hughes Research Laboratories in Malibu, California, was first built. However, its purpose wasn’t for the medical industry; instead, for the military.

It eventually trickled down into Hollywood when Sci-Fi directors realized its potential for visual effects. But, of course, it didn’t take long for other fields to jump on the laser light bandwagon, including the medicine and rehabilitation industries. From there, the medical industry began to understand laser light’s impact on the human body when it came to healing and recovery.

Low-level (light) laser therapy (LLLT) is used to treat various conditions, including pain relief and inflammation. Over the past ten years, research and technological advancements have fine-tuned low-level light therapy, making the treatment highly effective in providing pain relief and healing treatment.

What is Low-Level Laser Light Therapy?

Before we talk about its capabilities, it’s essential to understand how it functions. Low-level laser light therapy is a non-invasive technique that gives the body a low dose of light to stimulate cellular healing. Laser light therapy targets the specific area in need to increase mobility by reducing pain and inflammation.

Low-level laser light therapy works through a process called photobiomodulation. During this process, the light is absorbed by the body’s tissue, where the cells respond with a physiological reaction, promoting cellular regeneration. The light stimulates cellular metabolism to promote cell growth and the healing of damaged cells.

How Laser Light Affects the Body

There are a couple of ways laser light therapy affects the body. Here’s what laser light therapy does for the body:

  1. Light energy is absorbed by melanin, hemoglobin, and water. The energy dissolves into heat, creating a soothing and warm sensation. The warming sensation helps patients feel relaxed.
  2. There’s an increase in ATP production in the mitochondria through light energy, the cell’s powerhouse. With increased ATP production, more energy is available for the healing process.
  3. Light energy aids with the release of nitric oxide, which enhances the circulation of damaged tissue. Increased circulation allows for improved oxygen exchange, nutrient exchange, and waste removal.
  4. Light energy releases crucial chemicals that help reduce inflammation.

So can laser light therapy be used alongside physical therapy? The answer is yes. In fact, the two treatments complement each other perfectly.

The Perfect Pair: Laser Light Therapy and Physical Therapy

With patients experiencing chronic or acute pain, the feeling of pain isn’t the main issue. However, patients can reduce pain and inflammation symptoms through laser light therapy while undergoing physical therapy treatments. Laser light therapy is ideal for pre and post-surgical procedures and during rehabilitation.

Patients undergoing laser light therapy will feel warm and soothing healing sensations as well as an immediate reduction in pain after treatment. By reducing pain, patients will improve their physical therapy performance and reduce their healing time. Ideally, four to six laser light therapy sessions are recommended to patients to receive the best results.

Whether you’re looking to improve your chiropractic, dermatology, medical or physical therapy practice, laser light therapy can provide your patients with the extra care they need to reduce chronic or acute pain and inflammation symptoms.

With many laser light products on the market, you want to make sure you’re investing in a medical-grade laser light device for your practice. Kaiyan Medical manufactures MDA-certified and FDA-approved laser light therapy devices, ideal for various medical and rehabilitation industries.

Why Chiropractors Love Light Therapy

Why Chiropractors Love Light Therapy

Chiropractors Lead the Way

LED light therapy is not new to the medical industry and certainly not new to doctors of chiropractic.

Studied for decades, the use of low-level light therapy (LLLT) — both LED and laser — has been making its way into the medical mainstream in the U.S. since the 1990s. And chiropractors have taken the lead in the clinical use of LED light therapy and are advancing the use of this technology for new applications.

This is no surprise to industry professionals and medical providers because this technology is a perfect pairing to what chiropractors advocate and bring to the medical community: healthy, drug-free healing and pain management options that are highly efficacious. Compared to the high cost and side-effect spectrum of many pharmaceutical drugs, LED light therapy can be a cost-effective alternative to drugs and surgery.

LED light therapy has the ability to increase blood flow and lymphatic circulation, decrease pain, and stimulate many cellular processes that accelerate healing. Plus, it has a high safety level, no known negative side effects is easy to administer, and is non-invasive.

Because LED light therapy can provide pain relief, wound healing and address neuropathy discomfort and various musculoskeletal issues, it is a mainstay in many clinics. Some patients also purchase light therapy systems from their chiropractors for in-home use between office visits for long-term therapy needs such as chronic pain and neuropathy.

It is also an attractive option for new chiropractors just getting started because it can bring substantial benefits to their patients while offering a fast ROI.

How it Works

LEDs deliver wavelengths of incoherent (diffused) light to the body. LEDs are similar to laser diodes, but their light spreads out, unlike the highly focused beam of coherent light that emits from a laser. This more diffused light makes administration exceptionally safe.

This therapy is also known as photobiomodulation — meaning that light can produce a cellular change in the body. Photons of light stimulate the release of nitric oxide, which

is the body’s natural vasodilator, greatly increasing circulation in the local treatment area. Blood flow is increased to nerves and other tissues, improving tissue oxygenation that stimulates healing. This boost persists for several hours after a therapy session.

Research indicates that the benefits of LED light therapy include

  • Increased circulation
  • Decreased inflammation
  • Increased ATP production
  • Collagen production
  • Accelerated exercise recovery time
  • Increased relaxation
  • Decreased stress

LEDs have low power requirements and high efficiency with minimal heat production. Power levels are measured in mW/cm2 (milliwatts per centimeter squared). And LED lifetimes are rated up to 100,000 hours and can last for decades.

The most common device wavelengths are the following:

  • Near-infrared: Many LED therapy devices use the 800 nanometers (nm) range; however, infrared include a much wider spectrum with deep penetration up to 100 mm.
  • Red: 630 to 700 nm, with penetration up to 10 mm.
  • Blue: 405 to 470 nm, with penetration up to 3 mm (beneficial for skin and wound healing).
  • Pulsed frequency(s) or continuous wave devices provide timed sequences of light turning on and off during application, which is thought to accelerate change in the tissues.
  • Continuous-wave devices are always on; no frequency is added to the light.
Applications for Use

Light therapy is commonly used to treat acute and chronic joint pain in the neck, back, leg, shoulder, wrist, knee, and ankle. It can be helpful for arthritis pain, bruises, carpal tunnel syndrome, and musculoskeletal conditions. It is also used to treat skin conditions such as pressure ulcers, wound healing, and scar tissue reduction.

Even NASA has good things to say about light therapy. NASA issued a news release in December 2000, which stated that doctors at Navy Special Warfare Command centers in Norfolk, Virginia, and San Diego reported a 40 percent improvement in patients who had musculoskeletal training injuries treated with light-emitting diodes.1

There are distinct advantages to using LED therapy devices in your clinical practice. For example, Patients can be left unattended during therapy, maximizing staff resources. Large surface areas can be covered by the LED pad or panel, delivering therapeutic photons broadly and safely to the body's targeted area. And systems are generally portable and user friendly.

Moreover, LED light therapy can help you enter niche markets, such as peripheral neuropathy and brain injuries. These are areas where LED light therapy is appearing to be more effective than pharmaceutical approaches.

Brain injuries

An increasing number of scientific studies show expanded indications for LED light therapy to treat neurologic conditions, especially brain injuries and degeneration. The advanced research being done by Michael Hamblin, Ph.D., and his group and by Margaret A. Naeser, Ph.D., at Boston University demonstrates that LED light therapy can positively affect the brain. Naeser’s 2017 study with veterans showed significant improvement after 12 weeks of transcranial photobiomodulation.

Increased function, better sleep, fewer angry outbursts, and less anxiety and wandering were reported with no negative side effects.2

Preliminary brain studies conducted by other groups using transcranial LED light therapy show impressively improved brain blood flow verified before and after single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) brain scans. These brain studies have implications for patients presenting with such conditions as traumatic brain injury (TBI), PTSD, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, concussions, strokes, and depression.

Nearly all neurological disorders have one thing in common: diminished blood flow. And increased circulation and blood flow are precisely what LED light therapy promotes.

Peripheral Neuropathy

More than 3 million new cases of peripheral neuropathy are diagnosed each year in the U.S. alone. LED light therapy has shown significant results in relieving this condition's discomfort and improving sensation, as evidenced by several studies.

Adding LED light therapy systems can help you offer neuropathy therapy as a substantial part of your practice.

FDA Approved

LED light therapy devices have received FDA clearances that temporarily increase local circulation; and the temporary relief of pain, stiffness, and muscle spasms. Many practitioners are hopeful that the FDA will keep expanding clearances for this cutting-edge healing technology.

References
NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center. “NASA Space Technology Shines Light On Healing.” ScienceDaily. http://www.sciencedaily.com/ releases/2000/12/001219195848.htm. Published Dec. 2000. Accessed Jan. 2018.

Salmarche AE, Naeser MA, Ho KF, Hamblin MR, Lim L. Significant Improvement in Cognition in Mild to Moderately Severe Dementia Cases Treated with Transcranial Plus Intranasal Photobiomodulation:

Case Series Report. Photomed Laser Surg. 2017;5(8):432–441.

Fallah A, Mirzaei A, Gutknecht N, Demneh AS. Clinical effectiveness of low-level

laser treatment on peripheral somatosen- sory neuropathy. Lasers Med Sci. 2017 Apr;32(3):721–728.

Mandelbaum-Livnat MM, Almog M, Nissan M, Loeb E, Shapira Y, Rochkind

Photobiomodulation Triple Treatment in Peripheral Nerve Injury: Nerve and Muscle Response. Photomed Laser Surg. 2016;34(12):638–645.



Insomnia & the Dark Side of the Blue Light

Insomnia & the Dark Side of the Blue Light

Although it is environmentally friendly, blue light can affect your sleep and potentially cause disease. Until the advent of artificial lighting, the sun was the major lighting source, and people spent their evenings in (relative) darkness. Now, in much of the world, evenings are illuminated, and we take our easy access to all those lumens pretty much for granted.

But we may be paying the price for basking in all that light. At night, light throws the body’s biological clock — the circadian rhythm — out of whack. Sleep suffers. Worse, research shows that it may contribute to the causation of cancer, diabetes, heart disease, and obesity.

What is Blue Light?

Not all colors of light have the same effect. Blue wavelengths — which are beneficial during daylight hours because they boost attention, reaction times, and mood — seem to be the most disruptive at night. And the proliferation of electronics with screens and energy-efficient lighting increases our exposure to blue wavelengths, especially after sundown.

Light and Sleep

Everyone has slightly different circadian rhythms, but the average length is 24 and one-quarter hours. The circadian rhythm of people who stay up late is slightly longer, while earlier birds' rhythms fall short of 24 hours. Dr. Charles Czeisler of Harvard Medical School showed, in 1981, that daylight keeps a person’s internal clock aligned with the environment.

Is Nighttime Light Exposure Bad?

Some studies suggest a link between exposure to light at night, such as working the night shift, diabetes, heart disease, and obesity. That’s not proof that nighttime light exposure causes these conditions, nor is it clear why it could be bad for us.

A Harvard study shed a little bit of light on the possible connection to diabetes and possibly obesity. The researchers put 10 people on a schedule that gradually shifted the timing of their circadian rhythms. Their blood sugar levels increased, throwing them into a prediabetic state, and leptin levels, a hormone that leaves people feeling full after a meal, went down.

Exposure to light suppresses the secretion of melatonin, a hormone that influences circadian rhythms. Even dim light can interfere with a person’s circadian rhythm and melatonin secretion. A mere eight lux — a level of brightness exceeded by most table lamps and about twice that of a night light — effects, notes Stephen Lockley, a Harvard sleep researcher. Light at night is part of the reason so many people don’t get enough sleep, says Lockley, and researchers have linked short sleep to increased risk for depression, as well as diabetes and cardiovascular problems.

Effects of Blue Light and Sleep

While light of any kind can suppress melatonin's secretion, blue light at night does so more powerfully. Harvard researchers and their colleagues experimented comparing the effects of 6.5 hours of exposure to blue light to exposure to green light of comparable brightness. The blue light suppressed melatonin for about twice as long as the green light and shifted circadian rhythms by twice as much (3 hours vs. 1.5 hours).

In another blue light study, researchers at the University of Toronto compared the melatonin levels of people exposed to bright indoor light wearing blue-light-blocking goggles to people exposed to regular dim light without wearing goggles. The fact that the hormone levels were about the same in the two groups strengthens the hypothesis that blue light is a potent suppressor of melatonin. It also suggests that shift workers and night owls could protect themselves if they wore eyewear that blocks blue light. Inexpensive sunglasses with orange-tinted lenses block blue light, but they also block other colors, so they’re not suitable for use indoors at night. Glasses that block out only blue light can cost up to $80.

LED Blue Light Exposure

If blue light does have adverse health effects, then environmental concerns, and the quest for energy-efficient lighting, could be at odds with personal health. Those curlicue compact fluorescent lightbulbs and LED lights are much more energy-efficient than the old-fashioned incandescent lightbulbs we grew up with. But they also tend to produce more blue light.

The physics of fluorescent lights can’t be changed, but coatings inside the bulbs can produce a warmer, less blue light. LED lights are more efficient than fluorescent lights, but they also produce a fair amount of light in the blue spectrum. Richard Hansler, a light researcher at John Carroll University in Cleveland, notes that ordinary incandescent lights also produce some blue light, although less than most fluorescent lightbulbs.

Protect Yourself from Blue Light at Night
  • Use any of our red light devices for night lights. Red light is less likely to shift circadian rhythm and suppress melatonin.
  • Avoid looking at bright screens beginning two to three hours before bed.
  • If you work a night shift or use many electronic devices at night, consider wearing blue-blocking glasses or installing an app that filters the blue/green wavelength at night.
  • Expose yourself to lots of bright light during the day, which will boost your ability to sleep at night, as well as your mood and alertness during daylight.

50% Greater Growth in Muscles with Red Light Therapy

50% Greater Growth in Muscles with Red Light Therapy

One study randomly divided participants into two separate groups for an 8-week training program. One group received a red light treatment before every training session, while the other group did the same training without the light treatment. They found that the group receiving the light therapy improved muscle growth 50% greater than those with muscle training alone. Pretty amazing, right?

Another randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study using red and infrared light on the biceps demonstrated peak and average performance of more than 12% more than the control group. But while this is all very interesting, I’m sure you’re wondering whether Red Light Therapy is worth it and what it can do for YOU. First of all, I’m sure many of you appreciate the science breakdown, but some of you may not be able to follow, so here’s a simple explanation.

Scientists have discovered that our cells show an incredible response to light, but not just any light. Only in the 660–850 nanometer (nm) range which is the so-called red light range. This type of light energy penetrates deep into the skin, muscle, and joint tissue and stimulates ATP production, which you should think of as your body’s way of transporting energy to where it needs to go. More ATP means more efficient energy transfers in layman's terms, which translates to various benefits at a cellular level.

So, by exposing our body to the therapeutic red light, our cells receive this rejuvenating, anti-aging energy boost that enables them to perform every single function at a heightened level and now that you understand the science behind it, let’s a look at the 5 reasons why it might be a good idea for you to invest in this technology.

Increased Energy & Testosterone

Sometimes we feel lethargic and out of energy, like our body is constantly running on empty. Then you spend some time outside on a nice hot summer day, and you all of a sudden feel amazing? It’s because our bodies rely on light as a source of energy, helping our glands to regulate adrenaline, testosterone, metabolism, and several other functions, and it has been shown that Red Light Therapy can increase testosterone production, which in turn can increase overall energy levels and even improve peak muscle performance.

Reduced Muscle Recovery Time

After a challenging workout, your body works around the clock to repair and strengthen torn muscle fibers. We know this. We also know that nutrition plays a huge role in providing the body with the resources it needs for this process. But what most of you don’t know is that specific wavelengths of light play a role in this process. By enhancing mitochondrial function, red light has been proven to produce measurable gains in peak strength and reduced recovery times.

Faster Healing For Joint & Muscle Injuries

Injuries, repetitive motion, or aging, in general, can lead to severe joint pain and tissue damage. But the body’s natural healing response can be greatly accelerated by red and infrared light. Also, relief from pain, faster recovery times, and reduced arthritis symptoms are just a few more of Red Light Therapy's benefits. For bodybuilders, yes, Red Light is also great for reducing Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness or DOMS. After all, it’s a type of muscle tissue injury as well.

Healthier & Younger-Looking Skin

Red Light Therapy can improve skin clarity, tone, and texture, reduce fine lines, wrinkles, and puffy eyes, help fade scars, acne, and stretch marks, even enhance wound healing and circulation, simply by increasing the production of collagen and elastin.

Remember, collagen is a long-chain amino acid and the most abundant protein in the body. It’s responsible for giving skin its elasticity, hair its strength, and connective tissue its ability to hold everything in place. In fact, the collagen protein makes up 30% of the total protein in the body and 70% of the protein in the skin!

Now while collagen is beneficial to the entire body, it’s most noticeably beneficial to the skin. This is because as we age, the epidermic (or outer layer of skin) thins and loses elasticity in a process known as elastosis. As this happens, we tend to show more aging signs and acquire more wrinkles and stretch marks. But by restoring normal cellular function, because red light stimulates collagen production, red light therapy can help keep your skin looking healthier and younger for LONGER.

Stress Relief

You can’t argue that our minds and body are under constant stress because of our busy lives. Well, Red Light Therapy has been proven to calm our physical and mental state by reducing oxidative stress. Now, I cannot personally attest to that, simply because my stress is through the roof, and other times, I get my mind right and relax, but it makes sense. Oxidative stress is not just harmful to our physical health but also our mental state as well.


Light Therapy and Orthopedic Surgery

Light Therapy and Orthopedic Surgery

At some point in most of our lives, we’re all going to encounter a visit with an orthopedic doctor. As a society, we’re constantly straining our muscles, joints, ligaments, and tendons. 

In addition, nutrient deficiencies are incredibly common as more people resort to eating processed and fast food for their meals. With a lack of nutrition, our bones, joints, and muscles do not receive what they need to sustain themselves and remain healthy. 

Conditions such as Osteroporsosis—or bone loss—can create pain, inflammation, and bone breakage. Other nutrition deficiencies can cause low immunity, muscle weakness, and joint issues. 

Of course, nutritional deficiency isn’t the only reason someone can suffer from joint, muscle, tendon, or ligament issues. Aside from doing repetitive movements, athletes are more prone to muscle, tendon, ligament, and joint injuries. 

Whatever the cause may be, there’s one thing they all have in common: people with these types of injuries often need to be seen by an orthopedic surgeon. 

For some people, physical therapy can help; however, more people have to undergo orthopedic surgeries. Today, the most common orthopedic surgeries are ACL reconstruction, knee, hip, and shoulder replacements. If there’s one thing everyone who’s experienced orthopedic surgery can say, it’s that recovery can be extremely challenging and lengthy. 

Sadly, there’s not much one can do when recovering from orthopedic surgery. You simply have to wait until the operated area heals naturally. But, there is one specific treatment that aids the post-recovery period and prevents future joint issues. What is it? It’s red light therapy, of course! 

Red light therapy works by enhancing energy within your body’s cells, which works to repair any damaged cells in the body. By repairing damaged cells in the body, it reduces pain and inflammation, increasing the recovery period. 

Red light therapy has proven to achieve a few things:

  • It stimulates cells to remove toxins
  • Increases oxygen flow to the cells
  • Blocks pain signals in the brain and releases endorphins and enkephalin (a natural pain killer in the body)
  • Jumpstarts the body’s healing process by stimulating the mitochondria in the cells.

That said, red light therapy can be used to treat a wide range of joint, muscle, tendon, ligament, and bone injuries. The reason why it works on a wide scale of injuries is due to the fact it can treat various tissues within the body, reducing inflammation and pain. 

A review by Harvard Medical School and the University of Sydney found that laser therapy can be effective for treating:


  • Post-surgical pain
  • Tendonitis
  • Muscular back pain
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome
  • Cervical or lumbar radiculopathy
  • Epicondylitis
  • Osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis
  • Whiplash injury
  • Frozen shoulder
  • Tendinopathy
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Sprains and strains

Red light therapy is also highly used within the athletic community to speed up the healing process, help players get back on the field, and prevent future injuries. 

Through red light therapy, it prevents muscle soreness, fatigue, and aids in recovery. By having the muscles recover quickly, red light therapy reduces inflammation, allowing the muscle to heal and avert future injuries.

From mild to severe joint, muscle, ligaments, bone, and tendon conditions, red light therapy improves recovery time and aids the healing process. The beauty is that this therapy is entirely possible to undergo from the comfort of your own home.
Lunas red light therapy devices provide high-quality at-home treatments to help you make the most out of your recovery. With red light therapy, not only will you recover from surgery, but you’ll feel even better than before.

PEMF Therapy in the Treatment of Osteoporosis and Similar Conditions

PEMF Therapy in the Treatment of Osteoporosis and Similar Conditions

Osteoporosis is a systemic skeletal disease, characterized by the reduction of bone mass and the skeletal architecture's impairment as a whole. Theron is essentially disease's definitions on anatomopathological criteria, which attribute to the skeleton particular characteristics of fragility, such as making bone prone to fracture even after minor trauma.

Skeletal fragility can be diagnosed, thanks to current sensitometric methods, even in the absence of symptoms and fractures. Being a condition that heightens the risk of fracture, but that does not make itself necessary for the definition of the disease, osteoporosis can evolve in a completely asymptomatic way for a long time, in some cases even for a lifetime.

The US FDA has approved pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) as a safe and effective treatment for nonunion of bone. Despite its clinical use, the mechanisms of action of electromagnetic stimulation of the skeleton have been elusive. Recently, cell membrane receptors have been identified as the site of action of PEMF and provide a mechanistic rationale for clinical use. This review highlights key processes in cell responses to PEMF as follows: (1) signal transduction through A2A and A3 adenosine cell membrane receptors and (2) dose-response effects on the synthesis of structural and signaling extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Through these actions, PEMF can increase bone and cartilage's structural integrityECM's structural integrity, enhance enhance repair, and alter the homeostatic balance of signaling cytokines, producing anti-inflammatory effects. PEMFs exert a pro anabolic effect on the bone and cartilage matrix and a chondroprotective effect counteracting inflammation's catabolic effects in the joint environment. Understanding of PEMF membrane targets and the specific intracellular pathways involved, culminating in the synthesis of ECM proteins and reducing inflammatory cytokines, should enhance confidence in the clinical use of PEMF and identify clinical conditions likely to be affected by PEMF exposure.

The musculoskeletal system is highly responsive to its physicochemical environment. Bone and cartilage cells respond to changes in mechanical stress, fluid flow, pH, and pO2 by altering their phenotype and expressing a range of signaling and structural molecules that result, in particular, in an altered extracellular matrix (ECM) organization and associated biomechanical properties. Response to mechanical stress is perhaps the best recognized and intuitively obvious skeletal environmental condition, facilitating adaptation and modeling to changing biomechanical and environmental requirements, perhaps through intermediary strain-associated signaling events. In addition to mechanical stress, skeletal tissues, both bone, and cartilage, demonstrate an exquisite sensitivity to electrical and electromagnetic stimulation.

Responses of skeletal cells to pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) have been exploited therapeutically with devices that expose tissues to appropriately configured fields to stimulate ECM synthesis for bone and cartilage repair. This review highlights key processes in cell responses to PEMF as follows: (1) signal transduction through cell membrane adenosine receptors (ARs), (2) the activation of osteoinductive pathways, and (3) the synthesis of skeletal ECM including structural and signaling molecules. These actions are reflected physiologically in the bone as the healing of fractures, osteotomies, nonunions, and joints, as the modulation of cartilage damage and reduction in catabolic and inflammatory cytokines in arthritis. Understanding the cellular responses to PEMF will inform clinical studies, may point to key issues that need further investigation, and will be relevant in promoting bone and cartilage repair, tissue engineering and regeneration in a repair mode, and damping inflammation in arthritis. Understanding the pathways of the activity of PEMFs provides a solid mechanistic basis for their clinical use.

There is strong evidence supporting a role for adenosine and its receptors in bone homeostasis and skeletal pathology, including osteoporosis and arthritis.4 Furthermore, adenosine, acting through the A2A receptor, inhibits osteoclast differentiation, and increases the rate of new bone formation in bone defects.5 A2A signaling also promotes the Wnt/β-catenin pathway regulating bone formation.6

Although the transmembrane signal recognition processes of PEMF are incompletely understood, the specific mechanism of interaction between PEMF and the cell membrane was reported by Varani et al.7 They identified for the first time that ARs were the main target of PEMF stimulation in inflammatory cells; ARs play a pivotal role in the regulation of inflammatory processes, with both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory effects.8 It has been demonstrated that PEMF exposure induces a notable increase in A2A and A3 AR density on the cell membrane of chondrocytes, synoviocytes, and osteoblasts8 (Figure 1). Notably, A1 and A2B receptors were not influenced by the same exposure conditions. Moreover, in the presence of the specific A2A receptor agonist, PEMF exposure synergized with the agonist and induced a notable increase in intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels. On the contrary, the specific A2A receptor antagonist's presence blocked the effects of both the agonist and PEMF stimulation, suggesting that PEMFs specifically act through the activation of A2A ARs with a pharmacologic-like mechanism. The agonist activity of PEMF for the A2A and the A3 ARs is particularly relevant because it inhibits the NF-kB pathway, a key regulator of the expression of matrix metalloproteinases and several genes involved in responses to inflammation.9 Cohen et al. 10 showed in vivo that an experimental A2A agonist drug reduced cartilage damage in a rabbit model of septic arthritis of the knee. These observations formed the basis for the application of PEMF for chondroprotection of articular cartilage from the catabolic effects of joint inflammation, as discussed in more detail later.

Despite its clinical use, the mechanisms of action of electromagnetic stimulation of the skeleton have been elusive, and PEMF has been viewed as a “black box.” In the past 25 years, research has successfully identified cell membrane receptors and osteoinductive pathways as sites of action of PEMF and provides a mechanistic rationale for clinical use. Understanding of PEMF membrane targets and the specific intracellular and extracellular pathways involved, culminating in the synthesis of ECM proteins and reduction in inflammatory cytokines, should enhance confidence in the clinical use of PEMF and the identification of clinical conditions likely to be affected by PEMF exposure.

The biological effects of PEMF treatment and favorable effects on the skeletal system are the results of notable research efforts conducted internationally by the orthopedic community. They have attracted much interest from other medical specialties such as wound and tendon healing, rheumatology, and neurology that may be able to take advantage of the experiences developed with bone and cartilage treatments.

References

De Mattei M, Fini M, Setti S, et al.: Proteoglycan synthesis in bovine articular cartilage explants exposed to different low-frequency low-energy pulsed electromagnetic fields. Osteoarthritis Cartilage 2007;15:163–168.

Parent D, Franco-Obregon A, Frohlich J, et al.: Enhancement of mesenchymal stem cell chondrogenesis with short-term low intensity pulsed electromagnetic fields. Sci Rep 2017;7:9421.

Aaron RK, Ciombor DM, Keeping H, Wang S, Capuano A, Polk C: Power frequency fields promote cell differentiation coincident with an increase in transforming growth factor-beta(1) expression. Bioelectromagnetics 1999;20:453–458.

Ham J, Evans BA: An emerging role for adenosine and its receptors in bone homeostasis. Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) 2012;3:113.

Mediero A, Wilder T, Cronstein B: Adenosine receptors stimulate bone regeneration, in Biology and Pathology of Bone and Joint: Osteoclasts, Osteoblasts and Bone Remodeling. Boston, MA, ACR/ARP Annual Meeting, 2014, Abstract 19.

Borhani S, Corciulo C, Larranaga Vera A, Cronstein B: Signaling at adenosine A2A receptor (A2aR) in osteoblasts; crosstalk with Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, in Osteoarthritis and Joint Biology — Basic Science Poster I. Chicago, IL, ACR/ARP Annual Meeting, 2018, Abstract 1047.

Varani K, Gessi S, Merighi S, et al.: Effect of low-frequency electromagnetic fields on A2A adenosine receptors in human neutrophils. Br J Pharmacol 2002;136:57–66.

Varani K, Vincenzi F, Ravani A, et al.: Adenosine receptors as a biological pathway for the anti-inflammatory and beneficial effects of low-frequency low energy pulsed electromagnetic fields. Mediators Inflamm 2017;2017:2740963.

Massari L, Benazzo F, Falez F, et al.: Biophysical stimulation of bone and cartilage: State of the art and future perspectives. Int Orthop, 2019;43:539–551.

Cohen SB, Gill SS, Baer GS, Leo BM, Scheld WM, Diduch DR: Reducing joint destruction due to septic arthrosis using an adenosine2A receptor agonist. J Orthop Res 2004;22:427–435.

Aaron RK, Boyan B, Ciombor DM, Schwartz Z, Simon BJ: Stimulation of growth factor by electric and electromagnetic fields. Clin Orthop Rel Res 2004;419:30–37.

Aaron RK, Wang S, Ciombor DM: Upregulation of basal TGFß1 levels by EMF coincident with chondrogenesis — skeletal repair and tissue engineering implications. J Orthop Res 2002;20:233–240.

13. Zhou J, He H, Yang L, et al.: Effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields on bone mass and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway in ovariectomized rats. Arch Med Res 2012;43:274–282.

Lin CC, Lin RW, Chang CW, Wang GJ, Lai KA: Single-pulsed electromagnetic field therapy increases osteogenic differentiation through Wnt signaling pathway and sclerostin downregulation. Bioelectromagnetics 2015;36:494–505.

Cai J, Shao X, Yang Q, et al.: Pulsed electromagnetic fields modify the adverse effects of glucocorticoids on bone architecture, bone strength, and porous implant osseointegration rescuing bone-anabolic actions. Bone 2020;133:115266.

Zhai M, Jing D, Tong S, et al.: Pulsed electromagnetic fields promote in vitro osteoblastogenesis through a Wnt/beta-catenin signaling-associated mechanism. Bioelectromagnetics 2016;37:152–162.

Jing D, Li F, Jiang M, et al.: Pulsed electromagnetic fields improve bone microstructure and strength in ovariectomized rats through a Wnt/Lrp5/beta-catenin signaling-associated mechanism. PLoS One 2013;8:e79377.

Wu S, Yu Q, Lai A, Tian J: Pulsed electromagnetic field induces Ca(2+)-dependent osteoblastogenesis in C3H10T1/2 mesenchymal cells through the Wnt-Ca(2+)/Wnt-beta-catenin signaling pathway. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2018;503:715–721.

Pan Y, Dong Y, Hou W, et al.: Effects of PEMF on microcirculation and angiogenesis in a model of acute hindlimb ischemia in diabetic rats. Bioelectromagnetics 2013;34:180–188.

Tepper OM, Callaghan MJ, Chang EI, et al.: Electromagnetic fields increase in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis through endothelial release of FGF-2. FASEB J 2004;18:1231–1233.

Hopper RA, VerHalen JP, Tepper O, et al.: Osteoblasts stimulated with pulsed electromagnetic fields increase HUVEC proliferation via a VEGF-A independent mechanism. Bioelectromagnetics 2009;30:189–197.

Goto T, Fujioka M, Ishida M, Kuribayashi M, Ueshima K, Kubo T: Noninvasive up-regulation of angiopoietin-2 fibroblast growth factor-2 in bone marrow by pulsed electromagnetic field therapy. J Orthop Sci 2010;15:661–665.

Petecchia L, Sbrana F, Utzeri R, et al.: Electro-magnetic field promotes osteogenic differentiation of BM-hMSCs through a selective action on Ca(2+)-related mechanisms. Sci Rep 2015;5:13856.

Pro Athletes Harnessing the Power of Red Light

Pro Athletes Harnessing the Power of Red Light

Originally from https://www.lunaspanel.com/post/pro-athletes-harnessing-the-power-of-red-light


Being a professional athlete is no joke, and when your body is a central part of your job, it needs to be very well taken care of. And even when athletes are doing all the right things to take care of their body, injuries are still widespread in professional sports; but it used to be that their career was over if an athlete was injured. But now, athletes can undergo surgery and pop back up on the court or field months later. How is that possible?

As most athletes know, a large portion of time is dedicated to repairing muscles and alleviating inflammation for the next game. Regardless of the sport, teams spend millions of dollars on professional physical therapists to guarantee their athletes receive the highest physical treatment standard.

The recovery process for an athlete is essential and a determining factor of how well they’ll perform during their careers. You’ll often hear the words “optimizing performance” when discussing the recovery process for athletes. Today, the recovery process isn’t just to heal an athlete but to naturally enhance their performance.

So, how do professional therapists optimize professional athletes’ performance and recovery? Well, red light therapy is turning out to be one of the most effective treatments for these high-performing individuals.

Professional trainers are always looking for natural ways to enhance their player’s performance. With light has proven to be a lead modality, many trainers and athletes use light therapy to enhance the body’s natural healing process. But how does it work?

When used, natural red light penetrates the skin and cells. When the light reaches the mitochondria, it stimulates the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). ATP is a natural energy currency in the human body. With an enhanced ATP production, cells in the muscle are optimized and repaired faster.

Hundreds of peer-reviewed clinical trials have backed up the results athletes see on the courts and fields. In 2015, researchers conducted a meta-analysis of placebo-controlled trials, and the results were astounding. They found that most clinical trials showed “significant improvement for the main measures related to performance,” including endurance and speed. And through this meta-analysis, it was concluded that “phototherapy (with lasers and LEDs) improves muscular performance and accelerates recovery when applied before exercise.”

However, red light therapy does more than recover muscle tissue. It also increases muscle strength, ultimately improving physical performance.

A 2016 study researched red light therapy on elite athletes and trained and untrained athletes. What was found was that red light therapy after training could increase muscle mass. So, not only does red light therapy accelerate the recovery process, but it also improves muscle strength.

But what about endurance? Being strong is only one aspect of being an athlete. Endurance is crucial when competing against an opponent. A triple-blind, placebo-controlled trial published in 2018 studied the effects of red light therapy on men and women undergoing endurance training on treadmills. It was found that red light therapy pre-exercise can “increase the time-to-exhaustion and oxygen uptake and also decrease the body fat in healthy volunteers when compared to placebo.”

Another study from 2018 completed by Brazilian researchers found that after their randomized, triple-blind, placebo-controlled trial on pro soccer players, those who underwent red light therapy stayed longer on the playing field. It was concluded that light therapy “…had a significant improvement in all the biochemical markers evaluated…pre-exercise [light] therapy can enhance performance and accelerate recovery…”.

Peer-reviewed clinical trials worldwide have all concluded the same thing: red light therapy works for increasing athletic performance levels. Luna’s red light therapy device can help professional athletes and the rest of us exercise regularly, recover from injuries, and improve our physical and muscular health.

Light Therapy & Diabetes

Light Therapy & Diabetes

DAccording to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 100 million adults in the United States suffer from diabetes or pre-diabetes. A chronic disease characterized by elevated blood glucose levels (blood sugar), diabetes develops because the body doesn’t make enough insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas. Low insulin levels cause glucose to build up in the blood, resulting in various health problems, some severe.

There are three types of diabetes: type 1, type 2, and gestational. Whichever type you may have, light therapy could be the treatment solution you’ve been looking for. This article will explore red light and near-infrared (NIR) light for diabetes: a novel solution that helps treat this disease's complications at the cellular level — healing from the inside out.

Red and Near-Infrared Light for Diabetes

While some people with type 2 diabetes (also called adult-onset diabetes) can achieve target blood sugar levels with lifestyle changes, diabetes medications, or insulin therapy may also be needed to control blood sugar. Many medications cause serious side effects. Diabetes has no cure, and symptom management is the only way to coax the disease into remission.

Red and NIR light has been used successfully to treat the complications associated with diabetes. Before we delve into that, let’s do a quick overview of what this treatment method actually is.

Red light therapy, also called low-level light therapy (LLLT) or photobiomodulation, is an umbrella term referring to the red light and NIR light. It uses powerful light-emitting diode (LED) bulbs to deliver intense beams of red and NIR wavelengths to bare skin.

Wavelengths of light are measured in nanometers (nm). Research has shown that red wavelengths from 630nm to 660nm, and NIR wavelengths from 810nm to 850nm, have the greatest scope of benefits — and come with no side effects.

Although studies often focus on either red or near-infrared wavelengths, experts say the best treatment approach is to use both. Doing so will provide skin-deep as well as deep-tissue benefits. For example, the 630nm to 660nm wavelengths address the skin's health, and the longer 810nm to 850nm NIR wavelengths penetrate deeper into the body. NIR wavelengths can even penetrate bone and hard connective tissue like cartilage.

Increase Capillary Formation for Improved Blood Flow

Thomas Burke, Ph.D., a retired physiologist with the University of Colorado Medical School, has studied blood flow — specifically changes in blood flow — for more than 30 years. Dr. Burke’s extensive research into the effects of red light therapy on circulation has led him to conclude that infrared light increases blood flow in any site in the body to which it is applied. This has profound implications for treating slow-healing wounds such as diabetic foot ulcers, which affect approximately 15 percent of patients with diabetes.

One effect of diabetes is meager amounts of nitric oxide produced by the body, which hinders normal blood flow. This is one reason people with diabetes often develop a circulatory condition called peripheral arterial disease, in which narrowed blood vessels reduce blood flow to the limbs. Many diabetes patients also develop diabetic neuropathy, a peripheral nervous system disorder that causes loss of feeling in the extremities, especially the feet.

The combination of poor blood flow and neuropathy can make people with diabetes more susceptible to ulcers or infections in the feet that, if allowed to spread, may require extreme measures such as amputation. LLLT can help circulation by stimulating the formation of tiny capillaries in areas treated by the light. This allows for better oxygen and nutrient delivery to the body’s peripheral regions, including the feet, which seem to bear the brunt of diabetic complications.

Increased Cellular Metabolism and Energy

The decreased blood flow that’s characteristic of diabetes interferes with the proper functioning of mitochondria, the “energy factories” inside most body cells. When mitochondria function normally, their primary job is to produce adenosine triphosphate (ATP), an energy-rich molecule that serves as fuel for cells. ATP is essential for normal cellular functioning, including repair and replication.

Poor cellular energy, officially known as mitochondrial dysfunction, is one of the main causes of diabetic neuropathy, so restoring normal mitochondrial function is essential. When there’s a chronic blood sugar imbalance, cells become stressed, unable to function properly, and unable to repair themselves.

Low-level light therapy addresses mitochondrial dysfunction by increasing ATP production. This, in turn, energizes cells and sparks a chain reaction of beneficial biological processes and improved health. When mitochondrial function is returned to normal, it supports skin ulcers and neuropathic pain and helps restore normal peripheral nervous system functioning.

Restored Normal Nerve Functioning

Until LLLT was developed, loss of sensation in the feet of diabetics was considered progressive and irreversible. Even today, the recommended treatment is often anti-inflammatory drugs that interrupt pain pathways. These drugs do not address the underlying problem: abnormal nerve signaling due to inflammation and mitochondrial dysfunction.

Today, diabetic neuropathy can be treated using near-infrared light. According to a 2015 study by medical researchers from Iran, NIR light therapy effectively reduces neuropathic pain and promotes damaged nerve cells' regeneration.

An earlier study by researchers from Japan also focused on LLLT’s effects on nerve regeneration. It is known that disrupted blood sugar levels can lead to oxidative stress, which can cause inflammation. The study revealed that NIR light acts as an antioxidant and reduces inflammation, conducive to nerve regeneration.

Increased Collagen Production

Diabetes can cause uncomfortable, often painful changes in the skin, including severe dryness, peeling, cracking, and abnormal callus growth. Red light therapy boosts the body’s natural collagen production so that as skin cells are renewed, the damaged skin can be gradually replaced by healthy skin. Improved blood flow and cellular functioning also support healthy skin growth.

Reduced Inflammation for Faster Wound Healing

Diabetic foot ulcers may form due to a combination of poor circulation, immune system deficiency that makes it hard for the body to fight off infection, diminished foot sensitivity (diabetic neuropathy), and ill-fitting shoes. Infected and dead tissue will need to be removed. The growth of healthy new tissue needs to be supported with blood sugar management and optimal mitochondrial functioning, and collagen production.

A Stronger Immune System

Improving health requires a robust immune system, and LLLT can help in several significant ways. For instance, it stimulates the production of stem cells, which are the body’s master cells with the potential to develop into many different types of cells. Stem cells remain in a dormant, non-specialized state until they are needed, when they are mobilized into action and carried to various parts of the body where they take on specialized roles.

Also essential for a healthy immune system is the thyroid, which LLLT helps to balance. People with diabetes have an increased risk of developing hypothyroidism, which is an underactive thyroid. Hypothyroidism results in mitochondrial dysfunction and poor cell functioning.

Also, research has shown that LLLT supports liver regeneration for more efficient waste disposal. This helps treat systemic inflammation and supports the workings of the immune system.

Consistency

LLLT is not an instant cure for any condition. You may experience relief after just one session, but the greatest results will come with time as the body’s cells regenerate and optimize their functioning. This can take a few weeks to a few months. Several sessions per week can help manage and minimize diabetic complications and keep the disease in remission on an ongoing basis.

Laser Acupuncture Treatment?

Laser Acupuncture Treatment?

Acupuncture under traditional Chinese medicine is an alternative medicine that treats patients by needle insertion and manipulation at acupoints (APS) in the body. Acupuncture causes collagen fiber contraction, resulting in soluble actin polymerization and actin stress fiber formation, affecting the nervous and immune systems. Besides, acupuncture leads to molecular changes at APs in tissues at the cellular level. The local physicochemical reactions at the APs send signals to the organs via the tissue fluid and blood circulatory systems for optimal adjustment of the body’s organs.

It is believed to have been practiced for more than 2500 years, and this modality is among the oldest healing practices in the world. Acupuncture is based on the idea that living beings have Qi, defined as inner energy, and that it is an imbalance in Qi or interruption in the flow of Qi that causes illness and disease. Acupuncture therapy is focused on rebalancing the flow of Qi, and the practice is progressively gaining credibility as a primary or adjuvant therapy by Western medical providers.

Laser Acupuncture

Kaiyan Medical has been working to create ergonomic laser pens to simulate the acupuncture process. Laser acupuncture (LA) — non-thermal, low-intensity laser irradiation to stimulate acupuncture points — has become more common among acupuncture practitioners in recent years. LA is a safer, pain-free alternative to traditional acupuncture, with minimal adverse effects and greater versatility. LA has many features that make it an attractive option as a treatment modality, including minimal sensation, short duration of treatment, and minimal risks of infection, trauma, and bleeding complications.

What is the Difference

In acupuncture, needles are inserted at specific acupoints, which may be manually stimulated in various ways, including gentle twisting or up-and-down movements. Besides, the depth of needle penetration is also manipulated by the acupuncture practitioner. The patient may report sensations of De Qi, which are feelings of pressure, warmth, or tingling in the superficial layers of the skin. Many theories to explain how acupuncture works have been proposed, including the gate-control theory of pain and the endorphin-and-neurotransmitter. Others have postulated that acupuncture modulates the transmission of pain signals and alters the release of endogenous endorphins and neurotransmitters, resulting in physiologic changes.

One clear difference between needle acupuncture and LA is that LA does not physically penetrate the skin. Despite a greater understanding of LA, it is unclear how non-thermal, low-intensity laser irradiation stimulates acupoints. The mechanism of LA may be entirely separate from our present understanding of acupuncture. Current theories postulate that LLLT could positively affect modulating inflammation, pain, and tissue repair, given appropriate irradiation parameters.

Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Lasers

Inflammation reduction comparable to that of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has been reported with animal studies that used red and near-infrared LLLT, with laser outputs ranging from 2.5 to 100 mW and delivered energy doses ranging from 0.6 to 9.6 Joules. Human studies have shown similar anti-inflammatory effects with LLLT, which may account for many associated positive clinical results.

Cellular Effects of LLLT

LLLT improves cell physiology by increasing the overall cell redox potential toward greater oxidation and increased reactive oxygen species while simultaneously decreasing reactive nitrogen species. These redox state changes activate numerous intracellular-signaling pathways, including nucleic acid synthesis, protein synthesis, enzyme activation, and cell cycle progression.17 LLLT also alters the expression of genes that can enhance cell growth and inhibit cell apoptosis.16 These cellular effects of LLLT might reflect its ability to induce long-term changes in cells and LLLT’s benefits for wound healing, nerve regeneration, and inflammation reduction.

LLLT Characteristics

Red and infrared laser wavelengths are absorbed by cytochrome C oxidase protein in the mitochondrial cell membranes. This absorption is associated with increased adenosine triphosphate production by the mitochondria, which. In turn, it increases intracellular calcium (Ca2+) and cyclic adenosine monophosphate, which serve as secondary messengers that aid in regulating multiple body processes, including signal transfer in nerves and gene expression.

The power density of a laser, defined as laser energy supplied per area (W/cm2), influences its energy penetration depth. A 50-mW laser with a beam size of 1 cm2 has an energy density of 0.05 W/cm2. In contrast, the same power laser with a beam size of 1 mm2 has an energy density of 5 W/cm2 — a higher energy density results in deeper energy penetration through the skin.

Energy transmission through the skin is also affected by the absorption of light energy by skin structures. Light wavelengths from 650 to 900 nm have the best penetration through the skin. Lower wavelengths are absorbed by melanin and hemoglobin, and wavelengths longer than 900 nm are absorbed by water. With a well-focused laser beam, red wavelengths (~ 648 nm) can penetrate 2–4 cm beneath the skin surface, and infrared wavelengths (~ 810 nm) can penetrate up to 6 cm.

Now Kaiyan has made LLLT easier to use. Kaiyan medical devices can treat multiple acupoints simultaneously at the same time.


Light Therapy - Stimulating Healing and Improving Bone Health

Light Therapy - Stimulating Healing and Improving Bone Health

The body is naturally designed and made to be able to build newer bones when the need arises. Studies on animals and humans have shown that red and infrared light therapy greatly aids in healing breaks, fractures, and bone defects. In 2013, researchers in Sao Paulo, Brazil, studied the effects of red and near-infrared light on rat bones' bones' healing process. Upon a piece of bone being sliced from the upper leg in an “osteotomy” of 45 rats, the rats were split into three groups — Group 1 Received no light, the second group were administered red light (about 660–690 nm), and the third group was placed on exposure to near-infrared light (about 790- 830nm)

The study found “a significant increase in the degree of gray level (mineralization) in groups treated with the laser after 7 days” and “after 14 days, only the group treated with the laser therapy (red light and near-infrared light) in the infrared spectrum showed higher bone density.

Red light and near-infrared light have been shown to stimulate energy production in the bone cells, improve blood vessel formation, circulation, and blood flow to the affected area, regulate and decrease inflammation, increase bone growth factors, enhance the production of collagen and procollagen, which stimulates the growth of bone cells.

Because ATP production is interrupted in broken bones, and cells begin to die due to a lack of energy, the right kind of red light and near-infrared light therapy has shown increased bone formation and collagen deposition. It’s no wonder red light, and NIR is gaining so much momentum in sports teams among athletes. Many pro teams now use light therapy to speed recovery and get their players back in action after an injury, more every year. Red and near-infrared light wavelengths can penetrate deep into tissue and bone for all kinds of healing effects. Concentrated natural light stimulates the mitochondria in the cells, reducing oxidative stress and helping the body to produce more usable energy to power itself, regenerate, and heal.

Bone Density Benefits
  • Increases bone mineral density and bone structure: Preliminary research shows benefits for improving osteoporosis, including a boost in osteogenesis, increased stress load, and preserved vertebrae strength
  • Strengthens bones: Increases osteoblast proliferation, collagen deposition, and 3 bone neoformation when compared to bones not treated with red light, and increases maximum bone tolerance
  • Improves bone healing: Accelerates bone healing in extraction sites, bone fracture defects and distraction osteogenesis 5
  • Reduces swelling from bone injuries: A proven anti-inflammatory treatment indicated by the FDA that has been shown to curb swelling in facial bone fractures
  • Enhances overall bone health: Increases natural collagen production, which is essential to healthy bones and skin7
References
  1. Lasers Surg Med. 2010 Aug;42(6):519-26 - PubMed
  2. J Biol Chem. 2002 Apr 19;277(16):14221-6 - PubMed
  3. Lasers Surg Med. 2006 Jan;38(1):74-83 - PubMed
  4. Bone. 1988;9(2):73-9 - PubMed
  5. Nature. 2003 May 15;423(6937):337-42 - PubMed

Could Red Light Therapy be the Cure for Low Libido?

Could Red Light Therapy be the Cure for Low Libido?

We’re animals of habit. When it comes to intimacy, it’s a night-time activity. Published findings on The Daily Mail discovered that most people have sex between 9:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. But what most people don’t realize is that for improved sex, you need the light.

Low libido (sex drive) has been a physical issue for both men and women. In the United States, sexual dysfunction affects 43% of women and 31% of men alone. However, further studies have shown this is a global issue. A study with 5,255 male participants from Croatia, Norway, and Portugal found that 14.4% reported a lack of sexual desire lasting two months or longer.

It’s clear low libido isn’t an issue within one gender; it’s a health concern that both men and women grapple with. For women, one survey at Hackensack University Medical Center, New Jersey, found that 36% of women between 18-to-3-years-old and 65% of women between 46-to-54-years-old reported low sexual desire.

But why are we losing our libido?

A loss of libido is a common issue linked to both the physical and the psychological self. Physical issues linked to low libido include low testosterone, alcohol and drug use, medication, and too little or too much exercise. At the same time, psychological issues can include stress, mental health, depression, and relationship issues.

Where do many of these problems stem from? Well, it certainly doesn’t help that we’re living our lives in overdrive: we’re working more; we’re chronically stressed, and generally living in ways that aren’t natural to our species.

However, where we live also plays a crucial role. Andrea Fagiolini, M.D., said, “In the Northern hemisphere, the body’s testosterone production naturally declines from November through April, and then rises steadily through the spring and summer with a peak in October. You see the effect of this in reproductive rates, with June showing the highest rate of conception.”

Since our body’s testosterone production naturally declines during winter and spring, many people are looking for treatment. As a result, many opt for hormone replacement therapy. It’s a controversial treatment that comes with a heavy dose of side effects, including prostate or breast cancer, sleep apnea, liver toxicity, and cardiovascular events.

Are people supposed to adjust to living with a low libido if they don’t want to undergo a dangerous treatment? Of course not. Luckily, red light therapy has been proven through various clinical studies to improve low libido levels.

At the University of Siena, Italy, scientists tested sexual and psychological responses to bright light. They discovered that regular, early-morning use of light therapy increases testosterone levels and sexual satisfaction.

So how does red light therapy increase testosterone in the body, exactly?

When your body is exposed to bright light, it produces a chemical called luteinizing hormone (LH). The more LH produced in the body leads to a higher testosterone increase, said the lead researcher Andrea Fagionlini, M.D.

Other studies in animals suggested that red light therapy influences Leydig cells — the body’s sperm producers located in the testicles.

“We found fairly significant differences between those who received the active light treatment and the controls,” Fagiolini stated. Dr. Brad Anawalt, an endocrinologist and professor of medicine at the University of Washington in Seattle provides two possible explanations for red light therapy’s effect on testosterone.

Since testosterone levels are the highest in the morning, a lack of daylight can reduce morning levels. Dr. Anawalt said, “[So] exposure to bright light might raise testosterone concentrations, leading to improved libido.” He added that “many men, and women, with low libido, suffer from depression. The bright light that mimics sunshine may help alleviate depression. Improved mood results in improved sex drive.”

Red light therapy can increase testosterone levels and reduce some of the causes of low libidos, such as depression, anxiety, and overall fatigue.

Lunas red light therapy panels have many benefits — even on our sex and love lives — which is an integral component to our well-being.

How Red Light Therapy Combats Arthritis Pain & Stiffness

How Red Light Therapy Combats Arthritis Pain & Stiffness

When it comes to muscle and joint stiffness, osteoarthritis, and arthritis, the one thing in common is pain and inflammation. When suffering from joint and muscular conditions, a person’s range of motion decreases, and swelling and skin redness increase, making everyday tasks a struggle.

Many young to middle-aged people are unaware of these conditions as they’ve been labeled as conditions mainly for the elderly; however, things have changed.

Though these conditions are common within the elderly community, we’re seeing an increase among young adults. In the United States alone, 23% of adults — over 53 million people — have arthritis, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In other words, joint pain isn’t just for old age, as we once thought.

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) appears in every 8 in 100,000 people between 18 and 34 years old. Of course, no one — young or old — wants to wake up feeling joint stiffness, swelling, or pain every morning.

However, the old myth that arthritis is untreatable is about to be debunked with light therapy.

Naturally, a medical professional will have to make a conclusive arthritis diagnosis. However, once diagnosed, many people find home treatments to deal with the pain — like light therapy. And the people who are undergoing light therapy are receiving incredible pain relief from their treatment. For example, a study published in the Turkish Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation found that infrared light treatment on inflammatory arthritis of the spine (spondylitis) encouraged increased function and improved quality of life for participants.

But what’s the science behind red light therapy treating joint conditions? Red light therapy uses low levels of red light to stimulate a natural response to cell performance. The light penetrates through the layers of the dermis, entering the muscles and nerves. As the cells absorb the energy, they become more active, with increased blood flow to the treated area, promoting cell regrowth and regeneration. Through this combination of increased blood flow and cellular activity, it rapidly reduces inflammation and pain.

With the recent advancements in modern technology, those who have arthritis or other joint conditions no longer need to opt for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or corticosteroids. These forms of the medication come with serious side effects such as edema, heartburn, stomach ulcers, cataracts, bone loss, and elevated blood clots. This alternative non-invasive treatment allows people to choose a drug-free treatment that reduces swelling, inflammation, and pain through red light therapy.

A study published in the National Library of Medicine found that elderly patients who underwent red and infrared therapy treatment had reduced their pain by 50%. Besides, they found participants who underwent red and infrared light therapy had a significant improvement in function. Another study from 2016 saw a substantial reduction in pain and an increased range of motion after five to seven red light therapy treatments for Bouchard’s and Heberden’s osteoarthritis. These studies are only a few examples of how red light therapy shows results as an effective treatment.

A little red light can go a long way for your body, mind, and soul. More and more people recognize the benefits of red light therapy as a natural home treatment. For people suffering from any joint condition, red light therapy will reduce inflammation, eliminating joint and muscle pain.

But there’s more to red light therapy than this. It’s important to be reminded that light therapy also heals other ailments in the body. Red light therapy is effective for injuries, muscle recovery, cancer side effects, skincare, and depression.

With an FDA-approved and MDA-certified Lunas red light therapy device, users can achieve optimal therapeutic results by merely exposing their bare skin to the light for a few minutes per day. Healing yourself doesn’t need a lot of time or money; you need the right tools. Lunas light therapy devices have the power to heal bodies and minds all around the world.

Stroke Incidents & Red Light Therapy

Stroke Incidents & Red Light Therapy

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 800,000 stroke incidents occur every year. No two-stroke incidents are the same. Stroke patients suffer complications such as loss of motor skills or partial paralysis on one side of the body.

A person can feel excruciating muscle pain, contractions for long periods of time, or spasms during the recovery process. This muscle tightness is known as spasticity or hypertonia. Sometimes patients experience muscle weakness down one side of the body, known as hemiparesis. One of the best treatments for muscle spasticity and strengthening muscle function is physical therapy.

The recovery process is dependent on the continued movement of the affected muscles. For example, some patients are known to keep their affected shoulder tense due to pain from the arm remaining relaxed and hanging. This leads to more complications, pain, and tightness. Everyday tasks such as lifting a fork, sweeping a floor, or driving a car can feel impossible for some. While pain is felt in the shoulder, arm, or leg muscles — these muscles are mostly healthy. It is the brain circuits and nerves between the brain's connection to these body parts that are damaged and need to be strengthened. Often, stroke patients do not find relief from even the strongest pain medication. Regardless, stimulating the muscles and pained areas with physical therapy strengthens the brain's connection and generates the healing process.

The National Library of Medicine has shared a study conducted in 2016 on stroke patients and red light therapy. The study concluded that red light therapy “may contribute to increased recruitment of muscle fibers and, hence, to increase the onset time of the spastic muscle fatigue, reducing pain intensity in stroke patients with spasticity, as has been observed in healthy subjects and athletes.” Another study from The National Library of Medicine on the effect of Photobiomodulation by red light-emitting diodes (LEDs) on nerve regeneration concluded with positive results. It was found in 2010 that “red to near-infrared LEDs have been shown to promote mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. In this study, LED irradiation improved nerve regeneration and increased antioxidation levels in the chamber fluid. Therefore, we propose that antioxidation induced by LEDs may be conducive to nerve regeneration.” Red light therapy works well to stimulate mitochondrial functions in cells and nerves. It can stimulate recovery 4 to 10 times faster than your body’s natural healing process.

Physical therapy is necessary for stroke patients, and when paired with full-body red light therapy, there is the potential to assist efforts towards pain reduction significantly. Photobiomodulation or red light therapy stimulates cells and helps repair the myelin sheath covering nerve fibers to accelerate their healing process and can have a positive effect on repairing broken neural pathways in the brain disrupted by stroke incidents.

In Kaiyan Medical, we develop all types of light therapy devices. We believe in the holistic approach to balance your body.

References

https://www.stroke.org.uk/sites/default/files/pain_after_stroke.pdf

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27299571/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20358337/#:~:text=Red%20to%20near%2Dinfrared%20LEDs,be%20conducive%20to%20nerve%20regeneration.

Hyperbaric Chambers  - Oxygen Therapy

Hyperbaric Chambers - Oxygen Therapy

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy involves breathing pure oxygen in a pressurized environment. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is a well-established treatment for decompression sickness, potential risk of scuba diving. Other conditions treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy include serious infections, bubbles of air in your blood vessels, and wounds that may not heal due to diabetes or radiation injury.

In a hyperbaric oxygen therapy chamber, the air pressure is increased two to three times higher than normal air pressure. Under these conditions, your lungs can gather much more oxygen than would be possible breathing pure oxygen at normal air pressure.

When your blood carries this extra oxygen throughout your body, this helps fight bacteria and stimulate the release of substances called growth factors and stem cells, which promote healing.

Your body’s tissues need an adequate supply of oxygen to function. When tissue is injured, it requires even more oxygen to survive. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy increases the amount of oxygen your blood can carry. With repeated scheduled treatments, the temporary extra high oxygen levels encourage normal tissue oxygen levels, even after the therapy is completed.

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is used to treat several medical conditions. And medical institutions use it in different ways. Your doctor may suggest hyperbaric oxygen therapy if you have one of the following conditions:

  • Severe anemia
  • Brain abscess
  • Bubbles of air in your blood vessels (arterial gas embolism)
  • Burns
  • Carbon monoxide poisoning
  • Crushing injury
  • Deafness, sudden
  • Decompression sickness
  • Gangrene
  • Infection of skin or bone that causes tissue death
  • Non-healing wounds, such as a diabetic foot ulcer
  • Radiation injury
  • Skin graft or skin flap at risk of tissue death
  • Traumatic brain injury
  • Vision loss, sudden and painless
Risks

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is generally a safe procedure. Complications are rare. But this treatment does carry some risk.

Potential risks include:

  • Middle ear injuries, including leaking fluid and eardrum rupture, due to changes in air pressure
  • Temporary nearsightedness (myopia) caused by temporary eye lens changes
  • Lung collapse caused by air pressure changes (barotrauma)
  • Seizures as a result of too much oxygen (oxygen toxicity) in your central nervous system
  • Lowered blood sugar in people who have diabetes treated with insulin
  • In certain circumstances, fire — due to the oxygen-rich environment of the treatment chamber.
How to Prepare

You’ll be provided with a hospital-approved gown or scrubs to wear in place of regular clothing during the procedure.

For your safety, items such as lighters or battery-powered devices that generate heat are not allowed into the hyperbaric chamber. You may also need to remove hair and skin care products that are petroleum-based, as they are a potential fire hazard. Your health care team will provide instruction on preparing you to undergo hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

During Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is typically performed as an outpatient procedure but can also be provided while hospitalized.

In general, there are two types of hyperbaric oxygen chambers:

  • A unit designed for 1 person. In an individual (monoplace) unit, you lie down on a table that slides into a clear plastic chamber.
  • A room designed to accommodate several people. In a multi-person hyperbaric oxygen room — which usually looks like a large hospital room — you may sit or lie down. You may receive oxygen through a mask over your face or a lightweight, clear hood placed over your head.

Whether you’re in an individual or multi-person environment for hyperbaric oxygen therapy, the benefits are the same.

During therapy, the room's air pressure is about two to three times the normal air pressure. The increased air pressure will create a temporary feeling of fullness in your ears — similar to what you might feel in an airplane or at a high elevation. You can relieve that feeling by yawning or swallowing.

For most conditions, hyperbaric oxygen therapy lasts approximately two hours. Members of your health care team will monitor you and the therapy unit throughout your treatment.

After Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

Your therapy team assesses you, including looking in your ears and taking your blood pressure and pulse. If you have diabetes, your blood glucose is checked. Once the team decides you are ready, you can get dressed and leave.

You may feel somewhat tired or hungry following your treatment. This doesn’t limit normal activities.

Conclusions

To benefit from hyperbaric oxygen therapy, you’ll likely need more than one session. The number of sessions is dependent upon your medical condition. Some conditions, such as carbon monoxide poisoning, might be treated in three visits. Others, such as non-healing wounds, may require 40 treatments or more.

To effectively treat approved medical conditions, hyperbaric oxygen therapy is usually part of a comprehensive treatment plan provided with other therapies and drugs designed to fit your individual needs.

The Frozen Healer - Cryotherapy

The Frozen Healer - Cryotherapy

Cryotherapy is a trend with a cult following in the recovery, wellness, and beauty industries. It can be used in combination with light therapy for better results. You may have heard people talking about it or seen celebrities or athletes posting themselves coming out of icy cold chambers on social media, but what is Cryotherapy? Why is everyone talking about it?

In its most basic form, Cryotherapy is simply the use of cold temperatures to heal the body. Using the cold to help our bodies recover from injury, inflammation, soreness, or relaxation has been used since the beginning. Putting ice on a wound or bruise, jumping in a cold lake, or taking an ice bath are basic cryotherapy forms. These methods cause stagnant blood to start moving again, promoting new blood flow, which brings healing. It is a fundamental, well-understood principle that has been widely accepted and used as a means of after the fact recovery but can be quite uncomfortable, inconvenient, and extremely inefficient compared to modern-day cryotherapy through the use of cryotherapy chambers.

Day by day

Modern-day cryotherapy lends from past cold modalities to provide a much more comfortable, convenient, and effective recovery through cryotherapy chambers. Cryotherapy chambers provide a quick, 2–3 minute private session of whole-body exposure to shallow temperatures in a dry, contained, breathable air environment. Add in some music, light therapy, and awesome fog from the cold, and it becomes a fun experience that completely distracts from how cold you just got!

The goal of true whole body cryotherapy is to expose as much skin as possible to temperatures of -166F or below for a short period of time (2–3 minutes) to create a drop in the external skin temperature of 30–40 degrees. The best way to measure this is to use an infrared temperature device before and after the session on the upper arm's back, measuring the two temperature readings' delta.

Effects of Cryotherapy

Blood rushing to the core is our body’s natural way of protecting our core organs from extreme cold. When exposed to freezing temperatures, blood rushes from our extremities to our core, creating a systemic response throughout the body that produces many benefits. Cold promotes increased blood flow, bringing fresh, oxygenated blood full of white blood cells to the body's areas that need it. Cryotherapy amplifies these positive effects and adds many more incredible benefits by activating the vagus nerve and causing vasoconstriction and vasodilation. The vagus nerve is responsible for the regulation of internal organ functions [NCBI]. The vagus nerve is activated by cold on the back of the neck and touches every major organ in the body.

Whole Body Cryotherapy is not just for extreme athletes or those with present injuries, either. The best practice is for healthy, normal adults (minors with doctors) to regularly practice whole body cryotherapy 3–5 times per week. It is important to maintain a constant cryotherapy regimen and not just use it when you feel you need it or are injured. It is a continual recovery modality that helps the body stay healthy and even resist injuries and illness.

Light to Manage Neuropathic Pain

Light to Manage Neuropathic Pain

Imagine that the movement of a single hair on your arm causes severe pain. For patients with neuropathic pain — a chronic illness affecting 7 to 8% of the European population, with no effective treatment — this can be a daily reality.

Scientists from EMBL Rome have now identified a special population of nerve cells in the skin that are responsible for sensitivity to gentle touch. These are also the cells that cause severe pain in patients with neuropathic pain. The research team, led by EMBL group leader Paul Heppenstall, developed a light-sensitive chemical that selectively binds to this nerve cell type. By first injecting the affected skin area with the chemical and then illuminating it with near-infrared light, the targeted nerve cells retract from the skin’s surface, leading to pain relief. Nature Communications publishes the results on 24 April 2018.

The Spicy Effect

By clipping off the nerve endings with light, the gentle touch that can cause severe pain in neuropathic patients is no longer felt. “It’s like eating a strong pepper, which burns the nerve endings in your mouth and desensitizes them for some time,” says Heppenstall. “The nice thing about our technique is that we can specifically target the small subgroup of neurons, causing neuropathic pain.”

There are many different nerve cells in your skin, which make you feel specific sensations like vibration, cold, heat, or normal pain. These cells are not affected by the light treatment at all. The skin is only desensitized to the gentlest touch, like a breeze, tickling, or an insect crawling across your skin.

Illumination vs. Drugs

Previous attempts to develop drugs to treat neuropathic pain have mostly focused on targeting single molecules. “We think, however, that there’s not one single molecule responsible. There are many,” Heppenstall explains. “You might be able to succeed in blocking one or a couple, but others would take over the same function eventually. With our new illumination method, we avoid this problem altogether.”

Touch and pain were assessed by measuring reflexes in mice affected by neuropathic pain in their limbs. Affected mice will normally quickly withdraw their paw when it is gently touched. After the light therapy, however, they exhibited normal reflexes upon gentle touch. The therapy's effect lasts for a few weeks, after which the nerve endings grow back, and gentle touch causes pain again.

The team also investigated human skin tissue. The tissue's overall makeup and the specifics of the neurons of interest appear to be similar, indicating that the method might be effective in managing neuropathic pain in humans. “In the end, we aim to solve the problem of pain in both humans and animals,” says Heppenstall. “Of course, a lot of work needs to be done before we can do a similar study in people with neuropathic pain. That’s why we’re now actively looking for partners and are open for new collaborations to develop this method further, with the hope of one day using it in the clinic.”

How Light Ignites an Internal Fire - Lack of Exposure to Light may Increase Metabolic Syndrome Risk

How Light Ignites an Internal Fire - Lack of Exposure to Light may Increase Metabolic Syndrome Risk

Yes, fat cells deep under your skin can sense light. And when bodies do not get enough exposure to the right kinds of light, fat cells behave differently.

This discovery, published Jan. 21, 2020, in the journal Cell Reports, was uncovered by scientists at Cincinnati Children’s who were studying how mice control their body temperature. What they found has implications far beyond describing how mice stay warm.

The study shows that light exposure regulates how two kinds of fat cells work together to produce the raw materials that all other cells use for energy. The study authors say that disruptions to this fundamental metabolic process appear to reflect an unhealthy aspect of modern life — spending too much time indoors.

Our bodies evolved over the years under the sun’s light, including developing light-sensing genes called opsins. But now we live so much of our days under artificial light, which does not provide the full spectrum of light we all get from the sun.”

Richard Lang, PhD, developmental biologist and senior author of the study.

Lang directs the Visual Systems Group at Cincinnati Children’s and has authored or co-authored more than 120 research papers, including many related to eye development and how light interacts with cells beyond the eye.

“This paper represents a significant change in the way we view the effects of light on our bodies,” Lang says.

Shining New Light on the Role of Light

Many people understand that certain wavelengths of light can be harmful, such as gamma radiation from a nuclear bomb or too much ultraviolet light from the sun burning our skin. This study from Lang and colleagues describes a different, healthy role for light exposure.

Despite the fur of a mouse or a person's clothing, light does get inside our bodies. Photons — the fundamental particles of light — may slow down and scatter around once they pass the outer layers of skin, Lang says. But they really do get in, and when they do, they affect how cells behave.

In this direction, Lang’s work dates back to 2013 when he led a study published in Nature, which demonstrated how light exposure affected fetal mice's eye development. More recently, in 2019, Lang and colleagues published two more papers, one in April in Nature Cell Biology that reported possible benefits of light therapy for eye development in preterm infants, and another study in October in Current Biology that details how light receptors in the skin help mice regulate their internal clocks.

The new study in Cell Reports includes important contributions from Russell Van Gelder, MD, Ph.D., and Ethan Buhr, Ph.D., from the University of Washington, Randy Seeley, Ph.D., University of Michigan.

“This idea of light penetration into deep tissue is very new, even to many of my scientific colleagues,” Lang says. “But we and others have been finding opsins located in a variety of tissue types. This is still just the beginning of this work.”
How Light Ignites an Internal Fire

In the latest findings, the research team studied how mice respond when exposed to chilly temperatures — about 40° F. They already knew that mice, much like humans, use both a shivering response and an internal fat-burning response to heat themselves.

Deeper analysis revealed that the internal heating process is compromised in the absence of the gene OPN3 and exposure, specifically to a 480-nanometer wavelength of blue light. This wavelength is a natural part of sunlight but occurs only at low levels in most artificial light.

When light exposure occurs, OPN3 prompts white fat cells to release fatty acids into the bloodstream. Various types of cells can use these fatty acids as energy to fuel their activities. But brown fat literally burns the fatty acids (in a process called oxidation) to generate heat that warms up the chilly mice.

When mice were bred to lack the OPN3 gene, they failed to warm up other mice when placed in chilly conditions. But surprisingly, even mice with the correct gene failed to warm up when exposed to light that lacked the blue wavelength.

This data prompted the team to conclude that sunlight is required for normal energy metabolism. At least in mice. While the scientists strongly suspect that a similar light-dependent metabolic pathway exists in humans, they need to complete another series of experiments to prove it.

“If the light-OPN3 adipocyte pathway exists in humans, there are potentially broad implications for human health,” the study states. “Our modern lifestyle subjects us to unnatural lighting spectra, exposure to light at night, shift work, and jet lag, all of which result in metabolic disruption. Based on the current findings, insufficient stimulation of the light-OPN3 adipocyte pathway may be part of an explanation for the prevalence of metabolic deregulation in industrialized nations where unnatural lighting has become the norm.”

What’s Next?

It likely will require several years of study to flesh out this discovery. Someday, in theory, “light therapy” could become a method for preventing metabolic syndrome from developing into diabetes. Replacing indoor lights with better, full-spectrum lighting systems also could improve public health, Lang says.

However, more study is needed to pin down the potential therapeutic value of light therapy. Questions to answer include determining how much sunlight is needed to support a healthy metabolism and whether people battling obesity might lack a functional OPN3 gene in their fat cells. Also unknown: when would light therapy matter most: for pregnant mothers? For infants and children? Or for fully developed adults?

Source:

Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center

Journal reference:

Opsin 3-Dependent Adipocyte Light Sensing enhances Nayak, G., et al. (2020) Adaptive Thermogenesis in Mice. Cell Reports. doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2019.12.043.

Half a Trillion-Dollar Market  —  Men.

Half a Trillion-Dollar Market  —  Men.

There’s an emerging disruptor in the beauty industry as companies target a different consumer type to expand the half a trillion-dollar market — men.

Across the globe, men’s adoption of beauty use is already starting to take off. But the trend comes in many different shapes and forms. For beauty companies struggling to find new avenues of growth, it’s a huge opportunity to see whether men are looking for traditional grooming products, discreet moisturizers, beauty balms, or popular light therapy.

According to Allied Market Research, the men’s personal care industry is predicted to hit $166 billion by 2022. According to market researcher NPD Group, just last year, men’s skin-care products alone saw a more than 7% jump in sales and with the category currently valued at $122 million.

“In recent years, the notion that men can’t or shouldn’t be using skin-care products or caring more in general about all aspects of their appearance has been receding,”

Said Andrew Stablein, a research analyst at Euromonitor International, in a research note.

The success of digitally native brands catered directly to men such as Harry’s and popular subscription service Dollar Shave Club reveal

“the average men’s grooming routine isn’t about just shaving, but can be aided by using skin-care products,”

Stablein said.

Even high-end designers like Chanel have jumped on the trend, launching its first made-for-men skincare and cosmetics line known as “Boy De Chanel” last September.

“It seems that mass players are trying to expand their market and gain share in a slowing market by growing their user base,”

Said Alison Gaither, beauty and personal care analyst at Mintel.

This includes tutorials from U.K. makeup artist Charlotte Tilbury and Rihanna’s Fenty brand, which have both put out instructions for guys who want to use makeup subtly for a more groomed appearance.

According to Coresight Research, the Asia Pacific market is now one of the fastest-growing regions for men’s grooming and cosmetic product use. Jason Chen, general manager for Chinese online retail site Tmall, told Coresight that “supply cannot meet the demand for male make-up products across China.”

However, recent data suggests the new generation of beauty consumers prefer a non-binary approach altogether. According to NPD’s iGen Beauty Consumer report, nearly 40% of adults aged 18–22 have shown interest in gender-neutral beauty products and holistic products.

“There are so many … [people] growing up with the idea that you’re not tied to the gender you’re born with,”

Said Larissa Jensen, a beauty industry analyst at NPD.

“Beauty is no longer what you’re putting out as ‘ideal beauty.’ Beauty can be anything, anyone, and any gender.”

In 2016, shortly after Coty acquired CoverGirl, the brand made history with its first-ever “CoverBoy” featuring popular YouTube makeup artist James Charles.

Charles recently found himself in a very public spat with Tati Westbrook, another YouTube beauty vlogger. Coverage of the feud, which began after Charles backed a vitamin brand that was a rival to Westbrook’s own, has been widespread and shows the influence these internet personalities have and how the business has evolved over the past two years.

While Charles may be having his struggles now, as he has lost millions of subscribers, the attention he originally received from CoverGirl sparked similar collaborations by major brands including L’Oreal, who featured beauty blogger Manny Gutierrez, known under the moniker Manny MUA, as the face of its Maybelline Colossal mascara campaign in 2017.

“I think a lot of people misconstrue a man wearing makeup as someone that is transgender or someone that wants to be a drag queen, but it’s not that,”

Guitterez, founder and CEO of Lunar beauty told CNBC.

“I think right now people are still intimidated by the aspect of it.”

Gutierrez’s makeup tutorials and product reviews have attracted nearly 5 million subscribers to his YouTube page. According to a note by the NPD Group, one setting powder product saw a 40% surge in sales after Gutierrez promoted it on his YouTube channel.

“It’s all about inclusivity and encouraging people to be a little more inclusive with both men and women,”

Said Gutierrez.

“I think that as time progresses and you see more men in beauty, it’ll get a little bit better and better.”



Animal Wellness: Red Light Therapy for Dogs

Animal Wellness: Red Light Therapy for Dogs

Certified pup parents know pets could easily sense when we’re feeling sad, happy, scared, or sick. Our furry friends could probably read us better than we could read them. However, active pets are also prone to injuries, cuts, wounds, inflammation, and infections like human beings.

If you’re a pet owner, you’d always want to give your pets the best care possible to make sure they are healthy and happy at all times. Thankfully, medicine has innovated well enough to find more advanced treatments and maintenance tools for our canine friends. In recent years, pet owners and some veterinarians have been using safe, non-invasive, and high-tech treatments for pets and domestic animals such as Red-Light therapy.

What is Red Light Therapy?

Red light therapy has been utilized by the veterinary world to deliver similar benefits to pets, just like humans. Red light therapy is a non-invasive treatment and a form of photobiomodulation that alters animal cells' physiology.

Light therapy produces wavelengths of photons that the photoreceptors in the animal’s bodies can absorb. The light provides alteration to the animal cells that result in numerous benefits such as better blood circulation and natural cellular regeneration.

Multiple studies support the efficacy of red-light therapy to animals. A 2017 study shows how Red Light therapy promoted faster healing for dogs that underwent bone surgery. The findings were also complemented by another study that suggests near-infrared wavelengths promoted bone cell reproduction for dogs.

Red Light Treatment for Dogs?

When our pets sprain their ankles or cut their pads, their cells become damaged. As a result, their bodies need cell energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to repair damaged cells and tissues.

The photoreceptors in their body absorb red light. The light stimulates ATP production in the animal’s body that results in faster delivery of nutrients and better excretion of toxins. All of these processes are essential for the body’s healing.

Red Light also promotes better circulation as it stimulates Nitric Oxide production to help blood vessels remain flexible. Injured or damaged cells need proper blood flow for healing. Light therapy helps in the healing process by increasing blood flow to ensure enough nutrients and oxygen in the affected area.

Red light is beneficial for surface healing by helping tissues that are potent in hemoglobin. On the other hand, near-infrared light can work better on deeper wounds as it can pass through the animal’s body's deeper tissues.

Innovators like Kaiyan Medical uses the FDA-cleared Red Light Therapy pad that utilizes the combined technology of Red Light-emitting diodes that can penetrate the skin and infrared wavelengths that can heal muscles, ligaments, and tendons. Red light and near-infrared wavelengths are the ideal combination of surface and inner healing.

Aside from providing the cells with energy, the light also stimulates collagen production, which aids in repairing damaged tissues. Collagen is an essential protein that can help get rid of scars and wounds.

What are the conditions that can be addressed by Red Light Therapy?

Skin and Surface issues

  • Surface wounds
  • Hair loss
  • Eczema
  • Other Skin Conditions
  • Wounds and Cuts

Deeper surface issues

  • Arthritis
  • Soft tissue injuries
  • Ligament injuries
  • Post-surgery Inflammation
  • Pain, Inflammation, and Swelling
  • hip dysplasia
  • Tendon problems
  • Strains and sprains
  • Salivary gland problems

General Maintenance

  • Maintenance of healthy joints and Bones
  • Maintenance of healthy Cardiovascular system
  • Maintenance of healthy Digestive system
  • Healthy Vision
  • Prevention of anxiety

Light therapy can be your best therapeutic tool in boosting your pet’s overall wellbeing. As a general rule, light therapy is a safe and non-invasive option for treating minor issues and maintaining their overall health. However, if your pet is undergoing more severe health problems, it’s best to consult your veterinarian for a more conducive treatment plan. While red light therapy is not a panacea for all your dog’s health issues, it’s a low-risk and pain-free option to complement treatments and to promote overall wellness for your beloved pet.

References:

https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/islsm/13/1/13_1_73/_article/-char/ja/

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/vde.12170?deniedAccessCustomisedMessage=&userIsAuthenticated=false

https://www.thieme-connect.com/products/ejournals/abstract/10.3415/VCOT-15-12-0198

https://www.degruyter.com/view/journals/plm/1/2/article-p117.xml

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1053/jvet.1999.0292?deniedAccessCustomisedMessage=&userIsAuthenticated=false

How Does Red Light Therapy Relate with Ketogenic Diet?

How Does Red Light Therapy Relate with Ketogenic Diet?

Red light therapy is an easily accessible and affordable clinical device that boosts metabolism and increases ATP energy production. It is a non-invasive modulator of metabolism that delivers proper frequency, power, and luminance by shifting the mitochondria's function organically.

Ketogenic Diet and Red Light Therapy

A ketogenic diet involves the consumption of low-carb, high-fat meals. When practiced together with red light therapy, it can amplify your metabolic flexibility. It also helps cells burn more sugar and fat efficiently. Good levels of ATP energy production (empowered by mitochondria by converting oxygen and nutrients to ATP) can help prevent high-blood or low-blood pressure conditions. The process of creating ATP energy works best when our body and cells are well-balanced, reaching a state called homeostasis.

One thing to consider in following a diet plan is over-nutrition, which may lead to metabolic inflexibility. When over-feeding happens, the production of ATP energy may result in metabolic congestion. Red light therapy can help alleviate this metabolic congestion by focusing amplification of ATP energy levels. Insulin can mediate metabolic congestion by the fluidity between glucose, fatty acids, and amino acids. An important step for ATP energy production is forming the COX enzyme, which can aid metabolism by pairing oxygen neutralized into the water with high-energy electrons.

If the COX enzyme goes out of sync with electrons' flow, the high-energy electrons won’t effectively be neutralized into water. Red light can help regulate the healthy formation of the COX enzyme, efficiently oxidizing fat. The ketogenic diet triggers cells to insulin by stimulating ATP energy production by increasing metabolic flexibility, reducing carbon combustion, and helping clear metabolic congestion.

Significance to Healing

The chemical DHEA (dehydroepiandrosterone) plays numerous vital roles in health. It helps with the metabolism of cholesterol that produces hormones such as progesterone, estrogen, and testosterone. As we age, our levels of DHEA decreases, as well as the synthesis of such hormones. Low levels of progesterone can affect women in their peri-menopausal and post-menopausal stages. This is a function of the decline in mitochondria, which then affects ATP energy levels.

Low levels of DHEA may contribute to the insufficiency of adrenaline and estrogen dominance, which is common to middle-aged women at the peri-menopausal or post-menopausal stage. Women rely on the production of adrenaline and DHEA to keep their progesterone levels and prevent estrogen dominance.

Lower production of DHEA and progesterone can be an effect of elevated secretion of cortisol that is caused by acute/chronic stress. When high levels of stress reduce the adrenal glands' proper functions due to the decrease of synthesis of the adrenal cortex steroid hormones in the mitochondria, it results in adrenal insufficiency.

Based on health professionals' studies, when cortisol levels drop, it inhibits the synthesis and secretion of DHEA/progesterone, resulting in pathophysiological changes caused by stress. Enzyme activation and regulatory signaling can affect the fluidity dynamics between cortisol, DHEA, and other hormones such as progesterone, estrogen, and testosterone.

Red light therapy and ketogenic diet can mediate inflammatory stress and regulate the healthy production of DHEA.

Estrogen Levels

Estrogen is a master regulator of female metabolism. A youthful and regulatory expression of estrogen is the production of 17B-estradiol (E2). It modulates the menstrual cycle to ensure the healthy release of the corpus luteum, which secretes progesterone.

On the other hand, progesterone helps maintain a healthy uterus lining. When the expression of E2 is sufficient, progesterone secretion also increases. Having high progesterone levels means having lower estrogen and a lesser risk of getting diseases like breast, ovary, and colon cancer. E2 also contributes to potential partition fuel, orchestrating metabolic flexibility, and increasing energy levels that lead to optimal cerebral glucose metabolism.

The decline in the peripheral steroidogenesis of E2, progesterone, and testosterone is common as time goes by.

Testosterone Levels

A 12-week ketogenic diet may increase testosterone levels in men due to an increase in cholesterol and DHEA. Red light therapy also improves the mitochondrial synthesis of testosterone from DHEA.

For males, testosterone naturally converts to E2, but healthy testosterone levels stipulate a hormonal challenge to the synthesis of E2. An enlarged prostate can be caused by estrogen dominance when there is no testosterone/estrogen ratio balance. Having healthy testosterone levels may lead to a decline of estrogen dominance, as it is for progesterone in women.

Other Healing Benefits

Healthcare professionals strongly believe that red light therapy can be a powerful healing agent that may help prevent diabetic ulcers and lower chances of extremity amputations when practiced together with a ketogenic diet.

Diabetic ulcers usually result to lower limb amputations in the long-run. Studies show that diabetic foot ulcers and lower extremity amputations are increasing in number. In fact, having unhealed wounds can be alarming as the post-amputation survival rate for people with diabetes averages to only five years. Statistics show the urgent need to prevent, detect, and prove that treatments for lower limb ulcers should be highly considered. Red light therapy has been proven to increase the circulation of blood flow and healthier skin.

Innovation

Red light therapy and ketogenic diets are considered to be disruptive innovators in the healthcare system. Apart from the fact that red light therapy is non-invasive, such treatment shows great potential in helping lengthen the lifespan and improve people's overall health. Red light therapy also promotes a more affordable and accessible treatment that can be done in the comfort of your home.

Here at Kaiyan Medical, we offer red light therapy devices to help you achieve your health and aesthetic goals. To learn more about the brands and products we offer, please click here.

More References

https://perfectketo.com/red-light-therapy/

https://perfectketo.com/keto-diet-plan-for-beginners/

https://www.rejuvcryo.com/the-science/2019/8/14/article-the-surprising-synergy-between-keto-and-red-light-therapy-rejuvcryo-north-county-san-diego

The Benefits of Red Light Therapy in Treating Hypothyroidism

The Benefits of Red Light Therapy in Treating Hypothyroidism

Thyroid issues are a commonplace problem that affects all ages and genders. It significantly contributes to changes in mental outlook, energy levels, skin, and weight. Hypothyroidism has drawn much attention due to many cases that are left undiagnosed, untreated, or inadequately treated. As a result, it led to more serious problems such as infertility, heart disease, neurological problems, and high cholesterol and blood pressure levels. Not to mention, treatment studies for hypothyroidism have experienced a significant backlog throughout the years.

In this article, we take a look at the basic precepts of hypothyroidism and how Red light therapy plays a role in treating the thyroid problem.

What is Hypothyroidism?

Hypothyroidism is a chronic abnormality of the thyroid gland, demonstrating an inadequacy of thyroid hormones such as triiodothyronine and thyroxine (T4). Normal levels of thyroid hormones stimulate a healthy amount of mitochondrial energy production. This means that in hypothyroid cases, the thyroid inhibits a state of low cellular energy.

As a result, people who suffer from this chronic problem often feel unusual fatigue, tiredness, weight changes, and skin problems. However, symptoms can vary from person to person and may even be subtle enough to be left undiagnosed and untreated. When left untreated, the disease causes more irreversible neurological, reproductive, and cardiovascular problems. It’s also found that Hypothyroidism is found to be five to eight times more prevalent in women than in men.

What Causes Hypothyroidism?

Hypothyroidism can be caused by a wide range of diet and lifestyle issues. Some cases can be caused by a lack of iodine intake, especially in more underdeveloped parts of the world. It can also be caused by other dietary issues such as low carb intake, excess polyunsaturated fat intake, and alcoholism. Other typical causes include stress, aging, sleep deprivation, and heredity.

What is Light Therapy?

When talking about light, we often think of it as the first thing we switch on in a dark room or the bright rays that set up the mood. We don’t usually think of it as having bioactive properties, penetrating beneath our skin, affecting the way our hormones, tissues, and cells function.

In reality, our cells actually capture photons of light, just like how plants do. Light therapy, also called photobiomodulation, essentially means light (photo) changing (modulation) your biology (bio).

How Can Red Light Therapy Help Treat Hypothyroidism?

Red and near-infrared light therapy, backed by over 5,000 studies, has grown its significance in medicinal treatments throughout the years.

Red light therapy is significantly targeted for hypothyroidism because unlike other kinds of light; they have a greater penetrability beneath our skin.

In fact, a 2010 study found that 38% of patients with Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism who were given red light therapy treatments have reduced their medication dose, while 17% have been able to stop the medication completely.

Here’s how it works:

  1. It Supplies energy

Because hypothyroidism is reflective of low cellular energy in the thyroid, red and near-infrared light helps the cells work better by supplying more energy to your body.

They have a photoreceptor called cytochrome c oxidase that works by catching photos of light. Like how our food is being processed by our body for the mitochondria to stimulate energy, the photos of light also stimulate energy production in the mitochondria. The mitochondria are responsible for the energy production of our body’s cells.

  1. It Prevents Stress

Red light is also shown to prevent stress by averting nitrous oxide poisoning. This means that aside from helping the mitochondria supply more energy, red light helps the thyroid hormone by alleviating stress-related molecules' effects.

  1. It Breaks the Cycle

Hypothyroidism is a vicious cycle of having low energy availability and decreased thyroid hormone production. By stimulating energy production in the mitochondria and preventing nitrous oxide poisoning prevention, red light can potentially break the cycle responsible for hypothyroidism.

In Kaiyan Medical, we produce a medical-grade red light therapy device that is effective and non-invasive, ideal for supplementing hypothyroidism treatments. Our device has a dual optical energy technology that combines red light and infrared light therapy as an excellent spectrum for deeper penetration and absorption. You can now rise above hypothyroidism and maximize your body’s healing properties with our Red Light therapy device.

More References

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6247385/

https://drruscio.com/red-light-therapy-part-ii/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6822815/

https://www.health.harvard.edu/newsletter_article/treating-hypothyroidism


Speeding up Recovery for Athletes: Red Light Therapy Treatment

Speeding up Recovery for Athletes: Red Light Therapy Treatment

Athletes take exercise and training very seriously to maximize and improve performance. Whether you’re a competitive elite athlete or someone who’s just born to win every day, recovery can be one of the most neglected aspects of our daily lives.

Recovery: We hear it all the time from coaches and instructors, but it’s also one of the hardest things to do. The saying “Push yourself to your limits” happens also to have its own limits. Neglecting your training recovery aspect for optimal performance can take a toll on our body in the long run.

In this article, we show the importance of rest and recovery and some of the ways to speed up our body’s healing process, such as integrating red light therapy treatment.

What is Recovery?

After training or a strenuous workout, our body responds to strain, injury, or stress as a defense mechanism in inflammation. While it may sound damaging, inflammation is a natural response when our muscle tissue regenerates and grows from microtears. Going through the process is important to allow muscle growth and performance improvement. However, the inflammation needs recovery for your muscles to heal from too much strain or injury for it to maximize its healing effects.

Recovery is the process that your body undergoes to recuperate between training sessions or from the time of danger to its healing progression. Recovery works by giving your body time to regenerate muscle tissues.

Whether it’s a strain, acute soreness, or severe damage, your body needs time to heal. The time needed for the recovery process is also dependent on the severity of the damage/strain/injury. This means that the greater the stressor's intensity to your body, the longer the time you need to spend to allow your body to recover.

What are the Examples of Recovery?
  • Getting enough sleep
  • Resting
  • Cooling down
Why is Recovery Time Important?

Many athletes have made recovery time a priority as it assists in the healing process of muscles post-inflammation. Giving your body time to recover can result in an improved performance.

During the recovery time, the muscle repairs regenerate and strengthens to tolerate a higher level of strain the next time. In other words, taking time to heal makes you stronger and less susceptible to future injuries. Having enough recovery time helps in optimal performance and longevity by helping the athletes convalesce both psychologically and physically to train and perform better.

By doing this, you can prevent future chronic problems, decreased sports performance, increased risk of injuries, or fatigue caused by inadequate healing.

What are the Ways to Speed Recovery?

1. Plan Your Rest Time

Planning your rest schedule and duration involves many factors such as the intensity of your activity, your age, and your skill level in sports/pieces of training. You may need less time to recover or more, depending on your personal needs. As a general rule, for medium to intense workouts/training, it is prescribed to maintain a healthy duration of 45 hours in between training.

Pro tip: Engage in Active Recovery

If you’re not suffering from an injury or severe damage, it’s important to incorporate active recovery periods during your recovery time so your body can maintain its active state.

Proper blood circulation is important in the recovery process. When the body gets injured, the body responds by dilating blood cells to speed up blood flow. Active recovery helps maintain good blood circulation and removes lactic acid out of inflamed muscles. Active recovery activities involve light physical movements such as stretching or yoga to allow proper blood flow and help your muscles recover and adapt better.

2. Get Enough Sleep

The Human Growth Hormone (HGH) is at its peak at night as we sleep. This hormone is responsible for tissue repair and recovery. This is why the key to a speedy recovery is to make you get a good REM sleep at the right time during your recovery period. Make sure to get a minimum of 7 hours of sleep at night to ensure that your body gets enough rest that it needs and to avoid any future complications. Lack of sleep can deter the process of muscle recovery.

Pro tip: Don’t be scared of having a few extra hours

Especially when you are suffering from intense strain/injury, it’s important to sneak in a few extra hours of sleep within your recovery period. In fact, a 2018 study suggests that sleep extension, a form of sleep intervention, can significantly contribute to the success of an athlete’s recovery. One way to ensure you get a significant amount of rest is to make sure your body has a healthy circadian rhythm. If you’re worried that you’re having trouble sleeping at night, there are many ways to improve your circadian clock- including red light therapy.

3. Refuel your Body

A healthy diet is also one of the great pillars of health. The nutrients you take in play a great role in your body’s function to cooperate with the recovery process. Minimize processed foods that may contain too much salt, sweets, and alcohol. These types of food may promote inflammation and dehydration, which can hinder the recovery process. Make sure to eat a balance recommended diet of whole foods.

Have an evaluation with a licensed dietitian or nutritionist to assess your nutritional needs. Assessment may vary depending on different factors such as weight, BMI, and activity level.

Pro tip: Focus on your Protein Intake

Protein is the key macronutrient that is responsible for muscle building and repair. It has amino acids that are metabolized by your body to ease muscle inflammation and build stronger muscles. Skip gulping on those protein supplements and focus instead on taking protein from whole foods such as lean meat, eggs, and cheese.

4. Listen to your Body

There can be all kinds of rules in recovery to maximize healing, but you can’t go wrong with paying attention to your body’s signals. Often, your body’s responses can be neglected. However, overlooking these signals can result in overtraining, which puts your body at risk of having more problems in the long run.

Despite your recovery time or period, if your body signals indicate pain and soreness, it’s important to give it time to recover better to address the issue. Aside from obvious physiological signs, pay attention to your heart rate variability, indicating your body’s adaptability to stress and your overall cardiovascular fitness.

5. Incorporate Red Light Therapy

Thanks to innovative medical devices, athletes and trainers have utilized more advanced healing modalities like red light therapy. Red Light Therapy is a popular, non-invasive, and effective light therapy treatment that can improve blood circulation essential for tissue and muscle recovery. It works by using LED to deliver wavelengths that deeply penetrates the skin and cells.

Integrating red light therapy in your recovery process can speed up muscle repair and minimize pain and swelling. The therapy accelerates the healing process by enhancing macrophage activity responsible for the white blood cell’s healing and anti-inflammatory response.

Pro tip: Try using Light Therapy Body Pad

Kaiyan Medical’s Light Therapy Body pad utilizes a high-end, medical-grade dual optical energy pad that uses 30 pieces of red light and 30 pieces of infrared light. The therapy's duality promotes deep treatment by treating injured skin surface while repairing deeper muscle, bones, tissue, and joint damage. The therapy pad is specially made with a broader light spectrum to increase absorption and penetration so you can maximize the treatment’s benefits. It’s a safe, non-invasive treatment that you can add to your recovery process so you can get back in the game stronger than ever.

Recovery and Rest are just as important as optimizing and improving performance. Allowing your body to maximize its natural healing processes can improve performance and overall better physical and mental health.

More References

Ratamess NA, Alvar BA, Kibler WB, Kraemer WJ, Triplett NT. American College of Sports Medicine position stand. Progression models in resistance training for healthy adults. Med Sci Sports Exerc 2009.

Garber CE, Blissmer B, Deschenes MR et al. American College of Sports Medicine position stand. Quantity and quality of exercise for developing and maintaining cardiorespiratory, musculoskeletal, and neuromotor fitness in apparently healthy adults: guidance for prescribing exercise. Med Sci Sports Exerc 2011.

Michael Kellmann, Maurizio Bertollo, et al. Recovery and Performance in Sport: Consensus Statement. Int J Sports Physiol Perform. 2018 Feb 1.

So-Ichiro Fukada, Takayuki Akimoto, Athanasia Sotiropoulos. Role of damage and management in muscle hypertrophy: Different muscle stem cells' behaviors in regeneration and hypertrophy. Biochim Biophys Acta Mol Cell Res. 2020 Sep.

Daniel J Plews, Paul B Laursen, et al. Training adaptation and heart rate variability in elite endurance athletes: opening the door to effective monitoring. Sports Med. 2013 Sep.

Michael R. Irwin, Richard Olmstead, Judith E. Carroll. Sleep Disturbance, Sleep Duration, and Inflammation: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies and Experimental Sleep Deprivation. Biol Psychiatry. 2016 Jul 1; 80(1): 40–52.

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/247927

https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/heart-rate-variability-new-way-track-well-2017112212789

https://www.webmd.com/men/features/benefits-protein#1

How Saunas and Red Light Therapy are Distinct but Complementing

How Saunas and Red Light Therapy are Distinct but Complementing

Saunas and red light therapy devices are clinically-proven treatments that complement each other wonderfully, even if they depend on distinct biological mechanisms to yield various natural health and aesthetic benefits.

In this article, we’ll focus on how things work for red light therapy and the distinctions of traditional saunas, and what you can actually gain by availing of either of them.

What You Need to Know About Saunas

Saunas can make your body’s core temperature hotter by supplying sufficient heat throughout your body. It has been a part of traditional medicine for various centuries, as the old century folks realized the health benefits of sweating. Although there are multiple types of saunas, two of them are the most popular:

  1. Traditional Convection Saunas

When you think of saunas, this is the first scenario that comes to mind: hot and steamy. This type of sauna requires more energy as it delivers heat to the atmosphere, warming the air inside the sauna, and distributes heat in the body. Traditional convection saunas can maintain air temperatures between 170–200°F and are an ideal type of sauna for general use. It is important to comprehend the different temperatures required for specific health concerns since being exposed to heat more than what has required triggers a warning for unsubstantiated claims.

  1. Infrared Saunas

The latest trend in saunas is the infrared saunas. Inside, instead of warming the air, this kind of sauna heats actual objects. Such objects include those with emitting surfaces, charcoal, and carbon fiber. Infrared saunas' effectivity is directly attributed to the temperature, humidity, and length of time your body is exposed to heat, even though many saunas claim to provide “full-spectrum” infrared wavelengths.

The farther the wavelengths are in the infrared spectrum, the more they are considered efficient and effective in heat production. This will be thoroughly discussed later, but the general gist is that heat supplementation is the primary purpose of saunas, convection, and infrared.

On the other hand, near-infrared wavelengths in near-infrared saunas generate very little heat. Most of the high-quality standard saunas use more effective heats from the far-infrared spectrum or IR-C wavelengths.

What are the Health Benefits of Saunas?

Inducing thermal stress on the body is the primary function of every sauna, but what does it really mean?

One of many biological responses from sauna usage is increased heart rate as well as perspiration. The essential body processes protein metabolism and is also affected by enough heat. Heat shock proteins are a special kind of protein that responds specifically to cellular stress from heat. Heat stress induction leads to natural health benefits like those we gain doing physical activities.

One experiment had participants sat in a sauna treatment for 30 minutes at 194°F for 3 weeks, totaling 13 work sessions. The results showed that the participants improved 32% in performance tests versus those who underwent sauna treatments.

Besides improving your cardiovascular functions, using saunas can help reap benefits such as detoxication, decreased depression, and lesser chronic fatigue.

Red Light Therapy vs. Saunas

What differentiates saunas from red light therapy devices is their mechanism of action. While saunas utilize heat for biological effects, red light therapy devices supply healthy light wavelengths directly to the skin and cells. Even when producing almost no heat, red light therapy devices help with cellular function improvement and support bodily balance. Simply put, red light therapy helps energize the body with light, while saunas heat your body.

How does red light therapy work?

Mitochondria, the powerhouse of our cells, is wonderfully affected by certain wavelengths of natural light. This helps in producing energy within the cells of our body, feeding photons to our cells from natural light via red light therapy.

What about clinically-proven wavelengths?

We feel warm when exposed to sunlight and other heat sources such as fire and hot coals because most of the wavelengths, including ultraviolet (UV), are rapidly absorbed by the outer layers of the skin tissue as heat.

However, unknown to many, some wavelengths have the unique capability of boosting your cellular functions and energy. These are those few wavelengths that can penetrate human tissues more effectively, having photons power-up your “cellular batteries.”

What to Look for When Buying Red Light Therapy Devices and Saunas?

One of the first few things you need to look for in saunas is the temperature it produces. You need to consider some other factors, including the type of wood, the heating unit (Is it conventional or infrared? Is it near far or full-spectrum?), finishes and stains, price, and more.

On the other hand, some of the factors you need to consider when choosing a red light therapy device are the device’s light energy output, light color or frequency range in terms of nanometers, warranty, body or treatment coverage area, the price, and the credibility of the company provider.

Light Therapy and Saunas: Friends with Benefits

Saunas and red light therapy devices offer a wide range of natural health benefits, which surprisingly go well with each other. They both support balance and health to improve your fitness and function but do not overlap with each other’s effects because of energy supplementation in distinct forms and wavelengths. What a great combination of complementary natural therapies!

Here at Kaiyan Medical, we provide different types of red light therapy devices for various medical, wellness, and aesthetic uses. To see our list of products, click here.

References:

https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/saunas-and-your-health

https://www.healthline.com/health/fitness-exercise/are-saunas-good-for-you

Scoon GS, Hopkins WG, Mayhew S, Cotter JD. Effect of post-exercise sauna bathing on the endurance performance of competitive male runners. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport. 2007 Aug.

Crinnion WJ. Sauna as a valuable clinical tool for cardiovascular, autoimmune, toxicant- induced and other chronic health problems. Altern Med Rev. 2011 Sep.



Let’s Talk About Optimal Performance Recovery and Red Light Therapy

Let’s Talk About Optimal Performance Recovery and Red Light Therapy

Performance and recovery go hand in hand when training or doing physical activities, regardless if you’re an athlete or not. In fact, athletes and their trainers utilize light therapy to improve their performance and muscle health and optimize recovery. To expound further, this article will tackle optimizing performance in fitness, improving the recovery process, and breaking down the significance of light therapy.

Optimizing Performance and Improving Recovery

Optimizing performance means paying attention to the body and how it functions, to live and train the body, and to find the best way to support its functions. Performance is not based on how hard or heavy are the weights you lift or the number of kilometers you’ve run; it is how effective your performance is and how you match it with your lifestyle (with the way you eat, drink and sleep).

On the other hand, recovery is about the effectiveness of the body’s healing process and the conscious effort of being in your best shape by enhancing your workout. It is also about utilizing the body’s tools and functions to effectively finish the jobs required daily.

Physical Performance and Recovery

Performance and recovery are correlated to one another. In exercising or training, if you want to improve fitness, workouts should be consistent. To get stronger, faster, and bigger, certain efforts must be made to increase performance levels. The recovery process is essential in health. It contributes to the workout; it is the downtime between training sessions or a break due to an injury or a period of healing from any exhaustion experienced.

Breaks like cool-downs, rest, and ample time of sleep give your body time to recuperate. They also allow healing for the muscles and tissues affected, strained, or damaged from workouts or training.

Performance is better when recovery time from soreness or inflammation is maximized. It also helps prevent burnout, fatigue, and possible injuries. If recovery is not made right, your physical performance may not reach its optimal state. Some athletes and trainers even make a recovery a priority over training itself. They believe that when an athlete recovers better than their competition, they will train harder in the long run.

Recovery is for Everyone

Even if you are not an athlete, you should know how to let your body rest, heal, and recover properly from any form of injury or physical activity. Everyone has their own activity levels to maintain. It may not be sports-related, but everyone demands effort from their bodies on a day-to-day basis.

When Recovery is Not Prioritized…

Regardless if you are an athlete, your body has limits. And if you push too hard, the body can break down and perform worse, especially if you didn’t observe any recovery time. Overtraining and pushing the body beyond its limits can affect performance in the short term or long term. Chances of injury are higher when you don’t allow yourself to recover, and it may also affect hormonal levels and the function of the immune system. The body needs time to process inflammation or any injury.

Inflammation and the Importance of Recovery

Inflammation happens when the body responses to danger or strain. It often takes place during a strenuous workout. When exercising, inflammation may indicate muscular damage. And when a muscle is “damaged,” it means that the tissue is growing and undergoes repair to get stronger.

Experiencing inflammation is a normal part of the growth and repair of muscle tissues. However, if you won’t set aside time for recovery, your inflammation may worsen over time and lead to greater health consequences.

4 Easy Ways to Improve the Recovery Process

Here are some ways that can help you improve your body’s recovery process:

  1. Body awareness

The body speaks when it sends signals to the brain. Sometimes, we dismiss these signals because of training goals. This may eventually lead to fatigue and injury. When you experience pain or when your muscles are sore, it is important to give your body time to recuperate. You must also be aware of your heart rate, especially at rest, as it may be saying something about the state of your health.

  1. Getting enough sleep

Besides giving your body time to recuperate, deep sleep also allows the body to digest and process fat and recover from inflammation or damaged muscle tissues. It is harder for the body to recover from pain, strain, fatigue, and injury when you’re sleeping less than 7–8 hours per night. If you’re struggling with getting enough sleep, try doing meditation or speak with a doctor so he/she can advise you about developing a sleeping routine.

  1. Eating a balanced diet.

Getting the right amount of whole foods, good carbohydrates, protein, and good fat can also boost your performance and recovery. Lowering your intake of processed foods, alcohol, and sugary drinks can also help decrease inflammation.

  1. Aiming for balanced and healthy cells

The performance and recovery of our bodies depend entirely on our cells. When our cells are creating and using energy efficiently, our bodies recover faster. ATP (adenosine triphosphate) energy is released to give us power in what we do. The process of creating ATP energy works best when our body and cells are well-balanced, reaching a state called homeostasis.

Light Therapy, Performance, Healing, and Recovery

High-quality devices are now available in the market to help athletes and trainers enhance the body’s natural healing and recovery process through light therapy.

Light therapy is a non-invasive treatment that uses LED lights to deliver red and near-infrared light to the skin and cells. It promotes efficient cellular ATP energy production and helps restore the balance of cells and tissues. Light therapy can be done before or after a workout. Some even do it both times — before and after a workout, depending on their goals.

Pre-conditioning with light therapy before working out can also help strengthen muscle performance. It can limit muscle damage and strain, lessening the chances of inflammation or soreness. When used after a workout, it promotes the speedy recovery of muscles and accelerates its adaptability to exercise. It also helps the body process acute inflammation after physical activity.

The Relationship Between Light Therapy and Muscle Cells

Muscles are composed of millions of cells that need to release ATP energy to fulfill the body's jobs, balancing exercise and stress. Light therapy helps improve cellular ATP energy, glycogen synthesis, oxidative stress reduction, and protection against muscle damage from exercising. Light therapy also helps improve blood circulation and oxygen availability, which allows better healing and recovery. It helps with the overall improvement of physical performance and faster recovery times. It also helps limit fatigue from exercising and strength training.

Recover and Improve Your Performance with Light Therapy

As discussed, light therapy promotes faster healing and recovery and soothes cells under stress when doing strenuous workouts, incurring injuries, and experiencing inflammation. When you set aside time for recovery, you give your body and cells what they need to function, thus improving your overall performance.

At Kaiyan Medical, we offer high-quality light therapy devices to help you achieve and maintain your fitness and performance goals. If you have questions about our products and the brands we offer, please don’t hesitate to contact us. We will respond to you as soon as possible.

The Effect of Green & Red Light Therapy on Hearing

The Effect of Green & Red Light Therapy on Hearing

Low-level laser therapy

Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been practiced for over 20 years in Europe and has been introduced in the United States as a treatment for pain and postsurgical tissue repair. It has been proposed that laser energy in the red and near-infrared light spectrum may aid in the repair of tissue damage. A proposed mechanism for this therapeutic effect is the stimulation of mitochondria in the cells to produce more energy through the production of adenosine triphosphate.

Studies in humans have investigated the effects of LLLT on both hearing loss and tinnitus, with equivocal results. Some studies have found an improvement in hearing thresholds and tinnitus symptoms.

The Subjects

A total of 35 adult subjects were enrolled in the study. Two subjects withdrew from the study due to loss of interest and/or scheduling difficulty. The data from three additional subjects were not included in the analysis. One subject yielded unreliable audiometric and speech understanding data, speech scores could not be obtained from one subject with a profound hearing loss, and calibration problems compromised data from the third subject. Data from the remaining 30 subjects were included in the analyses. The experimental protocol was approved by the Institutional Review Board of The University of Iowa, and written informed consent was obtained from all participants.

The Device

An Erchonia EHL laser was used to provide the laser stimulation. The device was a portable unit that consisted of a hand-held probe and a main body. The probe contained two laser diodes. One diode produced light in the green part of the visible light spectrum (532 nm wavelength), and the other diode produced light in the red part of the visible light spectrum (635 nm wavelength). Both diodes produced energy levels of 7.5 mW (class IIIb). The laser beams from both diodes were dispersed through lenses to create parallel line-generated beams, rather than spots. A second Erchonia EHL device served as the placebo. It was identical to the treatment device, except that the laser diodes were replaced with nonfunctioning standard light-emitting diodes.

The Groups

The study used three groups: treatment, placebo, and control. Subjects were pseudorandomly assigned to one of the three groups.

Initial group assignment was random with occasional adjustment to ensure that the three groups were similar in terms of number of participants, female/male ratio, mean age of participants, and mean pure-tone audiometric thresholds. The treatment group received the laser treatment protocol using the functional laser device. The placebo group also received the laser treatment protocol, but using the nonfunctioning laser device. The control group made similarly timed visits to the laboratory but received no real or feigned “treatment.” The study used a repeated-measures design, with each subject taking a battery of pretests, followed by treatment followed by a battery of posttests.

Analysis

Data were obtained from both ears of each subject. Since no obvious differences were seen between left and right ears, data from both ears were combined in the following analyses. Strictly speaking, this likely violates the statistical assumption of independent sampling, since the test results from left and right ears of a single subject are likely to be highly correlated. None of the statistical tests used in the analyses are robust to the assumption of independent sampling, and the effect of including both ears is likely to be that of artificially increasing the sample size, making it more likely that a statistically significant result will be found. All statistical tests were conducted using a significance level of .

Conclusions

No statistically significant effect of LLLT on auditory function was found, as assessed by pure-tone audiometry, speech understanding, and TEOAEs in this test. Additionally, no individual subjects showed any clinically significant change. It remains possible that other methods of LLLT could have an effect on hearing. The type of device used was not the best one for this type of study. Further research elucidating the anatomic and physiologic bases for therapeutic effects of LLLT on hearing are needed before further clinical testing is warranted.

More References

Clinical Study | Open Access. Volume 2013 |Article ID 916370 | https://doi.org/10.1155/2013/916370

ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01820416)

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Healing Muscular Pain with Light Therapy

Healing Muscular Pain with Light Therapy

Light Therapy Healing Muscular Pain

When it comes to pain, we could hardly avert it! Especially the muscle pain. Given that the human body has over 600 muscles, it is tough to avoid muscle pain. Evidently, one out of three Americans is affected by muscle pain annually.

Not only this, Musculoskeletal pain affects around 116 million Americans, which results in poor productivity, missed work or school, fatigue, and lost interest in work.

But doesn’t we treatments for this chronic pain? Of course, we do have several options. Currently, therapies available consist of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, steroid injections, pain medications, and surgery. Each of these has its own specific risk profiles.

What we need now is an effective solution that is less time-consuming, low risk, safe and non-invasive, and yet cost-effective. All these features are available in treatment; we call Low Laser Light Therapy (LLLT). Light therapy has been in the medical field over the past forty years. Light therapy has been demonstrated to lessen inflammation and edema, promote healing in a range of musculoskeletal pathologies. LLLT is being accepted around the globe. This is an advanced, cost-effective, non-invasive therapy for pain that could elevate the quality of life while reducing your financial strains. The causes of muscular pain are numerous. Hence, LLLT helps people from all fields like sports, fitness, medical, and even old age.


Mechanism of LLLT

In this process, light with a wavelength in the red to the near-infrared region of the spectrum (660nm–905nm) is employed on the skin surface. The reason for using these wavelengths is that they have the ability to penetrate the skin and soft/hard tissues. From various conducted clinical trials, this treatment is proven to have a good effect on pain, inflammation, and repairing of the tissues. The therapy goes from 30 to 120 seconds or more a week, depending upon the pain's severity.

Based on the tissue condition, the therapy can go on for weeks or months. LLLT has resulted in relief and reduction of inflammation, pain relief, and accelerated tissue regeneration.

But how does the light actually work?

LLLT in the Treatment of Pain

Do you know that many acute orthopedic conditions such as strains, sprains, muscular back pain, frozen shoulder, neck and back pain, etc., are amenable to Low Laser Light Therapy (LLLT)?

The Infra-Red light relieves pain in a different section of the body and increases relaxation sensation while also comforting the muscles. LLLT has been shown to enhance the multiplication of cells like fibroblasts, keratinocytes, endothelial cells, and lymphocytes. Fibroblasts and keratinocytes are two major cell types that respond to the inflammatory phase in the repair/regeneration process.

LLLT can enhance neovascularization, promote angiogenesis, and increase collagen synthesis to succor in the healing of acute and chronic wounds. The LED light sessions have shown the ability to heal skin, nerves, tendons, cartilage, and bones. Low-intensity LLLT stimulates mitochondria and also enhances the mitochondrial membrane potential.

The peripheral nerve endings of nociceptors (also known as the pain receptors), consisting of the thinly myelinated and unmyelinated, slow-conducting C fibers, lie within the epidermis. This complex network converts harmful stimuli into action potentials. Moreover, these nerve endings lie on the surface or superficial in nature, making the LLLT wavelength penetration work easy.


Hence, with the rise of chronic pain in different countries, it is imperative to validate cost-effective and safe techniques for managing painful conditions, allowing people to live active and productive lives. Light therapy is constantly evolving in relieving muscular pain. It improves the muscle's endurance, reduces muscle soreness, joint pain, and inflammation.

It’s time to let go of the pain!!

Experience the difference with light therapy from Kaiyan Medical.

More References:

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12605431/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27472858/

https://arthritis-research.biomedcentral.com/track/pdf/10.1186/s13075-015-0882-0

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0004951414601276?via%3Dihub

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4743666/