Light Therapy: Man's Best Friend

Men: if you’re experiencing any type of noticeable physical change, your body could be telling you something is wrong. It’s nothing to be ashamed of; not everyone is at their best 100% of the time. Sometimes we need to take a step back and realize we have to take some time out of our busy schedules to regenerate our body and energy. 

Men deal with many types of issues; however, when it comes to health, many tend to ignore it until it’s absolutely necessary. While we push our health to the side, we forget small changes are our body’s way of telling us something’s wrong. 

Hair loss, the decline in libido, and decreased muscle mass happen to men of all ages; you don’t have to be over 60 to be struggling with these issues. While genetics do play a big role in any issue, there’s also the unspoken stress that comes with living in the 21st Century. You’d be lying if you were to say you’ve escaped the stressful world we live in—and if you have, well, you wouldn’t be reading this article!

We exhaust our bodies in our day-to-day life, which is why it can feel like we’re overwhelmed and stressed. However, there are ways to have a speedy recovery, higher libido, and prevent various signs of aging.This is where you can look into different types of light therapy. 

Light therapy comes in many colors and forms: panels, lamps, masks, you name it. Light therapy devices consist of exposure to filtered light with an intensity of up to 10,000 lux emitted through specific colors. To give you a better idea of light therapy intensity, in comparison, the average light intensity in a room is 500 lux.

Since light enters into the cells, changing their ATP and rejuvenating them, you have accelerated cellular recovery with light therapy. Health benefits of LED light therapy include cellular turnover, which will result in a healthier and better functioning organism long-term. With new, healthier cells, your body is rejuvenated—a natural process that’s quickened via light therapy. 

“Is light therapy good for skin?” Yes! It helps heal, and just like within your body, you can see effects on the skin. It brings the new and healthier layer of skin to the surface via cellular turnover. So not only will you reap long-lasting benefits, you'll achieve them quickly. In the same way it benefits with your inner health, and outer, it can benefit with these main issues men face.

For libido, light therapy increases testosterone in men, evoking the luteinizing hormone, which creates testosterone. 

Data also shows how light therapy can help with hair loss. The light stimulates hair growth and repair, stimulating the release of nitric oxide. It takes consistent treatments; however, with every light therapy treatment, you’ll see the benefits.  

If you’re an active man, you want to make the most out of your workouts. Not only do you want to receive the benefits of being active, but you want to push yourself and get the most out of your workouts. Light therapy can help significantly with muscle recovery. The ATP release, or the fuel of our cells, is what keeps our cells functioning. Through cellular activation, it releases your muscles, helping them relax, increasing the strength and power for the same exercise. This means it makes your workout more effective while aiming to have your muscles recover. 

The beauty is there are at-home light therapy devices that can help you with all your male needs, and, we also offer in-clinic devices as well as private labeling options. Kayian's light therapy devices are MDA-certified and FDA-approved, so whether you’re looking to increase  libido, improve muscle recovery, or stimulate hair growth, our at-home devices give you the privacy and freedom to do so confidently and safely. 

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Light Therapy: Man's Best Friend

Light Therapy: Man's Best Friend

Men: if you’re experiencing any type of noticeable physical change, your body could be telling you something is wrong. It’s nothing to be ashamed of; not everyone is at their best 100% of the time. Sometimes we need to take a step back and realize we have to take some time out of our busy schedules to regenerate our body and energy. 

Men deal with many types of issues; however, when it comes to health, many tend to ignore it until it’s absolutely necessary. While we push our health to the side, we forget small changes are our body’s way of telling us something’s wrong. 

Hair loss, the decline in libido, and decreased muscle mass happen to men of all ages; you don’t have to be over 60 to be struggling with these issues. While genetics do play a big role in any issue, there’s also the unspoken stress that comes with living in the 21st Century. You’d be lying if you were to say you’ve escaped the stressful world we live in—and if you have, well, you wouldn’t be reading this article!

We exhaust our bodies in our day-to-day life, which is why it can feel like we’re overwhelmed and stressed. However, there are ways to have a speedy recovery, higher libido, and prevent various signs of aging.This is where you can look into different types of light therapy. 

Light therapy comes in many colors and forms: panels, lamps, masks, you name it. Light therapy devices consist of exposure to filtered light with an intensity of up to 10,000 lux emitted through specific colors. To give you a better idea of light therapy intensity, in comparison, the average light intensity in a room is 500 lux.

Since light enters into the cells, changing their ATP and rejuvenating them, you have accelerated cellular recovery with light therapy. Health benefits of LED light therapy include cellular turnover, which will result in a healthier and better functioning organism long-term. With new, healthier cells, your body is rejuvenated—a natural process that’s quickened via light therapy. 

“Is light therapy good for skin?” Yes! It helps heal, and just like within your body, you can see effects on the skin. It brings the new and healthier layer of skin to the surface via cellular turnover. So not only will you reap long-lasting benefits, you'll achieve them quickly. In the same way it benefits with your inner health, and outer, it can benefit with these main issues men face.

For libido, light therapy increases testosterone in men, evoking the luteinizing hormone, which creates testosterone. 

Data also shows how light therapy can help with hair loss. The light stimulates hair growth and repair, stimulating the release of nitric oxide. It takes consistent treatments; however, with every light therapy treatment, you’ll see the benefits.  

If you’re an active man, you want to make the most out of your workouts. Not only do you want to receive the benefits of being active, but you want to push yourself and get the most out of your workouts. Light therapy can help significantly with muscle recovery. The ATP release, or the fuel of our cells, is what keeps our cells functioning. Through cellular activation, it releases your muscles, helping them relax, increasing the strength and power for the same exercise. This means it makes your workout more effective while aiming to have your muscles recover. 

The beauty is there are at-home light therapy devices that can help you with all your male needs, and, we also offer in-clinic devices as well as private labeling options. Kayian's light therapy devices are MDA-certified and FDA-approved, so whether you’re looking to increase  libido, improve muscle recovery, or stimulate hair growth, our at-home devices give you the privacy and freedom to do so confidently and safely. 

Beard Growth & Light Therapy

Beard Growth & Light Therapy

Beard Growth & Light Therapy

“The benefit of having a beard is protection, as well as aesthetics,” says Dave Harvey, M.D. “It's good protection against wind, chafing, and traumatic injury. It’s also a trend, so we see a lot of men with some form of facial hair.”

The Health Benefits of Beards

Beards can:

  • Protect skin from sun damage. Beards can help protect the skin from harmful UV rays, though the degree of protection may depend on hair density and thickness. “You’re going to have some protection because hair is a reflective medium,” says Dr. Harvey. “Even though some UV rays get through, there is some scattering of the light, and that’s how it helps protect against sun damage.”
  • Keep you warm. Beards can add a layer of protection to your chin and neck, thus keeping you warm in colder weather. The longer and fuller the beard, the better it will insulate your face.
  • Make you feel more attractive. A study conducted by the Official Journal of the Human Behavior and Evolution Society found that men with a moderately full beard are most attractive. Men with full beards may be perceived as better fathers who could protect and invest in their children. “Men with beards have a powerful look,” says Dr. Harvey. “And that’s an attractive thing.”

Common Problems for Beard Growers

Growing a beard is not always easy. And if your beard is not properly cared for, it can become a harbinger for bacteria.

“If you don’t clean your beard well, and you let it just do its own thing, sometimes you can accumulate yeast and get dandruff within the beard,” says Dr. Harvey. “With that, you’ll get a reactive scaling on the face and flaking like you would with dandruff. So those patients need to be put on antifungal shampoo.”

Beard growers also face the challenge of ingrown follicles that result in bumps known as acne keloidalis.

“Some men will get a raised scarring type of bump called an acne keloidalis of the neck,” he says. “So we offer them topical antibiotics or Retin A for those particular reasons.”

Low-Level Laser Therapy for Beards

Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is an FDA-approved treatment using laser light energy to circulate blood flow to hair follicles. Laser therapy for hair growth can be used to stop hair loss in men and women. The non-invasive lasers stimulate hair follicles to induce regrowth, resulting in a thicker beard in several weeks of treatments.

Laser hair therapy is also called red light therapy. The process irradiates photons in skin tissue, resulting in photons being absorbed into weaker hair follicles and promoting hair growth.

How Successful Is Laser Hair Restoration?

Laser treatment for hair loss works because photons amp up circulation and stimulation, which brings back hair follicles that may have died off.

Clinical Study

Laser hair restoration therapy is continuing to develop. Still, the National Institutes of Health has conducted multiple studies on laser hair growth therapy to see if it works for those with alopecia and male pattern baldness.

The NIH study used a controlled clinical trial that found laser hair therapy works for men and women, and it’s safe.

Another study from 2013 included male participants aged 18 to 48. The result of laser hair therapy treatment included a 39 percent increase in hair growth for participants over four months.

However, laser therapy is just one piece of the puzzle. Many factors contribute to repeated hair loss, including:

  • Age.
  • Genetics.
  • Medical conditions like diabetes and lupus.
  • Hormones.
  • Poor diet.
  • Side effects of medications, such as chemotherapy.
  • Stress.

How Long Does Laser Hair Therapy Take To Work?

From your first treatment, it can take several weeks to see a noticeable difference. This is because red light therapy for hair loss must be administered multiple times over 4 to 6 weeks to begin working.

If you don’t see any growth after 90 days, it’s probably unlikely you’ll regrow hair with this method. You should consult your doctor about the growth cycle and see how long it will take.

The Perfect Pair: Light Therapy & PRP

The Perfect Pair: Light Therapy & PRP

Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) Injections

In recent years, doctors have learned that the body has the ability to heal itself. Platelet-rich plasma therapy is a form of regenerative medicine that can harness those abilities and amplify the natural growth factors your body uses to heal tissue.

What is Plasma, and what are Platelets?

Plasma is the liquid portion of whole blood. It is composed largely of water and proteins, and it provides a medium for red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets to circulate through the body. Platelets, also called thrombocytes, are blood cells that cause blood clots and other necessary growth healing functions. Platelet activation plays a key role in the body’s natural healing process.

What is Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP), and what are PRP injections?

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) therapy uses injections of a concentration of a patient’s own platelets to accelerate the healing of injured tendons, ligaments, muscles, and joints. In this way, PRP injections use each patient’s own healing system to improve musculoskeletal problems.

PRP injections are prepared by taking anywhere from one to a few tubes of your own blood and running it through a centrifuge to concentrate the platelets. These activated platelets are then injected directly into your injured or diseased body tissue. This releases growth factors that stimulate and increase the number of reparative cells your body produces.

Ultrasound imaging is sometimes used to guide the injection. The photographs below illustrate a PRP injection into a patient’s torn tendon. The ultrasound guidance is shown at the left, and the injection is shown at the right.

PRP harnesses the body’s own rejuvenating powers to stimulate hair growth naturally. The treatment involves drawing a small amount of blood from the patient’s arm. This blood is then spun in a centrifuge until the plasma is separated and growth factors and stem cells are extracted. This plasma, complete with growth factors and stem cells, is then injected into the patient’s scalp, stimulating hair growth.

Light Therapy

Red Light/Blue Light therapy uses light energy to stimulate hair growth. Red light/Blue Light therapy works using light delivered at specific therapeutic wavelengths within infrared and red-light spectrums. The energy from these lights stimulates the hair follicles so that they are constantly in the growth, or anagen, stage. This results in thicker, longer, and healthier hair.

Red light (630 nm) therapy stimulates ATP (cellular energy) production to stimulate hair follicle cells. It also increases blood flow to the hair root, which delivers more nutrients to the hair follicle cells. The increased blood flow is also thought to help flush away the damaging waste products that may affect hair growth.

Near-Infrared light (880 nm) therapy, which is an invisible light energy, promotes collagen and elastin production. It penetrates deeper into the scalp to help reduce inflammation, which causes thinning of hair.

Blue light (420 nm) therapy is especially effective for acne, penetrating molecules within the skin that cause P. acnes bacteria to form. These molecules react

Light & Water: The Fourth Phase

Light & Water: The Fourth Phase

Water has three phases — gas, liquid, and solid; but inside Dr.Pollack’s lab, findings imply the presence of a surprisingly extensive fourth phase that occurs at interfaces. The formal name for this fourth phase is exclusion-zone water, aka EZ water. This finding may have profound implications for chemistry, physics, and biology.

The impact of surfaces on the contiguous aqueous phase is generally thought to extend no more than a few water-molecule layers. However, Dr.Pollack found that colloidal and molecular solutes are profoundly excluded from hydrophilic surfaces' vicinity to distances up to several hundred micrometers. Such large exclusion zones have been observed next to many different hydrophilic surfaces, and many diverse solutes are excluded. Hence, the exclusion phenomenon appears to be quite general.​​

Multiple methods have been applied to test whether the exclusion zone's physical properties differ from those of bulk water. NMR, infrared, and birefringence imaging, as well as measurements of electrical potential, viscosity, and UV-VIS and infrared-absorption spectra, collectively reveal that the solute-free zone is a physically distinct, ordered phase of water. It is much like a liquid crystal. It can co-exist essentially indefinitely with the contiguous solute-containing phase. Indeed, this unexpectedly extensive zone may be a candidate for the long-postulated “fourth phase” of water considered by earlier scientists.​

The energy responsible for building this charged, low entropy zone comes from light. We found that incident radiant energy, including UV, visible, and near-infrared wavelengths, induce exclusion-zone growth in a spectrally sensitive manner. IR is particularly effective. Five-minute radiation exposure at 3.1 µm (corresponding to OH stretch) causes an exclusion-zone-width increase of up to three times. Apparently, incident photons cause some change in bulk water that predisposes constituent molecules to reorganize and build the charged, ordered exclusion zone. How this occurs is under study.​

Photons from ordinary sunlight, then, may have an unexpectedly powerful effect that goes beyond mere heating. It may be that solar energy builds to order and separates charge between the near-surface exclusion zone and the bulk water beyond — the separation effectively creating a battery. This light-induced charge separation resembles the first step of photosynthesis. Indeed, this light-induced action would seem relevant not only for photosynthetic processes but also for all realms of nature involving water and interfaces.​

In conclusion, you can think of water as a battery. It’s excellent to absorb and store energy, and it’s good to transfer that energy from water molecule to water molecule (picture the ripples that happen when you drop a rock in a pond). The water molecules end up moving closer together to stabilize themselves; they become denser and more viscous and store energy in the form of a negative charge. This is EZ water. It’s like a charged battery — it’s carrying that valuable vibrational energy and is ready to deliver it. Using light therapy infrared devices from Kaiyan Medical, you can make your EZ water. The other alternative is to sunbathe naked under the sun, but that can lead you to sunburns, so we suggest our devices.

How Light Therapy Enhances Physical Therapy Treatment

How Light Therapy Enhances Physical Therapy Treatment

Though laser technology started with Albert Einstein, the technology didn’t evolve until the 1960’s when a laser prototype at Hughes Research Laboratories in Malibu, California, was first built. However, its purpose wasn’t for the medical industry; instead, for the military.

It eventually trickled down into Hollywood when Sci-Fi directors realized its potential for visual effects. But, of course, it didn’t take long for other fields to jump on the laser light bandwagon, including the medicine and rehabilitation industries. From there, the medical industry began to understand laser light’s impact on the human body when it came to healing and recovery.

Low-level (light) laser therapy (LLLT) is used to treat various conditions, including pain relief and inflammation. Over the past ten years, research and technological advancements have fine-tuned low-level light therapy, making the treatment highly effective in providing pain relief and healing treatment.

What is Low-Level Laser Light Therapy?

Before we talk about its capabilities, it’s essential to understand how it functions. Low-level laser light therapy is a non-invasive technique that gives the body a low dose of light to stimulate cellular healing. Laser light therapy targets the specific area in need to increase mobility by reducing pain and inflammation.

Low-level laser light therapy works through a process called photobiomodulation. During this process, the light is absorbed by the body’s tissue, where the cells respond with a physiological reaction, promoting cellular regeneration. The light stimulates cellular metabolism to promote cell growth and the healing of damaged cells.

How Laser Light Affects the Body

There are a couple of ways laser light therapy affects the body. Here’s what laser light therapy does for the body:

  1. Light energy is absorbed by melanin, hemoglobin, and water. The energy dissolves into heat, creating a soothing and warm sensation. The warming sensation helps patients feel relaxed.
  2. There’s an increase in ATP production in the mitochondria through light energy, the cell’s powerhouse. With increased ATP production, more energy is available for the healing process.
  3. Light energy aids with the release of nitric oxide, which enhances the circulation of damaged tissue. Increased circulation allows for improved oxygen exchange, nutrient exchange, and waste removal.
  4. Light energy releases crucial chemicals that help reduce inflammation.

So can laser light therapy be used alongside physical therapy? The answer is yes. In fact, the two treatments complement each other perfectly.

The Perfect Pair: Laser Light Therapy and Physical Therapy

With patients experiencing chronic or acute pain, the feeling of pain isn’t the main issue. However, patients can reduce pain and inflammation symptoms through laser light therapy while undergoing physical therapy treatments. Laser light therapy is ideal for pre and post-surgical procedures and during rehabilitation.

Patients undergoing laser light therapy will feel warm and soothing healing sensations as well as an immediate reduction in pain after treatment. By reducing pain, patients will improve their physical therapy performance and reduce their healing time. Ideally, four to six laser light therapy sessions are recommended to patients to receive the best results.

Whether you’re looking to improve your chiropractic, dermatology, medical or physical therapy practice, laser light therapy can provide your patients with the extra care they need to reduce chronic or acute pain and inflammation symptoms.

With many laser light products on the market, you want to make sure you’re investing in a medical-grade laser light device for your practice. Kaiyan Medical manufactures MDA-certified and FDA-approved laser light therapy devices, ideal for various medical and rehabilitation industries.

 Red Light Therapy and Fertility

Red Light Therapy and Fertility

There is hardly a day in my various professional roles as a scientist, science watcher, or clinician without encountering new information or a new scenario that highlights the complexity of biology and biological systems. Such occurrences warrant careful evaluation and oftentimes lead to new management strategies or form the basis for further scientific investigation. This is inevitable as the knowledge base expands and our understanding of the variables potentially impacting our strategies and outcomes increases. We continually learn, re-learn and refine what we do and how we do it. The survival and performance of human spermatozoa in vitro is one evolving story that has far-reaching implications in numerous fields in addition to human reproduction.

Infertility is a problem that affects 15% of couples. Male reproductive issues account for one-third of infertility cases, with another third caused by combined male and female reproductive issues or unknown etiologies. Several strategies, including in vitro fertilization (IVF) techniques, are employed clinically to assist infertile couples in their quest for a successful pregnancy. Viable, strong, and normally motile sperm are critical to the success of IVF. It is well-known that spermatozoa in standard culture weaken and lose viability and motility at 12 hours and that by 42 hours, only about 52% remain viable. Fewer strong and motile sperm reduce the probability of a successful IVF cycle. Protocols that could improve viability and performance of sperm in vitro would be of great interest to clinicians and patients alike.

At low concentrations, reactive oxygen species (ROS) act as second messengers that regulate increases in cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), the activation of protein kinase A (PKA), the phosphorylation of PKA substrates of the arginine-X-X-(serine/threonine) motif, the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) proteins and the threonine-glutamate tyrosine motif, as well as fibrous sheath protein tyrosine phosphorylation. These functions are involved in sperm capacitation, acrosome reaction, and oocyte fertilization.

Sperm plasma membranes contain large quantities of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), whereas their cytoplasm contains low concentrations of enzymes that scavenge ROS. High concentrations of ROS overwhelm the endogenous antioxidant defenses of gametes, causing multiple derangements. High concentrations of ROS cause peroxidative damage to plasma membrane PUFA, DNA damage, the depletion of mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP), apoptosis, and the loss of sperm motility.

ROS are generally short-lived in vivo due to several antioxidant pathways and compounds at play. However, they are known to accumulate in both oocytes, and spermatozoa cultures, both of which can generate ROS in small quantities as required for the fertilization process.

Sommer et al. posited that polystyrene softens in the presence of aqueous solutions. This creates conditions that would cause a nanoscopic layer of ROS to become established in plastic Petri dishes in common laboratory use. This hypothesis was confirmed by evaluating the cell performance of ROS-sensitive cell lines cultured in both polystyrene and ultrasmooth nanodiamond coated Petri dishes. The cell lines tested included mouse P19 embryonal carcinoma cells, murine-derived L929 cells, and HeLa cells derived from human cervical cancer. The nanomechanical softening was demonstrated in subsequent work by this group and others.

The use of nanodiamond surface coating of culture dishes was based on the knowledge that this material is both chemically and biologically inert, with a capacity to bind a nanoscopic layer of water to its surface. Sommer demonstrated that the material and this nanolayer were, for practical purposes, ROS-free. They subsequently reported that culturing human sperm cells in diamond-coated Petri dishes rather than the polystyrene dishes typically used for IVF resulted in approximately 20% greater cell survival at 42 hours in the nanodiamond coated cultures. This confirmed that the culture dishes themselves play a role in sperm survival in vitro. That accumulation of ROS on the polystyrene surface is a causative factor in decreasing viability over time.

Sommer et al. went further exposed the cultured spermatozoa to red light at 670 nm. Light at this wavelength is known to be absorbed by cytochrome C oxidase and other molecules, stimulating ATP synthesis and affecting ROS production, among numerous other activities at the cellular, tissue, and whole organism level. However, the caveat is that the light dose and dose rate are important and that all cells and tissues are not equally responsive to photoirradiation.

They found that the number of sperm cells demonstrating grade A motility was enhanced by nearly 300% after 1-hour contact with the nanodiamond coated quartz Petri dishes compared to the counts obtained for spermatozoa in the polystyrene Petri dishes. They also observed that sperm motility was significantly different after contact with polystyrene and nanodiamond when longer periods of photoirradiation were applied. A 3× higher light dose was detrimental to the motility of sperm in polystyrene plate cultures, resulting in a reduction of counts to those of the control group at 45 and 60 minutes post-exposure. The same light dose delivered to spermatozoa cultured in nanodiamond dishes produced a dramatic increase in progressive motility.

This series of experiments demonstrates that diamond Petri dishes and NIR light delivered at specific parameters energize sperm cells in a complementary fashion, whereas polystyrene Petri dishes exhaust them. The red light counteracts internal oxidative stress due to ROS production in mitochondria by suppressing ROS accumulation and enhancing ATP synthesis. Simultaneously, the diamond substrate prevents the build-up of a layer of interfacial ROS between the sperm cell and surface of the culture plate.

Photobiomodulation (PBM) describes the ability to stimulate or inhibit cellular functions by using light at specific wavelengths, intensities, and dosing regimens. The classically described PBM treatment window is between 600 and 1,200 nm. Light in this portion of the spectrum readily penetrates skin and tissues via the so-called optical window. Light is absorbed by various structures and molecules, primarily molecules that are instrumental in energy production and oxygen delivery.

PBM effects depend upon timing, site of treatment, and treatment parameters (dose). PBM has shown efficacy clinically in accelerating wound healing, reducing pain and inflammation, and benefiting other applications, including the treatment of neurologic disorders and injuries.

The mechanistic basis for the outcomes observed after using photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT) results from the upregulation of intracellular metabolism by increasing ATP production, augmenting other metabolic pathways, and reducing ROS and other free radicals production.

The interaction of photons with cells and cellular structures is a necessary condition for PBM. We have learned that all cells and tissues don’t respond to PBM and that one size does not fit all when determining the dose or treatment course. Different photobiomodulation effects have been described depending upon the specific cell lines and species being investigated. Our laboratory demonstrated that cell proliferation and metabolism in vitro could be influenced by varying the dose frequency or treatment interval of the PBMT (17). We have also demonstrated this same phenomenon regarding wound healing in a murine pressure ulcer model. These investigations underscore the concept that a unique dose frequency combination exists for tissues and cell lines. This specific treatment paradigm must be determined to optimize outcomes and maximally stimulate cellular metabolism and proliferation. Our work also demonstrated that using other treatment strategies will paradoxically cause big inhibition, despite delivering the same total energy.

It is becoming increasingly apparent that biological systems are quite complex. They contain numerous pathways poised to work in concert with, or in opposition to, depending upon the organism's current needs. We are beginning to understand that these systems utilize several common denominator substances and reactions and that these can be manipulated using several forces, including light.

As scientists and clinicians, we apply what we have gleaned from the laboratory to solve clinical problems and to form the basis for further investigations. We often base these decisions on results obtained using various cell, tissue, and whole animal models, presuming that these models are translatable to our specific applications. Careful in vitro studies can be powerful tools that guide the design of whole animal and human trials. They facilitate the efficient and reproducible screening of a matrix of treatment parameters. We presume that the animal models we develop accurately reflect the actual biology and physiology found in nature.

Abolins et al. recently demonstrated that laboratory and wild mice's serological, cellular, and functional immune responses differ. Wild-type mice have a population of highly activated myeloid cells that are not found in their laboratory counterparts. The point here is that laboratory models and laboratory conditions, in all likelihood, do not entirely replicate nature.

Sommers’ work demonstrates that PBM with a red light at 670 nm improves spermatic function and viability in vitro. This effect augments the beneficial effects of using nanodiamond coated culture dishes. It also demonstrates that various cell lines respond differently to similar manipulations. This body of work also highlights the fact that the ubiquitous polystyrene culture dish can have a deleterious effect on outcomes. We would do well to recognize that the seemingly innocuous may not be and that we should remain cautious as we interpret experimental results and attempt to apply them. Every detail matters, even the seemingly mundane.

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Why Chiropractors Love Light Therapy

Why Chiropractors Love Light Therapy

Chiropractors Lead the Way

LED light therapy is not new to the medical industry and certainly not new to doctors of chiropractic.

Studied for decades, the use of low-level light therapy (LLLT) — both LED and laser — has been making its way into the medical mainstream in the U.S. since the 1990s. And chiropractors have taken the lead in the clinical use of LED light therapy and are advancing the use of this technology for new applications.

This is no surprise to industry professionals and medical providers because this technology is a perfect pairing to what chiropractors advocate and bring to the medical community: healthy, drug-free healing and pain management options that are highly efficacious. Compared to the high cost and side-effect spectrum of many pharmaceutical drugs, LED light therapy can be a cost-effective alternative to drugs and surgery.

LED light therapy has the ability to increase blood flow and lymphatic circulation, decrease pain, and stimulate many cellular processes that accelerate healing. Plus, it has a high safety level, no known negative side effects is easy to administer, and is non-invasive.

Because LED light therapy can provide pain relief, wound healing and address neuropathy discomfort and various musculoskeletal issues, it is a mainstay in many clinics. Some patients also purchase light therapy systems from their chiropractors for in-home use between office visits for long-term therapy needs such as chronic pain and neuropathy.

It is also an attractive option for new chiropractors just getting started because it can bring substantial benefits to their patients while offering a fast ROI.

How it Works

LEDs deliver wavelengths of incoherent (diffused) light to the body. LEDs are similar to laser diodes, but their light spreads out, unlike the highly focused beam of coherent light that emits from a laser. This more diffused light makes administration exceptionally safe.

This therapy is also known as photobiomodulation — meaning that light can produce a cellular change in the body. Photons of light stimulate the release of nitric oxide, which

is the body’s natural vasodilator, greatly increasing circulation in the local treatment area. Blood flow is increased to nerves and other tissues, improving tissue oxygenation that stimulates healing. This boost persists for several hours after a therapy session.

Research indicates that the benefits of LED light therapy include

  • Increased circulation
  • Decreased inflammation
  • Increased ATP production
  • Collagen production
  • Accelerated exercise recovery time
  • Increased relaxation
  • Decreased stress

LEDs have low power requirements and high efficiency with minimal heat production. Power levels are measured in mW/cm2 (milliwatts per centimeter squared). And LED lifetimes are rated up to 100,000 hours and can last for decades.

The most common device wavelengths are the following:

  • Near-infrared: Many LED therapy devices use the 800 nanometers (nm) range; however, infrared include a much wider spectrum with deep penetration up to 100 mm.
  • Red: 630 to 700 nm, with penetration up to 10 mm.
  • Blue: 405 to 470 nm, with penetration up to 3 mm (beneficial for skin and wound healing).
  • Pulsed frequency(s) or continuous wave devices provide timed sequences of light turning on and off during application, which is thought to accelerate change in the tissues.
  • Continuous-wave devices are always on; no frequency is added to the light.
Applications for Use

Light therapy is commonly used to treat acute and chronic joint pain in the neck, back, leg, shoulder, wrist, knee, and ankle. It can be helpful for arthritis pain, bruises, carpal tunnel syndrome, and musculoskeletal conditions. It is also used to treat skin conditions such as pressure ulcers, wound healing, and scar tissue reduction.

Even NASA has good things to say about light therapy. NASA issued a news release in December 2000, which stated that doctors at Navy Special Warfare Command centers in Norfolk, Virginia, and San Diego reported a 40 percent improvement in patients who had musculoskeletal training injuries treated with light-emitting diodes.1

There are distinct advantages to using LED therapy devices in your clinical practice. For example, Patients can be left unattended during therapy, maximizing staff resources. Large surface areas can be covered by the LED pad or panel, delivering therapeutic photons broadly and safely to the body's targeted area. And systems are generally portable and user friendly.

Moreover, LED light therapy can help you enter niche markets, such as peripheral neuropathy and brain injuries. These are areas where LED light therapy is appearing to be more effective than pharmaceutical approaches.

Brain injuries

An increasing number of scientific studies show expanded indications for LED light therapy to treat neurologic conditions, especially brain injuries and degeneration. The advanced research being done by Michael Hamblin, Ph.D., and his group and by Margaret A. Naeser, Ph.D., at Boston University demonstrates that LED light therapy can positively affect the brain. Naeser’s 2017 study with veterans showed significant improvement after 12 weeks of transcranial photobiomodulation.

Increased function, better sleep, fewer angry outbursts, and less anxiety and wandering were reported with no negative side effects.2

Preliminary brain studies conducted by other groups using transcranial LED light therapy show impressively improved brain blood flow verified before and after single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) brain scans. These brain studies have implications for patients presenting with such conditions as traumatic brain injury (TBI), PTSD, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, concussions, strokes, and depression.

Nearly all neurological disorders have one thing in common: diminished blood flow. And increased circulation and blood flow are precisely what LED light therapy promotes.

Peripheral Neuropathy

More than 3 million new cases of peripheral neuropathy are diagnosed each year in the U.S. alone. LED light therapy has shown significant results in relieving this condition's discomfort and improving sensation, as evidenced by several studies.

Adding LED light therapy systems can help you offer neuropathy therapy as a substantial part of your practice.

FDA Approved

LED light therapy devices have received FDA clearances that temporarily increase local circulation; and the temporary relief of pain, stiffness, and muscle spasms. Many practitioners are hopeful that the FDA will keep expanding clearances for this cutting-edge healing technology.

References
NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center. “NASA Space Technology Shines Light On Healing.” ScienceDaily. http://www.sciencedaily.com/ releases/2000/12/001219195848.htm. Published Dec. 2000. Accessed Jan. 2018.

Salmarche AE, Naeser MA, Ho KF, Hamblin MR, Lim L. Significant Improvement in Cognition in Mild to Moderately Severe Dementia Cases Treated with Transcranial Plus Intranasal Photobiomodulation:

Case Series Report. Photomed Laser Surg. 2017;5(8):432–441.

Fallah A, Mirzaei A, Gutknecht N, Demneh AS. Clinical effectiveness of low-level

laser treatment on peripheral somatosen- sory neuropathy. Lasers Med Sci. 2017 Apr;32(3):721–728.

Mandelbaum-Livnat MM, Almog M, Nissan M, Loeb E, Shapira Y, Rochkind

Photobiomodulation Triple Treatment in Peripheral Nerve Injury: Nerve and Muscle Response. Photomed Laser Surg. 2016;34(12):638–645.



Fetuses May be Able to See More Light than you Think

Fetuses May be Able to See More Light than you Think

By the second trimester, long before a baby's eyes can see images, they can detect light.

But the light-sensitive cells in the developing retina -- the thin sheet of brain-like tissue at the back of the eye -- were thought to be simple on-off switches, presumably there to set up the 24-hour, day-night rhythms parents hope their baby will follow. University of California, Berkeley, scientists have now found evidence that these simple cells actually talk to one another as part of an interconnected network that gives the retina more light sensitivity than once thought, and that may enhance the influence of light on behavior and brain development in unsuspected ways.

In the developing eye, perhaps 3% of ganglion cells -- the retina cells that send messages through the optic nerve into the brain -- are sensitive to light. To date, researchers have found about six different subtypes that communicate with various places in the brain. Some talk to the suprachiasmatic nucleus to tune our internal clock to the day-night cycle. Others send signals to the area that makes our pupils constrict in bright light.

But others connect to surprising areas: the perihabenula, which regulates mood, and the amygdala, which deals with emotions.

Recent evidence suggests that in mice and monkeys, these ganglion cells also talk with one another through electrical connections called gap junctions, implying much more complexity in immature rodent and primate eyes than imagined.

"Given the variety of these ganglion cells and that they project to many different parts of the brain, it makes me wonder whether they play a role in how the retina connects up to the brain," said Marla Feller, a UC Berkeley professor of molecular and cell biology and senior author of a paper that appeared this month in the journal Current Biology. "Maybe not for visual circuits, but non-vision behaviors. Not only the pupillary light reflex and circadian rhythms, but possibly explaining problems like light-induced migraines, or why light therapy works for depression."

Parallel systems in developing retina

The cells, called intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs), were discovered only 10 years ago, surprising those like Feller, who studied the developing retina for nearly 20 years. She played a major role, along with her mentor, Carla Shatz of Stanford University, in showing that spontaneous electrical activity in the eye during development -- so-called retinal waves -- is critical for setting up the correct brain networks to process images later on.

Hence her interest in the ipRGCs seemed to function in parallel with spontaneous retinal waves in the developing retina.

We thought they (mouse pups and the human fetus) were blind at this point in development. We thought that the ganglion cells were there in the developing eye, that they are connected to the brain, but that they were not really connected to much of the rest of the retina, at that point. Now, it turns out they are connected to each other, which was a surprising thing."

Marla Feller, the Paul Licht Distinguished Professor in Biological Sciences and a member of UC Berkeley's Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute.

UC Berkeley graduate student Franklin Caval-Holme combined two-photon calcium imaging, whole-cell electrical recording, pharmacology, and anatomical techniques to show that the six types of ipRGCs in the newborn mouse retina link up electrically, via gap junctions, to form a retinal network that the researchers found not only detect light but respond to the intensity of the light, which can vary nearly a billionfold.

Gap junction circuits were critical for light sensitivity in some ipRGC subtypes. Still, not others, providing a potential avenue to determine which ipRGC subtypes provide the signal for specific non-visual behaviors that light evokes.

"Aversion to light, which pups develop very early, is intensity-dependent," suggesting that these neural circuits could be involved in light-aversion behavior, Caval-Holme said. "We don't know which of these ipRGC subtypes in the neonatal retina actually contributes to the behavior, so it will be fascinating to see what role all these different subtypes have."

The researchers also found evidence that the circuit tunes itself in a way that could adapt to the intensity of light, which probably has an important role in development, Feller said.

"In the past, people demonstrated that these light-sensitive cells are important for things like the development of the blood vessels in the retina and light entrainment of circadian rhythms, but those were kind of a light on/light of the response, where you need some light or no light," she said. "This seems to argue that they are actually trying to code for many different intensities of light, encoding much more information than people had previously thought."
Source:

University of California, Berkeley

Journal reference:

Caval-Holme, F., et al. (2019) Gap Junction Coupling Shapes the Encoding of Light in the Developing Retina. Current Biology. doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2019.10.025.


Light Therapy can Benefit Patients with TBI (Traumatic Brain Injury)

Light Therapy can Benefit Patients with TBI (Traumatic Brain Injury)

According to a pioneering study by researchers from the Wellman Center for Photomedicine at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), light therapy is safe and has measurable effects on the brain.

Senior investigators Rajiv Gupta, MD, Ph.D., director of the Ultra-High Resolution Volume CT Lab at MGH and Benjamin Vakoc, Ph.D., at the Wellman Center led the study, which was supported by a grant from the Department of Defense (DOD) and published in JAMA Network Open September 14th.

This study is one of the first, if not the first, prospective, randomized, interventional clinical trials of near-infrared, low-level light therapy (LLLT) in patients who recently suffered a moderate brain injury. If further trials support these findings, light therapy could become the first widely-accepted treatment for this type of injury.

TBI is the leading cause of traumatic injury worldwide, and an estimated 69 million people experience such an injury every year. However, there are no treatments for this condition yet, largely because the underlying biological mechanisms are not well understood. It is so challenging to do studies with actual patients in the acute stage of trauma.

"The Gulf War put TBI in the headlines because body armor had been greatly improved by then. But there were still brain injuries caused by the shock waves from high powered explosives.”

Rajiv Gupta, MD, PhD, Director, Ultra-High Resolution Volume CT Lab

For various reasons, the number of TBIs has increased around the globe since then, but effective treatments are still sorely needed. For this study, a special helmet had to be designed specifically to deliver the therapy, an undertaking that required a mix of medical, engineering, and physics expertise.

This multidisciplinary team included Gupta, a neuroradiologist, Vakoc, an applied physicist, and others specializing in developing and translating optical instrumentation to the clinic and biologic laboratories. Both Gupta and Vakoc are also associate professors at Harvard Medical School.

“For this study, we designed a practical, near-infrared treatment based on Wellman Center research and working directly with DOD on the vexing problem of TBI, a condition faced by so many,” says Rox Anderson, MD, the center’s director.

Another challenge was optimizing the wavelength of the near-infrared LLLT.

“Nobody knows how much light you need to get the optimal effect,”

explains Lynn Drake, MD, one of the study co-authors and director of business development at the Wellman Center.

“We tried to optimize the wavelength, dosing, timing of delivery, and length of exposure.”

This was done through a series of pre-clinical experiments led by Anderson. These included multiple preclinical studies led by Michael Hamblin, Ph.D. Anderson and Hamblin are both co-authors of this paper.

Near-infrared LLLT has already been considered for multiple uses, but to date, few if any studies of this technology have been tested and none in patients with TBI.

It has been studied in stroke patients, and Wellman's basic laboratory research suggests it is neuroprotective through a mechanism mediated by specialized intracellular organs called mitochondria. It took several years of research at Wellman to understand the basic mechanism before the clinical trial.

The randomized clinical trial included 68 patients with moderate traumatic brain injury who were divided into two groups. One group received LLLT via the special helmet, which delivered the light. Patients in the control group wore the helmet for the same amount of time but did not receive the treatment.

Vakoc’s team at Wellman designed the helmet. During the study, the subjects’ brains were tested for neuron activity using quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) metrics, and the subjects also underwent neurocognitive function assessment.

MRI was performed in the acute (within 72 hours of the injury), early subacute (2–3 weeks), and late subacute (approximately three months) stages of recovery. During each visit and at six months, clinical assessments were performed using the Rivermead Post-Concussion Questionnaire, with each item assessed on a five-point scale.

Twenty-eight patients completed at least one LLLT session, and none reported any adverse reactions. Also, the researchers found that they could measure the effects of transcranial LLLT on the brain.

The MRI studies showed statistically significant differences in myelin's integrity surrounding the neurons of treated patients versus the control group. Both these findings support follow-up trials, especially since there are no other treatments for these patients.

The study also showed that light does impact the cells. While it is well established that cells have light receptors, “going into this trial, we had several unanswered questions such as whether the light would go through the scalp and skull, whether the dose was sufficient, and whether it would be enough to engage the neural substrates responsible for repair after TBI,” says Gupta.

It’s important to note, and he adds that for this initial study, the researchers focused on patients with moderate traumatic brain injury. That helped ensure their study could have statistically significant findings because patients in this category are more likely to demonstrate a measurable effect.

“It would be much more difficult to see such changes in patients with mild injuries, and it is quite likely that in patients with severe brain injuries, the effect of light therapy would be confounded by other comorbidities of severe trauma,”

says Gupta.

He adds that researchers are still very early in the development of this therapy. It is unknown if it could be applied to other types of brain injury, such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), which has received a lot of public attention over the last few years.

CTE is a progressive degenerative disease associated with a history of repetitive brain trauma such as that experienced by certain athletes, most notably football players.

This study opens up many possibilities for the broader use of photomedicine. “Transcranial LED therapy is a promising area of research, with potential to help various brain disorders where therapies are limited,” says Margaret Naeser, Ph.D., a prominent researcher in photomedicine and research professor of Neurology at Boston University School of Medicine. She was not affiliated with this particular study.

Source:

Massachusetts General Hospital

Journal reference:

Longo, M, G. F., et al. (2020) Effect of Transcranial Low-Level Light Therapy vs. Sham Therapy Among Patients With Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury. doi.org/10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2020.17337.

Half a Trillion-Dollar Market  —  Men.

Half a Trillion-Dollar Market  —  Men.

There’s an emerging disruptor in the beauty industry as companies target a different consumer type to expand the half a trillion-dollar market — men.

Across the globe, men’s adoption of beauty use is already starting to take off. But the trend comes in many different shapes and forms. For beauty companies struggling to find new avenues of growth, it’s a huge opportunity to see whether men are looking for traditional grooming products, discreet moisturizers, beauty balms, or popular light therapy.

According to Allied Market Research, the men’s personal care industry is predicted to hit $166 billion by 2022. According to market researcher NPD Group, just last year, men’s skin-care products alone saw a more than 7% jump in sales and with the category currently valued at $122 million.

“In recent years, the notion that men can’t or shouldn’t be using skin-care products or caring more in general about all aspects of their appearance has been receding,”

Said Andrew Stablein, a research analyst at Euromonitor International, in a research note.

The success of digitally native brands catered directly to men such as Harry’s and popular subscription service Dollar Shave Club reveal

“the average men’s grooming routine isn’t about just shaving, but can be aided by using skin-care products,”

Stablein said.

Even high-end designers like Chanel have jumped on the trend, launching its first made-for-men skincare and cosmetics line known as “Boy De Chanel” last September.

“It seems that mass players are trying to expand their market and gain share in a slowing market by growing their user base,”

Said Alison Gaither, beauty and personal care analyst at Mintel.

This includes tutorials from U.K. makeup artist Charlotte Tilbury and Rihanna’s Fenty brand, which have both put out instructions for guys who want to use makeup subtly for a more groomed appearance.

According to Coresight Research, the Asia Pacific market is now one of the fastest-growing regions for men’s grooming and cosmetic product use. Jason Chen, general manager for Chinese online retail site Tmall, told Coresight that “supply cannot meet the demand for male make-up products across China.”

However, recent data suggests the new generation of beauty consumers prefer a non-binary approach altogether. According to NPD’s iGen Beauty Consumer report, nearly 40% of adults aged 18–22 have shown interest in gender-neutral beauty products and holistic products.

“There are so many … [people] growing up with the idea that you’re not tied to the gender you’re born with,”

Said Larissa Jensen, a beauty industry analyst at NPD.

“Beauty is no longer what you’re putting out as ‘ideal beauty.’ Beauty can be anything, anyone, and any gender.”

In 2016, shortly after Coty acquired CoverGirl, the brand made history with its first-ever “CoverBoy” featuring popular YouTube makeup artist James Charles.

Charles recently found himself in a very public spat with Tati Westbrook, another YouTube beauty vlogger. Coverage of the feud, which began after Charles backed a vitamin brand that was a rival to Westbrook’s own, has been widespread and shows the influence these internet personalities have and how the business has evolved over the past two years.

While Charles may be having his struggles now, as he has lost millions of subscribers, the attention he originally received from CoverGirl sparked similar collaborations by major brands including L’Oreal, who featured beauty blogger Manny Gutierrez, known under the moniker Manny MUA, as the face of its Maybelline Colossal mascara campaign in 2017.

“I think a lot of people misconstrue a man wearing makeup as someone that is transgender or someone that wants to be a drag queen, but it’s not that,”

Guitterez, founder and CEO of Lunar beauty told CNBC.

“I think right now people are still intimidated by the aspect of it.”

Gutierrez’s makeup tutorials and product reviews have attracted nearly 5 million subscribers to his YouTube page. According to a note by the NPD Group, one setting powder product saw a 40% surge in sales after Gutierrez promoted it on his YouTube channel.

“It’s all about inclusivity and encouraging people to be a little more inclusive with both men and women,”

Said Gutierrez.

“I think that as time progresses and you see more men in beauty, it’ll get a little bit better and better.”



Which is the Vitamin that is not Normally Found in any Vegetarian Food? — Vitamin D

Which is the Vitamin that is not Normally Found in any Vegetarian Food? — Vitamin D

What would happen if you don’t get enough sun?

Which is the vitamin that is not normally found in any vegetarian food? Vitamin D.

Scientists have defined vitamins as organic (carbon-containing) chemicals that must be obtained from dietary sources because they are not produced by our bodies. Vitamins play a crucial role in our body’s metabolism, but only tiny amounts are needed to fill that role.

The discovery of Vitamin D was the culmination of a long search for a way to cure rickets in the 1920s, a painful childhood bone disease. Within a decade, the fortification of foods with vitamin D was on the way, and rickets became rare in the United States. However, research results suggest that vitamin D may have a role in other aspects of human health.

Vitamin Dit’s absent from all-natural foods except for fish and egg yolks, and even when it’s obtained from foods, it must be transformed by the body before it can do any good. That’s why the energy of the Sun is so important.

The sun’s energy turns a chemical in your skin into vitamin D3, which is carried to your liver and then your kidneys to transform it into active vitamin D.

The main cause of vitamin D deficiency is a lack of direct sunlight.
The main cause of vitamin D deficiency is a lack of direct sunlight

Humans, day by day, spend less time outdoors. Most people work indoors now, and many of our leisure pursuits occur in an indoor setting as well. What’s more, when we are outside, many people avoid the sun as much as possible. The result is the body not absorbing enough UVB rays to create the amount of vitamin D it requires. Often, symptoms of vitamin D deficiency are quite mild. When noticed, they mainly consist of:

  • Bone pain.
  • Chronic fatigue.
  • Frequent bone fractures.
  • Muddled thought processes.
  • Muscle weakness.
  • Soft or deformed bones.

Though you may not notice any symptoms, that doesn’t mean that vitamin D deficiency doesn’t present serious health risks. These include:

  • Children may develop severe asthma.
  • Immune system problems, raising your risk of infection.
  • Insulin resistance, impacting your body’s ability to process sugar and increasing your risk of diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and glucose intolerance.
  • Osteoporosis, a condition that includes brittle bones that are more likely to fracture.
  • Reduced cognitive function.
  • Rickets, a bone disease that causes soft bones and skeletal deformities.
Other conditions that would happen without enough sunlight

Less chance of having a baby

Without sunlight, there will be more melatonin in a woman’s body. This is a hormone that suppresses fertility, thereby reducing her chances of conceiving a baby. Moreover, women who get less sunlight reach their menopause earlier than those who are exposed to the Sun. Men can also suffer from a lack of sunlight; it directly influences testosterone levels.

Less chance of having a baby

Raw nerves

It’s believed that if children don’t get enough sunlight, they’ll be more at risk of developing multiple sclerosis, a disease of the central nervous system when they become adults.

All those aches and pains

Without sunlight, be prepared to get more pains all over your body. Sunlight helps to warm the body’s muscles and reduce the pain caused by inflammatory conditions such as arthritis.

No sunny emotions

Image for post

Without sunlight, we would be forever stuck with the seasonal affective disorder (SAD), commonly known as the winter blues. It’s a form of depression that is specifically caused by a lack of sunlight. Artificial light cannot fully replace natural sunlight.

Recent evidence suggests that vitamin D may help prevent many disorders, such as diabetes, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, bronchitis, premenstrual syndrome, increased blood pressure, strokes and heart attacks, and even cancer. Low serum vitamin D levels are also associated with being overweight, abdominal obesity, metabolic syndrome, stroke, and diabetes. In addition, having lower blood vitamin D levels for a long period is associated with increased heart attacks and all-cause mortality.

In Kaiyan medical, we believe in the benefits of light. We believe in healing without chemicals. With our lights, we want you to have the best version of yourself. More at kaiyanmedical.com

References:

Holick MF (March 2006). “High prevalence of vitamin D inadequacy and implications for health”. Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 81 (3): 353–73. doi:10.4065/81.3.353. PMID 16529140.

Holick MF (December 2004). “Sunlight and vitamin D for bone health and prevention of autoimmune diseases, cancers, and cardiovascular disease”. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 80 (6 Suppl): 1678S–88S. doi:10.1093/ajcn/80.6.1678S. PMID 15585788.

Weick MT (November 1967). “A history of rickets in the United States”. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 20 (11): 1234–41. doi:10.1093/ajcn/20.11.1234. PMID 4862158.

Aghajafari F, Nagulesapillai T, Ronksley PE, Tough SC, O’Beirne M, Rabi DM (March 2013). “Association between maternal serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level and pregnancy and neonatal outcomes: systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies”. BMJ. 346: f1169. doi:10.1136/bmj.f1169. PMID 23533188.

Palacios C, De-Regil LM, Lombardo LK, Peña-Rosas JP (November 2016). “Vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy: Updated meta-analysis on maternal outcomes”. The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. 164: 148–155. doi:10.1016/j.jsbmb.2016.02.008. PMC 5357731. PMID 26877200.

Roth DE, Leung M, Mesfin E, Qamar H, Watterworth J, Papp E (November 2017). “Vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy: state of the evidence from a systematic review of randomised trials”. BMJ. 359: j5237. doi:10.1136/bmj.j5237. PMC 5706533. PMID 29187358.